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Ok, there are tons of examples using unit of work with dependency injection for Code First, using generic repositories and all that good stuff.

Does anyone have an example doing this with Database First (edmx with dbContext Generator (T4)), Stored Procedures as Function Imports, Unit of Work with dependency injection.

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1 Answer 1

The context for code first or dbfirst will be the same (DbContext).

Stored procedures are mapped in your repository instead of calling context.Customers you call context.Database.Query("Proc_whatever").

Is there a specific spot you want help on, I may have a code sample for it, but everything above is done the same way as the di, code first, generic repositories, etc. The only change to implement a UnitOfWork is to ensure your repositories don't call SaveChanges, you have a method on your UnitOfWork interface called Save() that in turn calls save changes.

I'll update the code at https://github.com/adamtuliper/EF5-for-Real-Web-Applications to include a unit of work. I dont like the implementation though, something doesn't feel right, and thus is leading me more towards CQRS I believe.

So the idea here is: Inject IUnitOfWork IUnitOfWork contains an IContext which is also injected and mapped to a Context. IUnitOfWork maps to UnitOfWork concrete implementation. UnitOfWork concrete implementation references the repositories:

This is partially off the top of my head, so excuse any compilation errors, it's to show in principle


public class YourContext : DbContext, IContext
{
   //just a regular DbContext class except use IDbSet
   public IDbSet Customers { get; set; }
}

public interface IUnitOfWork
{
     ICustomerRepository CustomerRepository { get; }
     IOrderRepository OrderRepository { get; }
     void Save();
}


 public class UnitOfWork : IUnitOfWork, IDisposable
 {
        private readonly IContext _context;
        private ICustomerRepository _customerRepository;
        private IOrderRepository _orderRepository;
        private bool _disposed = false;

        public UnitOfWork(IContext context)
        {
            _context = context;
        }

        public ICustomerRepository CustomerRepository
        {
            get
            {
                if (this._customerRepository == null)
                {
                    this._customerRepository = new CustomerRepository(_context);
                }
                return _customerRepository;
            }
        }

        protected virtual void Dispose(bool disposing)
        {
            if (!this._disposed)
            {
                if (disposing)
                {
                    ((IDisposable)_context).Dispose();
                }
            }
            this._disposed = true;
        }

        public void Dispose()
        {
            Dispose(true);
            GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
        }

public class CustomerController : Controller
{
   private readonly IUnitOfWork _unitOfWork;
   public CustomerController(IUnitOfWork unitOfWork)
   {
      _unitOfWork = unitOfWork;
   }

   [AutoMap(typeof(Customer), typeof(CustomerIndexViewModel)]
   public ActionResult Index()
   {
        return _unitOfWork.CustomersRepository.GetAll();
        //or if not using AutoMapper, use the viewmodel directly:
        //return _unitOfWork.CustomersRepository.GetAll().Select(c => new CustomerIndexViewModel
                                                    {
                                                        CustomerId = c.CustomerId,
                                                        Address = c.Address,
                                                        City = c.City,
                                                        State = c.State,
                                                        FirstName = c.FirstName,
                                                        LastName = c.LastName
                                                    }).ToArray(); ;
   }
}

To use a proc, in the CustomerRepository you'd do the following:


public Customer GetById(int id)
{
      return this.Context.Database.SqlQuery("Proc_GetCustomer @customerID", new SqlParameter("@customerID", id)).Single();
      //instead of:  return this.Context.Customers.Include(o => o.Orders).Single(o => o.CustomerId == id);
}

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Thank you so much Adam, actually I was reading your blog yesterday and you implementation seems to be the best out of all the ones I'v seen so I'm so happy you answered the question. My goal is to be able to share the context between repository, inject repositoy in a service layer, inject service layer into controllers and be able to do unit testing. DOD only allows stored procedures so it seems to make it so much more complicated and harder to understand. –  Fab Nov 1 '12 at 1:54
    
@Adam Tuliper In this implementation, how would you be able to inject the ICustomerRepository dependency into the UnitOfWork ? Isn't setting CustomerRepository as a property inside the UoW preventing us from injecting that dependency? Thanks. –  Mohammad Sepahvand Jan 16 '13 at 12:35
    
Every time you add new repository into your system, you have to change your UnitOfWork class. I am not comfortable with this approach. –  Usman Khalid Jul 12 '13 at 9:54
    
@UsmanKhalid you could prob simplify further with generics, etc but then I feel its a hack to get around writing a small piece of code. You could shorten this to two lines per repository, and if thats a problem then I have to ask why. If you have many and adding that is an issue, then simply code template it (.tt/t4, etc) to generate it for you. A generic repository could be used here with a collection in a unit of work object, but many dont like the generic repository approach, but some do. If you dont mind a generic repository, you could simplify quite a bit more. –  Adam Tuliper - MSFT Jul 14 '13 at 5:18
    
@AdamTuliper I am not talking about the Generic Repository. I am saying, in this approach, UnitOfWork class is acting as Container of the Repositories. So everytime you need to add new repository into your system, you need to change your UnitOfWork Class as well. I liked the approach given in this link : codeproject.com/Articles/543810/… –  Usman Khalid Jul 14 '13 at 8:49

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