Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a UIImage that is UIImageOrientationUp (portrait) that I would like to rotate counter-clockwise by 90 degrees (to landscape). I don't want to use a CGAffineTransform. I want the pixels of the UIImage to actually shift position. I am using a block of code (shown below) originally intended to resize a UIImage to do this. I set a target size as the current size of the UIImage but I get an error (Error): CGBitmapContextCreate: invalid data bytes/row: should be at least 1708 for 8 integer bits/component, 3 components, kCGImageAlphaPremultipliedLast. (I don't get an error whenever I provide a SMALLER size as the target size BTW). Can any of you show me how to just ROTATE my UIImage 90 degrees CCW using just core graphics functions while preserving the current size?

-(UIImage*)reverseImageByScalingToSize:(CGSize)targetSize:(UIImage*)anImage
{
    UIImage* sourceImage = anImage; 
    CGFloat targetWidth = targetSize.height;
    CGFloat targetHeight = targetSize.width;

    CGImageRef imageRef = [sourceImage CGImage];
    CGBitmapInfo bitmapInfo = CGImageGetBitmapInfo(imageRef);
    CGColorSpaceRef colorSpaceInfo = CGImageGetColorSpace(imageRef);

    if (bitmapInfo == kCGImageAlphaNone) {
    	bitmapInfo = kCGImageAlphaNoneSkipLast;
    }

    CGContextRef bitmap;

    if (sourceImage.imageOrientation == UIImageOrientationUp || sourceImage.imageOrientation == UIImageOrientationDown) {
    	bitmap = CGBitmapContextCreate(NULL, targetHeight, targetWidth, CGImageGetBitsPerComponent(imageRef), CGImageGetBytesPerRow(imageRef), colorSpaceInfo, bitmapInfo);

    } else {


    	bitmap = CGBitmapContextCreate(NULL, targetWidth, targetHeight, CGImageGetBitsPerComponent(imageRef), CGImageGetBytesPerRow(imageRef), colorSpaceInfo, bitmapInfo);

    }       


    if (sourceImage.imageOrientation == UIImageOrientationRight) {
    	CGContextRotateCTM (bitmap, radians(90));
    	CGContextTranslateCTM (bitmap, 0, -targetHeight);

    } else if (sourceImage.imageOrientation == UIImageOrientationLeft) {
    	CGContextRotateCTM (bitmap, radians(-90));
    	CGContextTranslateCTM (bitmap, -targetWidth, 0);

    } else if (sourceImage.imageOrientation == UIImageOrientationDown) {
    	// NOTHING
    } else if (sourceImage.imageOrientation == UIImageOrientationUp) {
    	CGContextRotateCTM (bitmap, radians(90));
    	CGContextTranslateCTM (bitmap, 0, -targetHeight);
    }

    CGContextDrawImage(bitmap, CGRectMake(0, 0, targetWidth, targetHeight), imageRef);
    CGImageRef ref = CGBitmapContextCreateImage(bitmap);
    UIImage* newImage = [UIImage imageWithCGImage:ref];

    CGContextRelease(bitmap);
    CGImageRelease(ref);

    return newImage; 
}
share|improve this question
    
I found another useful link.. Hope this helps some one.. mobiledevelopertips.com/user-interface/… –  Dilip Rajkumar Jan 1 '13 at 14:09
    
THE solution .......... stackoverflow.com/questions/5427656/… –  Joe Blow May 18 at 9:36

12 Answers 12

up vote 49 down vote accepted

What about something like:

static inline double radians (double degrees) {return degrees * M_PI/180;}
UIImage* rotate(UIImage* src, UIImageOrientation orientation)
{
    UIGraphicsBeginImageContext(src.size);

    CGContextRef context = UIGraphicsGetCurrentContext();

    if (orientation == UIImageOrientationRight) {
        CGContextRotateCTM (context, radians(90));
    } else if (orientation == UIImageOrientationLeft) {
        CGContextRotateCTM (context, radians(-90));
    } else if (orientation == UIImageOrientationDown) {
        // NOTHING
    } else if (orientation == UIImageOrientationUp) {
        CGContextRotateCTM (context, radians(90));
    }

    [src drawAtPoint:CGPointMake(0, 0)];

    UIImage *image = UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext();
    UIGraphicsEndImageContext();
    return image;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
My comment was that drawAtPoint may have to be called after the call to set the proper RotateCTM. Try moving drawAtPoint to just before UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext –  fbrereto Aug 23 '09 at 6:52
2  
how do i use this method on iphone –  Rahul Vyas Sep 30 '09 at 6:59
7  
static inline double radians (double degrees) {return degrees * M_PI/180;} –  Grouchal Apr 12 '10 at 14:24
3  
This would not work on a background thread. UIGraphicsGetCurrentContext() is not thread-safe and should only be called on the main (UI) thread. –  Chris R. Donnelly Jun 24 '10 at 14:25
2  
In iOS 4 and later, you may call UIGraphicsGetCurrentContext function from any thread of your app. –  bentford Aug 27 '13 at 17:51

