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Often when iterating through a string (or any enumerable object), we are not only interested in the current value, but also the position (index). To accomplish this by using string::iterator we have to maintain a separate index:

  string str ("Test string");
  string::iterator it;
  int index = 0;
  for ( it = str.begin() ; it < str.end(); it++ ,index++)
  {
         cout << index << *it;
  }

Above style seems does not seem superior to the 'c-style'

  string str ("Test string");
  for ( int i = 0 ; i < str.length(); i++)
  {
         cout << i << str[i] ;
  }

In Ruby, we can get both content and index in a elegant way:

  "hello".split("").each_with_index {|c, i| puts "#{i} , #{c}" }

So, what is the best practice in C++ to iterate through an enumerable object and also keep track of the current index?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 8 down vote accepted

I've never heard of a best practice for this specific question. However, one best practice in general is to use the simplest solution that solves the problem. In this case the array-style access (or c-style if you want to call it that) is the simplest way to iterate while having the index value available. So I would certainly recommend that way.

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Like this:


    std::string s("Test string");
    std::string::iterator it = s.begin();

    //Use the iterator...
    ++it;
    //...

    std::cout << "index is: " << std::distance(s.begin(), it) << std::endl;
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You can use standard STL function distance as mentioned before

index = std::distance(s.begin(), it);

Also, you can access string and some other containers with the c-like interface:

for (i=0;i<string1.length();i++) string1[i];
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btw, in my implementation indexes work much faster that iterators (5x and more) –  Andrew Aug 24 '09 at 1:20

A good practice would be based on readability, e.g.:

string str ("Test string");
string::iterator it;
for (int index = 0, it = str.begin() ; it < str.end(); ++it)
   cout << index++ << *it;

Or:

string str ("Test string");
string::iterator it;
for (int index = 0, it = str.begin() ; it < str.end(); ++it, ++index)
   cout << index << *it;

Or your original:

string str ("Test string");
string::iterator it;
int index = 0;
for (it = str.begin() ; it < str.end(); ++it, ++index)
   cout << index << *it;

Etc. Whatever is easiest and cleanest to you.

It's not clear there is any one best practice as you'll need a counter variable somewhere. The question seems to be whether where you define it and how it is incremented works well for you.

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I would use it-str.begin() In this particular case std::distance and operator- are the same. But if container will change to something without random access, std::distance will increment first argument until it reach second, giving thus linear time and operator- will not compile. Personally I prefer the second behaviour - it's better to be notified when you algorithm from O(n) became O(n^2)...

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For strings, you can use string.c_str() which will return you a const char*, which can be treated as an array, example:

const char* strdata = str.c_str();

for (int i = 0; i < str.length(); ++i)
    cout << i << strdata[i];
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This question is similar to my own so I would rather ask here, how do you compare the value of stardata[i] to " "? Is there a way to convert it to char? –  frogeyedpeas Apr 11 '13 at 14:01

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