Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What I am trying to do is take a string, say "((4+2)/2)", and evaluate it, returning 3. I am supposed to do this by separating the string into three separate stacks... one for the open parentheses '(', one for the digits '0' - '9', and one for the operators, '+' '-' '*' '/' and '%'.

The issue I am having is actually separating the string into stacks. My code is as follows:

//The evaluate function takes a string containing an arithmetic expression,
//evaluates it,and returns its result
int evaluate(string exp)
 {
 stack<char> parStack;
 stack<int> numStack;
 stack<char> opStack;

 int j = exp.size();
 int i=0;
 char x;

 //for (i=0; i<j; i++)
 //{
 while (i<j)
 {
     if(exp[i] = '(')
     {
         parStack.push(exp[i]);
         cout << exp[i] << endl;  // just to see what is being pushed
     }
     if((exp[i]='0') || (exp[i]='1') || (exp[i]='2') || (exp[i]='3') || (exp[i]='4') || (exp[i]='5') || (exp[i]='6') || (exp[i]='7') || (exp[i]='8') || (exp[i]='9'))  // I feel this is terribly inefficient
     {
         numStack.push(exp[i]);
     }
     if((exp[i] = '+') || (exp[i] = '-') || (exp[i] = '*') || (exp[i] = '/') || (exp[i] = '%'))
     {
         opStack.push(exp[i]);
     }
     i++;
 }
 //}  // end for

 return -1;

 }  // end evaluate

As you can see, I've tried tackling this with both for loops and while loops, both giving the same result. What happens is, for some reason, if I enter "(5+3)", it prints out "(((((" as what is being pushed. Why is my if statement repeating itself like this? Ignore for now the return -1 at the end, as that will be completed to actually evaluate the string, which I'm sure I can handle, once I can effectively create the stacks.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

you should use two "=" in your if statement

if(exp[i] = '(')  //wrong (your code)
if(exp[i] == '(') //right
share|improve this answer
    
Wow, I feel pretty dumb. I definitely should have been able to see that. This plagued me for about two straight hours... -_- Thank you! –  Dreiak Oct 31 '12 at 1:42

you have used = operator instead of == operator. When the code executes ascii value of '(' is checked in if condition and also is assigned to your string. Just change it to == your code will work fine....

share|improve this answer
    
I can't believe I didn't see that.. I knew it was something so simple. Thank you for the help! Case closed. –  Dreiak Oct 31 '12 at 1:43

Also for practical purpose, you might want to change the if condition to use string searching like so :

const char OPEN_PARAN = '(';
const string digits = "0123456789";
const string operators = "*-+%";


//...
while(i < j){
  if(exp[i] == OPEN_PARAN){ ... }
  else if(digits.find(exp[i]) != string::npos){ ... }
  else if(operators.find(exp[i]) != string::npos){ ... }
  else{ ... }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.