Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to unit test sameness of two instances of one class in Ruby:

def test_example
    a = Object.new
    b = Object.new

    assert_equal a, b
end

I understand that this fails because the instances are distinct variables each with its own memory pointer. What I'm after is to get this test to pass if the instances are identical in all respects but their reference pointers.

Here's a more involved (if contrived) example:

# Let's stir up something...
class FooBar
    attr_accessor :seed, :foo, :bar

    def foo_the_bar()
        @bar = @seed + @foo * 3
    end
end

f = FooBar.new
f.seed = "Mountains "
f.foo  = "are just mountains "
f.bar = "obliterate me!"
f.foo_the_bar
p f.bar # "Mountains are just mountains are just mountains are just mountains "


# So far so good, now let's test if one FooBar is same as another...

require 'test/unit'
class FooBarTest < Test::Unit::TestCase

    # Test fails: <#<FooBar:0x9a40d18>> expected but was <#<FooBar:0x9a40d04>>.
    # But what we really want is a way to make this pass
    # since the objects are exactly the same in every respect,
    # besides their pointers.
    def test_foobar_1_init
        f1 = FooBar.new
        f2 = FooBar.new

        assert_equal f1, f2
    end

    # Again, test fails, but we want it to pass,
    # since the instance variables are the same.
    def test_foobar_2_instance_var
        f1 = FooBar.new
        f2 = FooBar.new

        f1.seed = "Santa says "
        f1.foo = "ho "
        f1.bar = "something"
        f1.foo_the_bar

        f2.seed = f1.seed
        f2.foo = f1.foo
        f2.foo_the_bar

        assert_equal f1, f2
    end

    # This test fails for the wrong reason.
    # We want this to fail because the instance variables are different.
    # This test should also fail if we add a method to one of the instances,
    # or make the instances differ from each some other way.
    def test_foobar_3_diff
        f1 = FooBar.new
        f2 = FooBar.new

        f1.seed = "Kitty goes "
        f1.foo = "meow "
        f1.foo_the_bar

        f2.seed = "Doggies goes "
        f2.foo = "woof "
        f2.foo_the_bar

        assert_equal f1, f2
    end
end
share|improve this question
    
Victor Deryagin's answer is correct. I suggest you also read through skorks.com/2009/09/ruby-equality-and-object-comparison since it contains some more interesting information... –  severin Oct 31 '12 at 11:17
add comment

3 Answers

Just define FooBar#== method:

class FooBar
  def ==(other)
    [bar, seed, foo] == [other.bar, other.seed, other.foo]
  end
end

now test_foobar_1_init and test_foobar_2_instance_var pass, test_foobar_3_diff fails for the right reason.

A downside is when you change object structure, == method needs to be modified accordingly.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply, Victor. However, manually checking equality of all attributes is exactly what I'm trying to avoid. There has to be a better way... Also, this doesn't handle comparison for presence of methods. (For example, one instance can have a new method injected into it that FooBar#== method would not be aware of). –  Arman H Oct 31 '12 at 18:54
add comment

As per the source at apidock, assert_equals first converts objects to string using inspect method. You should define the inspect method for the class FooBar

class FooBar
  def inspect
    # create a unique string of attributes here, maybe a json string.
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
This would be a very crude hack around a weak point in assert_equals. The correct way would be to implement/override == as Victor Deryagin pointed out in his answer. –  severin Oct 31 '12 at 16:56
add comment
f1.attributes.keys.collect(&:to_sym).each do |field|
 assert_equal f1.send(field), f2.send(field)
end

This will assert equality of all the fields. But the downside is the number of assertions. If you dont want that to happen, assign ids to the objects like this

f1.id = 1
f2.id = 1 
assert_equal f1, f2

But be sure not to save the objects which might lead to inconsistencies.

share|improve this answer
    
The attributes method is only available in ActiveRecord models. And ActiveRecord already redefines equality to only consider a record's id instead of its object_id... –  severin Oct 31 '12 at 11:15
    
ok then ! use the first one. The question was for an activerecord right ? Whats the problem in there ? –  littlecegian Oct 31 '12 at 15:36
    
The question is for vanilla Ruby, using Test::Unit standard library, though a valid answer with another testing framework (RSpec, Shoulda) is acceptable too. –  Arman H Oct 31 '12 at 18:59
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.