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I have a list of IDs: List<Integer> updatedIds.

I have a master list (say, taken from the DB): List<Records> masterList.

I want to do the following:

  1. For each ID in updatedIds, check if it's in masterList. If not, add the record to the masterList.
  2. For each Record in masterList, check if it's in updatedIds. If not, it is obsolete, so remove it from masterList.

The straightforward code for this is as follows:

for (Integer updId : updatedIds) {
    boolean hasMapping = false;
    for (Record rec : masterList) {
        if (rec.getId() == updId) { hasMapping = true; break; }
    }
    if (!hasMapping) {
        //TODO add updId to masterList
    }
}
for (Record rec : masterList) {
    boolean isObsolete = true;
    for (Integer updId : updatedIds) {
        if (rec.getId() == updId) { isObsolete = false; break; }
    }
    if (isObsolete) {
        //TODO remove rec from masterList
    }
}

The first loop takes care of requirement 1, the second takes care of requirement 2. It looks very inefficient, and I think I may be using the wrong data structure for this kind of task.

Is there a more efficient way of implementing the algorithm above?

share|improve this question
    
for the second loop you can use HashMap.get(updatedId) this would be better –  Bhavik Shah Oct 31 '12 at 5:05
    
why use a map? what would be the value? –  DarthVader Oct 31 '12 at 5:06

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you sort both lists (e.g. using Collections.sort), the updatedIDs in natural order and the masterList ordered by ID, you can set up a single loop to go through both of them. You could possibly retrieve the records in sorted order, if they come from a DB, and skip that step.

Collections.sort(masterList, myComparator);
Collections.sort(updatedIDs);

Iterator m_it = masterList.iterator();
Iterator u_it = updatedIDs.iterator();

// * Some code here to deal with the possibility that either list is empty

Record rec    = m_it.next();
int    u      = u_it.next();
bool   done   = false;

while (! done) {
  if (rec.getID() < u) {
    // rec's ID was missing from updatedIDs
    m_it.remove();

    if (m_it.hasNext()) {
      rec = m_it.next();
    } else {
      done = true;
      // * add u and all subsequent updated IDs to master list
    }
  } else if (rec.getID() > u) {
    // u is new - doesn't occur in masterList
    // * add u to masterList (or probably to a separate list that you
    //   later append to masterList)

    if (u_it.hasNext()) {
      u = u_it.next();
    } else {
      done = true;
      // * remove rec and all remaining records from the master list
    }
  } else {
    // rec's ID matches u: proceed to next pair of items
    bool m_nx = m_it.hasNext(), u_nx = u_it.hasNext();
    if (m_nx && u_nx) {
      rec = m_it.next();
      u = u_it.next();
    } else if ((! m_nx) && (! u_nx)) {
      done = true;
    } else if (m_nx && (! u_nx)) {
      done = true;
      // * remove all subsequent records from the master list
    } else if ((! m_nx) && u_nx) {
      done = true;
      // * add all subsequent integers in updatedIDs to the master list
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer

use HashSet. that will give you a constant time look up. however, each item in your set should be unique. then you can use that number as hashcode as well and you have O(1) lookup whereas in List you have O(n) lookup time.

share|improve this answer
    
Did you mean: use HashSet<Integer> for the second loop? –  Jensen Ching Oct 31 '12 at 5:31

You can HashMap<Integer,Records> instead of List<Records>. Where you will get constant look up O(1). HashMap -> Integer - id and Records - corresponding record.

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