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I received a PDF file of tabular data that I've converted to plaintext for processing.

pdftotext -nopgbrk -layout file.pdf

This does a pretty decent job but uses spaces to separate/delimit the fields in the columns and seems primarily interested in preserving the visual layout rather than 'structural' layout Ie., there is no consistent or reliable delimiter. So now I convert 2 or more spaces to tabs:

sed -i 's/[[:space:]]\{2,\}/\t/g' file.txt

Using cat -vte I see that this does a pretty nice job placing tabs in the file ....however, there are a few inconsistencies with the second field that I'd like to ask your help with.

Please see the following comparison for clarification:

Normal/Expected results:

79879   5.6     0.5     MG      EN      SQ      TFK World Report 09-24-2004     Time for Kids Editors,  ORD1915643
79880   5.5     0.5     MG      EN      SQ      TFK World Report 10-01-2004     Time for Kids Editors,  ORD1915643
79881   6.0     0.5     MG      EN      SQ      TFK World Report 10-08-2004     Time for Kids Editors,  ORD1915643
79882   5.5     0.5     MG      EN      SQ      TFK World Report 10-22-2004     Time for Kids Editors,  ORD1915643
79883   5.9     0.5     MG      EN      SQ      TFK World Report 10-29-2004     Time for Kids Editors,  ORD1915643

Some oddities and inconsistencies:

72      5.2 3.0 MG      EN      LS      Ramona and Her Father   Cleary, Beverly ORD2111460
491     4.8 4.0 MG      EN      LS      Ramona and Her Mother   Cleary, Beverly ORD1748201
134     5.6 3.0 MG      EN      LS      Ramona Quimby, Age 8    Cleary, Beverly ORD1748201
29      4.7     5.0 MG  EN      LS      From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E.        Konigsburg, E.L.        ORD1525579

Note that the 'smushing' effect may occur in either field 2 or field 3 ...AND, that the number of fields differs with the 'normal' results by either 1 or 2.

...So, to solve this I've tried stuff like the following:

awk -F'\t' 'OFS="\t";$1 ~ /^[[:digit:]]/{print $1,gensub(/[[:space:]]/,"\t","g",$2),$3,$4,$5,$6,$7}' file.txt

This seems to double each, or at least most, line(s) and cuts off fields.

EDIT This seems to be working ...so far, still testing.

awk -F'\t' '{$2 = gensub( /[[:space:]]/, "\t", "g", $2 );
             $3 = gensub( /[[:space:]]/, "\t", "g", $3 )}
             {OFS="\t";print}' file.txt

Is there a simple way to solve this issue using awk?

UPDATE

Some have requested a sample representing the state just prior to my space tab conversion. The following represents a sample near where the previous sample is in the document. Looks about the same ...except one [below] is spaced, the other [above] tabbed. Note the way pdftotext deals with column 2 in the different samples below ...sometimes splitting, sometimes making a single column.

Sample 1:

    72   5.2 3.0 MG       EN   RP     Ramona and Her Father                     Cleary, Beverly              ORD0630871
are orphans
   491   4.8 4.0 MG       EN   RP     Ramona and Her Mother                     Cleary, Beverly              ORD0785414
are also orphans
   186   4.8 4.0 MG       EN   RP     Ramona Forever                            Cleary, Beverly              ORD0630871
forever the orphan

Sample 2:

  79871    5.7   0.5   MG   EN    SQ        TFK World Report 03-18-2005         Time for Kids Editors,       ORD1915643
  79872    5.8   0.5   MG   EN    SQ        TFK World Report 04-01-2005         Time for Kids Editors,       ORD1915643
  79873    6.0   0.5   MG   EN    SQ        TFK World Report 04-08-2005         Time for Kids Editors,       ORD1915643

UPDATE 2

Made the following changes to Ed's submission. Thinking it could be simplified, but it works. It has to allow for the orphaned lines.

$1 ~ /^[[:digit:]]+/{
   for (i=1;i<=6;i++)
      printf "%s\t", $i

   n = split($0,tmp,/  +/)

   for (i=2;i>=0;i--)
      printf "%s\t", tmp[n-i]

   print ""
}
$1 ~ /^[^[:digit:]]+/ {print $0}

Maybe this is prettier:

{
        if ($1 ~ /^[[:digit:]]+/) {
                for (i=1;i<=6;i++)
                printf "%s\t", $i

                n = split($0,tmp,/  +/)

                for (i=2;i>=0;i--)
                printf "%s\t", tmp[n-i]

                print ""
        }
        else print $0;
}
share|improve this question
    
If no fields are empty, you could compress tabs the same way you did with spaces. –  Thor Oct 31 '12 at 8:53
    
If you can post some raw data, we can test our answers. Much better than wasting time on guesses. Also check out unexpand(1) to convert spaces to tabs. It may not be applicable for your use, but it's a handy tool to know about. –  ghoti Oct 31 '12 at 13:47
    