I believe the easiest way (and thread safe too) is to do:

//assume that the image is loaded in landscape mode from disk
UIImage * LandscapeImage = [UIImage imageNamed: imgname];
UIImage * PortraitImage = [[UIImage alloc] initWithCGImage: LandscapeImage.CGImage
                                                     scale: 1.0
                                               orientation: UIImageOrientationLeft];

Note: As Brainware said this only modifies the orientation data of the image - the pixel data is untouched. For some applications, this may not be enough.

share|improve this answer
5  
+1 Perfect! ..... –  bentford Dec 6 '11 at 19:54
8  
Great! this one should be marked as best answer :) –  Tieme May 8 '12 at 12:43
    
when I try to access PortraitImage.imageOrientation after doing this, XCode gives me a "bad access" error –  yourfriendzak Jun 8 '12 at 19:21
1  
Make it more general: UIImage * origImg = [UIImage imageNamed:@"1.JPG"]; UIImage* fixed=[UIImage imageWithCGImage:[origImg CGImage] scale:1.0 orientation:origImg.imageOrientation]; –  Cullen SUN Aug 2 '13 at 10:23
2  
This doesn't actually rotate the image. It makes a copy of the image and sets the imageOrientation bits of the imageFlags property of the image to 0, 1, 2, or 3. Some classes ignore these flags such as the UIActivityViewController. If you really need the image rotated, then see Ben Groot's answer which Hardy Macia's UIImage extension. –  Brainware Sep 18 '13 at 23:44

Check out the simple and awesome code of Hardy Macia at: cutting-scaling-and-rotating-uiimages

Just call

UIImage *rotatedImage = [originalImage imageRotatedByDegrees:90.0];

Thanks Hardy Macia!

Header:

  • (UIImage *)imageAtRect:(CGRect)rect;
  • (UIImage *)imageByScalingProportionallyToMinimumSize:(CGSize)targetSize;
  • (UIImage *)imageByScalingProportionallyToSize:(CGSize)targetSize;
  • (UIImage *)imageByScalingToSize:(CGSize)targetSize;
  • (UIImage *)imageRotatedByRadians:(CGFloat)radians;
  • (UIImage *)imageRotatedByDegrees:(CGFloat)degrees;
share|improve this answer
7  
Please down vote WITH some arguments! –  Ben Groot Jun 5 '11 at 10:02
2  
I've only used the rotation method but I found it really helpful, thanks for the link! –  bennythemink Sep 12 '11 at 4:43
1  
This worked better for me as well because I was drawing into a context and the above solutions only worked for UI* views. Again only using rotating. –  Jonny Jun 22 '12 at 6:55
3  
Thanks Hardy Macia! :) –  touti Jun 29 '12 at 8:09
2  
Have been searching for a solution to image rotation issue for last few days. I tried all the answers as described above and this is the only one that works for me. –  BlueChips23 Sep 13 '12 at 3:17

A thread safe rotation function is the following (it works much better):

-(UIImage*)imageByRotatingImage:(UIImage*)initImage fromImageOrientation:(UIImageOrientation)orientation
{
CGImageRef imgRef = initImage.CGImage;

CGFloat width = CGImageGetWidth(imgRef);
CGFloat height = CGImageGetHeight(imgRef);

CGAffineTransform transform = CGAffineTransformIdentity;
CGRect bounds = CGRectMake(0, 0, width, height);
CGSize imageSize = CGSizeMake(CGImageGetWidth(imgRef), CGImageGetHeight(imgRef));
CGFloat boundHeight;
UIImageOrientation orient = orientation;
switch(orient) {

    case UIImageOrientationUp: //EXIF = 1
        return initImage;
        break;

    case UIImageOrientationUpMirrored: //EXIF = 2
        transform = CGAffineTransformMakeTranslation(imageSize.width, 0.0);
        transform = CGAffineTransformScale(transform, -1.0, 1.0);
        break;

    case UIImageOrientationDown: //EXIF = 3
        transform = CGAffineTransformMakeTranslation(imageSize.width, imageSize.height);
        transform = CGAffineTransformRotate(transform, M_PI);
        break;

    case UIImageOrientationDownMirrored: //EXIF = 4
        transform = CGAffineTransformMakeTranslation(0.0, imageSize.height);
        transform = CGAffineTransformScale(transform, 1.0, -1.0);
        break;

