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The code is like this:

#!/bin/bash
if [[ foobarbletch =~ 'foo(bar)bl(.*)' ]]
 then
     echo "The regex matches!"
     echo $BASH_REMATCH
     echo ${BASH_REMATCH[1]}
     echo ${BASH_REMATCH[2]}
 fi

When I try to run it, it doesn't display anything:

bash-3.2$ bash --version
GNU bash, version 3.2.48(1)-release (x86_64-apple-darwin12)
Copyright (C) 2007 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
bash-3.2$ /bin/bash test_rematch.bash
bash-3.2$ 

Does anyone have ideas about this? Thanks!

share|improve this question
up vote 26 down vote accepted

In your bash REGEX, you should remove quotes. That's why that doesn't work.

If you have space, I recommend to use this way :

#!/bin/bash
x='foo bar bletch'
if [[ $x =~ foo[[:space:]](bar)[[:space:]]bl(.*) ]]
then
    echo The regex matches!
    echo $BASH_REMATCH      
    echo ${BASH_REMATCH[1]} 
    echo ${BASH_REMATCH[2]} 
fi
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! but what shall I do if spacebar appears in the REGEX without using quotes? – Hanfei Sun Oct 31 '12 at 2:32
    
See my edited post – Gilles Quenot Oct 31 '12 at 2:38
    
@Firegun In addition, you can also represent a space with \ or ' ' or " " (choose your poison) (the first one didn't show up well, it's backslash followed by space) – doubleDown Oct 31 '12 at 4:34
    
You can use quotes, just not around the regular expression metacharacters. For instance, this works: [[ foobarbletch =~ 'foo'('bar')'bl'(.*) ]] So feel free to quote any spaces - just not the whole string. – Mark Reed Sep 30 '15 at 20:57

Thanks to your debugging statement, echo The regex matches!, you should have noticed there is no problem with BASH_REMATCH, since the if statement evaluates to false.

In bash, regular expressions used with =~ are unquoted. If the string on the right is quoted, then it is treated as a string literal.

If you want to include whitespaces in your regex's, then use the appropriate character classes, or escape your space if you want a space.

share|improve this answer

You can also assign the quoted regexp to a variable:

#!/bin/bash

x='foobarbletch'

foobar_re='foo(bar)bl(.*)'

if [[ $x =~ $foobar_re ]] ; then
    echo The regex matches!
    echo ${BASH_REMATCH[*]}
    echo ${BASH_REMATCH[1]}
    echo ${BASH_REMATCH[2]}
fi

This not only supports simple quoting but gives the regexp a name which can help readability.

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