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I have the following code:

for i in range(w[n], W):
    array[n][i] = v[n]

In python this give an out of index error because I am not using append...how would I right the above in order to work in python???

All help will be appreciated! Thank You!

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Where are your arrays? v[n], w[n]? This much information is not enough. –  Rohit Jain Oct 31 '12 at 5:22
    
Are you using NumPy's 2d arrays? –  ninMonkey Oct 31 '12 at 5:24
    
well not even worrying about that really it is just a syntax issue, because i want a two dimensional array like think of it like this: for i in range(0, 10): knap_sac[n][i] = 0 –  user1661211 Oct 31 '12 at 5:24
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

First of all, you shouldn't use the name 'array' for an array. Even though it's not a reserved name in python, it's considered bad programming practice. A way to do what you want is like this:

myArr = [[0 for col in range(n)] for row in range(W)]
for i in range(w[n], W):
            myArr[n][i] = v[n]

The first line creates an array of [n][W] elements initialized to 0. It's the easiest way to achieve this in python without adding an extra dependency.

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No, array isn't a reserved word Python, at least not in 2.7 or 3.3. –  Kirk Strauser Oct 31 '12 at 5:27
    
Perhaps, but it's not a good practice anyway. –  Ionut Hulub Oct 31 '12 at 5:27
    
I'd agree, but mainly because array doesn't describe its real purpose. –  Kirk Strauser Oct 31 '12 at 5:37
    
Thanks I think that fixed it ...I got another error instead of list index out of range now I get list assignment out of range which I think has something to do with the other v[] array... –  user1661211 Oct 31 '12 at 5:37
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