@ghoti ~ first, the second table above is raw data. Large spaces are tabs. Second, knew about unexpand, but as you mention, not applicable here. Thanks –  Bubnoff Oct 31 '12 at 14:32
1  
@EdMorton, you can make code in comments much more readable by using backticks. –  Graham Nov 1 '12 at 11:29
1  
@EdMorton, Nope, no newlines in comments. That is, you can put them in, but the site removes them. I guess it's a strategy for keeping answers in answers. You can also double your "outside" backticks to put backticks inside backticks: pi=`dc -e '2k22 7/p'` –  Graham Nov 1 '12 at 15:19
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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Rather than us starting with the output of a sed command that may be what is corrupting your data, post your data BEFORE you run that sed command on it and let us go from there. I suspect that since you say the PDF conversion tool preserves the "visual layout" that the right solution is probably to simply use gawk's FIELDWIDTHS capability on that so you parse the PDF converters output based on the width of the fields rather than trying to figure out how many spaces it takes to represent a field separator.

EDIT: here's a match()-based solution for comparison, but I actually now think @ghoti is right and the solutions is simpler than this:

$ cat file
    72   5.2 3.0 MG       EN   RP     Ramona and Her Father     Cleary, Beverly    ORD0630871
   491   4.8 4.0 MG       EN   RP     Ramona and Her Mother     Cleary, Beverly    ORD0785414
  79872  5.8  0.5  MG  EN   SQ    TFK World Report 04-01-2005  Time for Kids Editors,  ORD1915643
  79873  6.0  0.5  MG  EN   SQ    TFK World Report 04-08-2005  Time for Kids Editors,  ORD1915643
$
$ cat tst.awk
BEGIN {
   whl = "([[:digit:]]+)"
   dec = "([[:digit:]]+[.][[:digit:]]+)"
   wrd = "([^ ]+)"
   rst = "(.*)"
   s   = "[ ]+"
   fmt = whl s dec s dec s wrd s wrd s wrd s rst
}
{
   match($0,fmt,arr)
   split(arr[7],tmp,/  +/)
   arr[7] = tmp[1]
   arr[8] = tmp[2]
   arr[9] = tmp[3]

   for (i=1;i<=9;i++)
      printf "<%s>", arr[i]
   print ""
}
$
$ awk -f tst.awk file
<72><5.2><3.0><MG><EN><RP><Ramona and Her Father><Cleary, Beverly><ORD0630871>
<491><4.8><4.0><MG><EN><RP><Ramona and Her Mother><Cleary, Beverly><ORD0785414>
<79872><5.8><0.5><MG><EN><SQ><TFK World Report 04-01-2005><Time for Kids Editors,><ORD1915643>
<79873><6.0><0.5><MG><EN><SQ><TFK World Report 04-08-2005><Time for Kids Editors,><ORD1915643>

EDIT: yeah, here's a simpler solution, just print the first 6 fields and then split the rest on a multi-space separator:

$ cat tst2.awk
{
   for (i=1;i<=6;i++)
      printf "<%s>", $i

   n = split($0,tmp,/  +/)

   for (i=2;i>=0;i--)
      printf "<%s>", tmp[n-i]

   print ""
}
$
$ awk -f tst2.awk file
<72><5.2><3.0><MG><EN><RP><Ramona and Her Father><Cleary, Beverly><ORD0630871>
<491><4.8><4.0><MG><EN><RP><Ramona and Her Mother><Cleary, Beverly><ORD0785414>
<79872><5.8><0.5><MG><EN><SQ><TFK World Report 04-01-2005><Time for Kids Editors,><ORD1915643>
<79873><6.0><0.5><MG><EN><SQ><TFK World Report 04-08-2005><Time for Kids Editors,><ORD1915643>
share|improve this answer
    
The widths are not consistent in any way after the pdftotext step. The sed statement just looks for splits of 2 spaces or more. I will post an original snippet so you can see. It wouldn't be the first time I've missed something embarrassingly obvious ...won't be the last, unfortunately. –  Bubnoff Oct 31 '12 at 16:44
    
I have added samples from the original ...just after the pdf to text conversion. –  Bubnoff Oct 31 '12 at 16:55
    
I'm experimenting with your FIELDWIDTH idea. Problem is that it's difficult to assign widths to the first few columns that allow for higher numbers while still separating the fields correctly. If you're interested I'll post my trials above. –  Bubnoff Oct 31 '12 at 17:51
    
I'm now thinking that a GNU awk match() solution populating the optional 3rd arg array might be what you really need. I'm going to poke at that a bit and get back to you. –  Ed Morton Oct 31 '12 at 18:18
    
I think this is it! Am testing ...to be continued. –  Bubnoff Oct 31 '12 at 18:52
show 7 more comments

Your original awk script seems to double each line because OFS="\t" evaluates to true, therefore prints the current line. Put this in a BEGIN{} block to avoid the repeats:

gawk -F'\t' 'BEGIN{OFS=FS} $1 ~ /^[[:digit:]]/ {print $1,gensub(/[[:space:]]/,"\t","g",$2),$3,$4,$5,$6,$7}' file.txt

Note that gensub() is part of gawk, so is not portable. You can achieve the same thing portably with this:

awk -F'\t' 'BEGIN{OFS=FS} $1 ~ /^[[:digit:]]/ {gsub(/[[:space:]]/,"\t",$2); print $1,$2,$3,$4,$5,$6,$7}' file.txt

That said ... with your update, I can see that the original data is well-enough formatted that we can probably just process it as-is. Annoying that you have only a single space between columns 2 and 4, or we could simply use multiple-spaces as a field separator. But it's an predictable input format nevertheless.

