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I've converted the video to an mp4 with ffmpeg using the h264 codec and AAC, and used the baseline profile.

Videos are 540x360x250kbps

I then ran qt-faststart on the file to move the atoms into the right order.

I've stuck the file up on a wiki we use and created a link to it.

My test phone is a Samsung Galaxy S3.

When I browse to the page that has links to the mp4's on it, and I click on them, I get a popup window with 2 options: Internet and Video.

If I download the videos using the "Internet" option, I can play them on the phone without issue.

I've done other encodings with the main profile as well, and these also play fine. I thought that a powerful phone like the s3 would be able to handle the more advanced compression schemes available in h264, however I've also browsed the Android docs in regards to supported video formats, and it seems to state that only the "baseline" compression profile is supported.

Regardless, what doesn't work is trying to use the "Video" option which I assume tries to stream the video.

For the wiki in question, clicking on the link reveals that the content-type and content-length headers are being set:

Content-Length  6175996
Content-Type    video/mp4;charset=UTF-8

Clicking on the link with a browser invokes a player (Quicktime in most cases) that can play the mp4's.

Is there more to having the file HTTP streamable beyond making a link to it? Why won't my Android 4 play these files?

UPDATE: I decided to make a quick HTML5 page using the video tag, and the videos do play on both my Galaxy S3 and the latest IOS.

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Did not understand what you meant by "Video" link –  av501 Oct 31 '12 at 4:04
    
@av501, I meant "menu choice" above. when I access a webpage that has a link to a video, there are 2 options in a menu popup. "Video" is the one I was talking about. I've clarified the original message. –  gview Oct 31 '12 at 18:20
    
@gview i tried sample code from api demos .and use this link video link it worked in real devices .But when i checked with other links it won't –  edwin Feb 20 '13 at 4:32
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3 Answers

If you want to make an mp4 streamable (so that it can start playing before download is complete) you need to run qt-faststart to get the moov atom in the right place.

See http://forums.creativecow.net/thread/291/486#610 for more info and lots of references.

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Apparently you didn't read my question very carefully, as I clearly stated on line 3: "I then ran qt-faststart on the file to move the atoms into the right order." –  gview Nov 2 '12 at 23:43
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mp4 is not a streaming format. Unless you have a player that can handle pseudo streaming or pd streaming a link will simply cause a download. To get playback of mp4 file without downloading you need to have a player support. The default player is meant to play local files. To play files off the web in pseudo streaming form you need to have atleast a webapp with the appropriate player [say jwplayer]

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I've used the video option to play mp4's directly from other sites. I suppose I'll have to do some investigation into what those sites are doing. I guess I'm suprised that it wouldn't work as a progressive download using HTTP. –  gview Oct 31 '12 at 19:00
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Check the mime type the server is returning for the mp4 file. Perhaps it is only that? –  av501 Oct 31 '12 at 19:18
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I suspect you are referring to Apple's HTTP Live Streaming (HLS), which is supported in Android since Honeycomb. There is ( as you suspect ) more involved than sticking an mp4 file on an HTTP server. You can read up more on the Apple's developer resources.

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I assumed that the video player would support some sort of HTTP streaming. I'm trying to understand why player returns an error saying it can't play a video, when clearly it can, if the video is downloaded. Probably what we're going to do is implement HTTP Pseudostreaming, but my expectation was that the video player would work, even for a normal mp4 file served via HTTP. –  gview Oct 31 '12 at 18:26
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