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How should I cast from an Object to an Integer in VB.NET?

When I do:

Dim intMyInteger as Integer = TryCast(MyObject, Integer)

it says:

TryCast operand must be reference type, but Integer is a value type.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

TryCast is the equivalent of C#'s as operator. It is a "safe cast" operator that doesn't throw an exception if the cast fails. Instead, it returns Nothing (null in C#). The problem is, you can't assign Nothing (null) (a reference type) to an Integer (a value type). There is no such thing as an Integer null/Nothing.

Instead, you can use TypeOf and Is:

If TypeOf MyObject Is Integer Then
    intMyInteger = DirectCast(MyObject, Integer)
Else
    intMyInteger = 0
End If

This tests to see if the runtime type of MyObject is Integer. See the MSDN documentation on the TypeOf operator for more details.

You could also write it like this:

Dim myInt As Integer = If(TypeOf myObj Is Integer, DirectCast(myObj,Integer), 0)

Furthermore, if an integer with a default value (like 0) is not suitable, you could consider a Nullable(Of Integer) type.

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Why would the type of MyObject be Integer when we already know it is Object? –  CJ7 Oct 31 '12 at 4:27
1  
We don't already know that. We only know that MyObject is an Object reference. It could still point to an object of any type. The If TypeOf x Is type expression tests the runtime type of the object. –  Jonathon Reinhart Oct 31 '12 at 4:33
    
Do you mean iif rather than if? –  CJ7 Oct 31 '12 at 9:03
    
Thanks for the edit Joel. CJ7, where? I don't know where that is appropriate, or what you're talking about. –  Jonathon Reinhart Oct 31 '12 at 12:43
1  
Lowercase, they mean nothing. Iif is a function, that has been replaced by the If operator in VB 2008. A quick look at the MSDN docs goes a long way. (I'm answering your questions and don't even know Visual Basic.) –  Jonathon Reinhart Oct 31 '12 at 14:38

Use Directcast and catch InvalidCastException

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+1: At first glance, I thought this was not a good alternative, because exceptions are so expensive in .Net. However, OP did state he was expecting an Integer inside the Object; if it is indeed always (or almost always) an Integer, then it makes perfect sense to do the DirectCast, and only catch the (rare) exception. Though personally I use Jonathan's style, having been trained by years of .Net usage to avoid exceptions as "too expensive". Even in situations where they aren't. –  ToolmakerSteve May 8 at 8:18

You can use this:

Dim intMyInteger as Integer

Integer.TryParse(MyObject, intMyInteger)
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The equivalent for TryCast is CType. Both will do a type conversion if it is possible. By contrast, DirectCast will only convert the type if it is that type already.

To illustrate, you can use CType to convert a String, or Short, or Double, to an Integer. DirectCast will generally give you a syntax/compile error if you do that; but if you try to go around the error by using type Object (this is called "boxing" and "unboxing"), it will throw an exception at run-time.

    Dim OnePointTwo As Object = "1.2"
    Try
        Dim temp = CType(OnePointTwo, Integer)
        Console.WriteLine("CType converted to: " & temp.ToString & " (type: " & temp.GetType.ToString & ")")
    Catch ex As Exception
        Console.WriteLine("CType threw exception")
    End Try
    Try
        Dim temp = DirectCast(OnePointTwo, Integer)
        Console.WriteLine("DirectCast converted to: " & temp.ToString & " (type: " & temp.GetType.ToString & ")")
    Catch ex As Exception
        Console.WriteLine("DirectCast threw exception")
    End Try

This will output:

    CType converted to: 1 (type: System.Int32)
    DirectCast threw exception

So to most closely follow the TryCast semantics, I suggest using a function like this:

Shared Function TryCastInteger(value As Object) As Integer?
    Try
        If IsNumeric(value) Then
            Return CType(value, Integer)
        Else
            Return Nothing
        End If
    Catch ex As Exception
        Return Nothing
    End Try
End Function

And to illustrate it's effect:

Shared Sub TestTryCastInteger()
    Dim temp As Integer?

    Dim OnePointTwo As Object = "1.2"
    temp = TryCastInteger(OnePointTwo)
    If temp Is Nothing Then
        Console.WriteLine("Could not convert to Integer")
    Else
        Console.WriteLine("TryCastInteger converted to: " & temp.ToString & " (type: " & temp.GetType.ToString & ")")
    End If

    Dim NotANumber As Object = "bob's your uncle"
    temp = TryCastInteger(NotANumber)
    If temp Is Nothing Then
        Console.WriteLine("Could not convert to Integer")
    Else
        Console.WriteLine("TryCastInteger converted to: " & temp.ToString & " (type: " & temp.GetType.ToString & ")")
    End If
End Sub

Running TestTryCastInteger() will output:

    TryCastInteger converted to: 1 (type: System.Int32)
    Could not convert to Integer

There also is such a thing as a null/Nothing Integer, or any other static type, called a "nullable" type, see variable declaration question mark for some more information. But that does not really make it a "reference" type either.

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-1 for "the equivalent to TryCast is CType". Not really. The entire point of using TryCast is to avoid the possibility of generating an exception at runtime. CType will cause an exception, if the conversion fails. In addition, TryCast does not attempt the full range of conversions that CType attempts. The two are used quite differently. TryCast is a very strict (and fast) conversion: it attempts to "upcast" to a specific subclass. It is used when it was necessary to pass an instance as a more general base class. CType can do many more conversions -- which is good or bad .. –  ToolmakerSteve May 8 at 7:55
    
.. depending on the programmer's intent. It may attempt MUCH more expensive conversions, such as parsing a string. Its behavior can also be overloaded in custom classes, to do anything at all. But even beyond that, the issue in recommending it here, is that you don't have enough information about what OP has in mind. It is a risky recommendation, that could lead to subtle bugs. It really shouldn't be used to cast from "Object", unless a programmer simply doesn't care what is coming in, and what the result will be -- they just "want it to work". The old, unreliable, way of Basic programming. –  ToolmakerSteve May 8 at 7:57
    
In summary, Jonathan is correct, if one's goal is to write a reliable program. If one has no control over the incoming type, and is stuck with an Object declaration, and you are expecting a value type, then the safe way to proceed is to start testing the object's type. Decide what to do, once you know what type of object you have. –  ToolmakerSteve May 8 at 8:01

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