It seems that for your first 6 fields, input is separated by "any whitespace", and for the last 3 fields, it is separated by "two or more spaces". With that in mind, we could use the following awk to parse your input data:

#!/usr/bin/awk -f

BEGIN {
  FS="  +";
  fmt="----\n1=%s\n2=%s\n3=%s\n4=%s\n5=%s\n6=%s\n7=%s\n8=%s\n9=%s\n";
}

{
  # Grab the right-hand fields, separated by FS
  a[7]=$(NF-2); a[8]=$(NF-1); a[9]=$NF;

  # Then trim the line and grab initial fields, separated by whitespace
  sub(/^ +/, "");
  split($0, easy, /[[:space:]]+/);
  for(i=1;i<=6;i++) {
    a[i]=easy[i+1];
  }

  printf(fmt, a[1], a[2], a[3], a[4], a[5], a[6], a[7], a[8], a[9]);
}

This assumes that the break between your second last field and last field will ALWAYS have more than 1 space (as is shown in the input data you've supplied in your question). You/we can code around this if this isn't a safe assumption.

Adjust the output as you see fit.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for spotting the easy way to do it, it inspired me to re-think the match() approach I was working on! –  Ed Morton Oct 31 '12 at 19:57
    
Toss up between yours and Ed's. Yours works as well. Upvoted! –  Bubnoff Oct 31 '12 at 20:28
    
FYI the functional difference is that mine would work with or without white space at the start of the line. That's because I changed the FS for the end of the line rather than the start. –  Ed Morton Oct 31 '12 at 21:05
    
Alrighty, I've kept FS the same, but removed the sensitivity to leading whitespace with a sub(). –  ghoti Oct 31 '12 at 23:34
    
@ghoti ITYM /^ */ not /^ _/ –  Ed Morton Nov 1 '12 at 0:13
show 1 more comment

Instead of {print $1,gensub(/[[:space:]]/,"\t","g",$2),$3,$4,$5,$6,$7}, try:

{ $2 = gensub( /[[:space:]]/, "\t", "g", $2 ); print }
share|improve this answer
    
This looks like what I was shooting for but couldn't get the syntax right. Thanks. Will test later this morning. –  Bubnoff Oct 31 '12 at 14:35
    
This isn't going to work. There seems to be a conflict between my replacement, which is a tab, and the fact that both the FS and OFS are tabs. It is still duplicating lines ...not only that, but doesn't have any effect on the column in question. Using: awk -F'\t' 'OFS="\t";{$2 = gensub( /[[:space:]]/, "\t", "g", $2 );print}' –  Bubnoff Oct 31 '12 at 17:15
    
This seems to be working: awk -F'\t' '{$2 = gensub( /[[:space:]]/, "\t", "g", $2 )}{OFS="\t";print}'. Still testing. –  Bubnoff Oct 31 '12 at 17:24
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Try doing this :

column -t file.txt > newfile.txt
share|improve this answer
    
This splits fields like titles and authors. Too aggressive -- also, inconsistent. Thanks though. –  Bubnoff Oct 31 '12 at 1:39
    
When I specify a delimiter it does about the same job as pdftotext but with other 'oddities' added. column -t -s'\t' –  Bubnoff Oct 31 '12 at 1:42
add comment

I gather that only the 2nd and 3rd columns from the end can actually have spaces in them?

I'd try something like this bit of Python:

import re
import sys

for line in sys.stdin:
    start = line.rstrip().split(None, 6)
    end = start.pop().rsplit(None, 1)
    mid = re.split('\s\s+', end.pop(0), maxsplit=1)
    print '\t'.join(start + mid + end)

edit: OK, if you want to stick with coreutils/textutils tools, here's a sed script that does roughly the same thing as the above Python:

#!/bin/sed -f
s/^ *//
s/ \+/\t/
s/ \+/\t/
s/ \+/\t/
s/ \+/\t/
s/ \+/\t/
s/ \+/\t/
s/ \+\([^ ]\+\) *$/\t\1/
s/  \+/\t/

Or, as a one-liner:

sed -e 's/^ *//; s/ \+/\t/; s/ \+/\t/; s/ \+/\t/; s/ \+/\t/; s/ \+/\t/; s/ \+/\t/; s/ \+\([^ ]\+\) *$/\t\1/; s/  \+/\t/'
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I'm hoping to stick to standard utilities for eventual inclusion in a make file or bash script, however. –  Bubnoff Oct 31 '12 at 17:34
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