    case UIImageOrientationLeftMirrored: //EXIF = 5
        boundHeight = bounds.size.height;
        bounds.size.height = bounds.size.width;
        bounds.size.width = boundHeight;
        transform = CGAffineTransformMakeTranslation(imageSize.height, imageSize.width);
        transform = CGAffineTransformScale(transform, -1.0, 1.0);
        transform = CGAffineTransformRotate(transform, 3.0 * M_PI / 2.0);
        break;

    case UIImageOrientationLeft: //EXIF = 6
        boundHeight = bounds.size.height;
        bounds.size.height = bounds.size.width;
        bounds.size.width = boundHeight;
        transform = CGAffineTransformMakeTranslation(0.0, imageSize.width);
        transform = CGAffineTransformRotate(transform, 3.0 * M_PI / 2.0);
        break;

    case UIImageOrientationRightMirrored: //EXIF = 7
        boundHeight = bounds.size.height;
        bounds.size.height = bounds.size.width;
        bounds.size.width = boundHeight;
        transform = CGAffineTransformMakeScale(-1.0, 1.0);
        transform = CGAffineTransformRotate(transform, M_PI / 2.0);
        break;

    case UIImageOrientationRight: //EXIF = 8
        boundHeight = bounds.size.height;
        bounds.size.height = bounds.size.width;
        bounds.size.width = boundHeight;
        transform = CGAffineTransformMakeTranslation(imageSize.height, 0.0);
        transform = CGAffineTransformRotate(transform, M_PI / 2.0);
        break;

    default:
        [NSException raise:NSInternalInconsistencyException format:@"Invalid image orientation"];

}
// Create the bitmap context
CGContextRef    context = NULL;
void *          bitmapData;
int             bitmapByteCount;
int             bitmapBytesPerRow;

// Declare the number of bytes per row. Each pixel in the bitmap in this
// example is represented by 4 bytes; 8 bits each of red, green, blue, and
// alpha.
bitmapBytesPerRow   = (bounds.size.width * 4);
bitmapByteCount     = (bitmapBytesPerRow * bounds.size.height);
bitmapData = malloc( bitmapByteCount );
if (bitmapData == NULL)
{
    return nil;
}

// Create the bitmap context. We want pre-multiplied ARGB, 8-bits
// per component. Regardless of what the source image format is
// (CMYK, Grayscale, and so on) it will be converted over to the format
// specified here by CGBitmapContextCreate.
CGColorSpaceRef colorspace = CGImageGetColorSpace(imgRef);
context = CGBitmapContextCreate (bitmapData,bounds.size.width,bounds.size.height,8,bitmapBytesPerRow,
                                 colorspace, kCGBitmapAlphaInfoMask & kCGImageAlphaPremultipliedLast);

if (context == NULL)
    // error creating context
    return nil;

CGContextScaleCTM(context, -1.0, -1.0);
CGContextTranslateCTM(context, -bounds.size.width, -bounds.size.height);

CGContextConcatCTM(context, transform);

// Draw the image to the bitmap context. Once we draw, the memory
// allocated for the context for rendering will then contain the
// raw image data in the specified color space.
CGContextDrawImage(context, CGRectMake(0,0,width, height), imgRef);

CGImageRef imgRef2 = CGBitmapContextCreateImage(context);
CGContextRelease(context);
free(bitmapData);
UIImage * image = [UIImage imageWithCGImage:imgRef2 scale:initImage.scale orientation:UIImageOrientationUp];
CGImageRelease(imgRef2);
return image;
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks it worked for me as i had to do additional functionalities on the rotated image like adding brightness and contrast. –  Leena Nov 29 '11 at 8:40
    
There's a problem with your code... It adds a weird white frame around the image on UIImageOrientationDown. –  iosfreak Apr 5 '12 at 20:58
    
Thanks a lot .works like charm. –  Prerna chavan Dec 14 '12 at 7:00
    
Thanks exactly what i want. To call this yourImageView = [self imageByRotatingImage:resultImageView.image fromImageOrientation:UIImageOrientationLeft]; –  BigAppleBump Jun 24 '13 at 16:16
    
You don't want that call to CGColorSpaceRelease(colorspace), see stackoverflow.com/questions/5269815/… –  Seth Spitzer Apr 17 at 21:10

As strange as this seems, the following code solved the problem for me:

+ (UIImage*)unrotateImage:(UIImage*)image {
    CGSize size = image.size;
    UIGraphicsBeginImageContext(size);
    [image drawInRect:CGRectMake(0,0,size.width ,size.height)];
    UIImage* newImage = UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext();
    UIGraphicsEndImageContext();

    return newImage;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Why??? Why does it work? –  Dumoko Nov 27 '12 at 16:34
    
For me it did the trick. –  Stavash Nov 28 '12 at 7:16
    
For me as well, and that's why i am so surprised. –  Dumoko Nov 28 '12 at 9:08
3  
It works because the image orientation is not preserved once you draw in rect. –  Mercurial Sep 12 '13 at 13:13
5  
Why ruin the magic? ;) –  Stavash Sep 12 '13 at 13:32

I had trouble with ll of the above, including the approved answer. I converted Hardy's category back into a method since all i wanted was to rotate an image. Here's the code and usage:

- (UIImage *)imageRotatedByDegrees:(UIImage*)oldImage deg:(CGFloat)degrees{
// calculate the size of the rotated view's containing box for our drawing space
UIView *rotatedViewBox = [[UIView alloc] initWithFrame:CGRectMake(0,0,oldImage.size.width, oldImage.size.height)];
CGAffineTransform t = CGAffineTransformMakeRotation(degrees * M_PI / 180);
rotatedViewBox.transform = t;
CGSize rotatedSize = rotatedViewBox.frame.size;
// Create the bitmap context
UIGraphicsBeginImageContext(rotatedSize);
CGContextRef bitmap = UIGraphicsGetCurrentContext();

// Move the origin to the middle of the image so we will rotate and scale around the center.
CGContextTranslateCTM(bitmap, rotatedSize.width/2, rotatedSize.height/2);

//   // Rotate the image context
CGContextRotateCTM(bitmap, (degrees * M_PI / 180));

// Now, draw the rotated/scaled image into the context
CGContextScaleCTM(bitmap, 1.0, -1.0);
CGContextDrawImage(bitmap, CGRectMake(-oldImage.size.width / 2, -oldImage.size.height / 2, oldImage.size.width, oldImage.size.height), [oldImage CGImage]);

UIImage *newImage = UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext();
UIGraphicsEndImageContext();
return newImage;
}

And the usage:

UIImage *image2 = [self imageRotatedByDegrees:image deg:90];

Thanks Hardy!

share|improve this answer
    
way to go. could be improved if only needs to do 90/-90/180. Anyway, you can update the code for retina display by using "UIGraphicsBeginImageContextWithOptions(rotatedSize, NO, 0);" –  Vinzius Dec 21 '13 at 21:36
    
This worked for me, thanks! –  Clifton Labrum Dec 28 '13 at 4:03

I like the simple elegance of Peter Sarnowski's answer, but it can cause problems when you can't rely on EXIF metadata and the like. In situations where you need to rotate the actual image data I would recommend something like this:

- (UIImage *)rotateImage:(UIImage *) img
{
    CGSize imgSize = [img size];
    UIGraphicsBeginImageContext(imgSize);
    CGContextRef context = UIGraphicsGetCurrentContext();
    CGContextRotateCTM(context, M_PI_2);
    CGContextTranslateCTM(context, 0, -640);
    [img drawInRect:CGRectMake(0, 0, imgSize.height, imgSize.width)];
    UIImage *newImage = UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext();
    UIGraphicsEndImageContext();
    return newImage;
}

The above code takes an image whose orientation is Landscape (can't remember if it's Landscape Left or Landscape Right) and rotates it into Portrait. It is an example which can be modified for your needs.

The key arguments you would have to play with are CGContextRotateCTM(context, M_PI_2) where you decide how much you want to rotate by, but then you have to make sure the picture still draws on the screen using CGContextTranslateCTM(context, 0, -640). This last part is quite important to make sure you see the image and not a blank screen.

For more info check out the source.

share|improve this answer

If you want to add a photo rotate button that'll keep rotating the photo in 90 degree increments, here you go. (finalImage is a UIImage that's already been created elsewhere.)

- (void)rotatePhoto {
    UIImage *rotatedImage;

    if (finalImage.imageOrientation == UIImageOrientationRight)
        rotatedImage = [[UIImage alloc] initWithCGImage: finalImage.CGImage
                                              scale: 1.0
                                        orientation: UIImageOrientationDown];
    else if (finalImage.imageOrientation == UIImageOrientationDown)
        rotatedImage = [[UIImage alloc] initWithCGImage: finalImage.CGImage
                                              scale: 1.0
                                        orientation: UIImageOrientationLeft];
    else if (finalImage.imageOrientation == UIImageOrientationLeft)
        rotatedImage = [[UIImage alloc] initWithCGImage: finalImage.CGImage
                                              scale: 1.0
                                        orientation: UIImageOrientationUp];
    else
        rotatedImage = [[UIImage alloc] initWithCGImage: finalImage.CGImage
                                                     scale: 1.0
                                               orientation: UIImageOrientationRight];
    finalImage = rotatedImage;
}
share|improve this answer

I try this code, it works, and took from http://www.catamount.com/blog/1015/uiimage-extensions-for-cutting-scaling-and-rotating-uiimages/

+ (UIImage *)rotateImage:(UIImage*)src byRadian:(CGFloat)radian
{
    // calculate the size of the rotated view's containing box for our drawing space
    UIView *rotatedViewBox = [[UIView alloc] initWithFrame:CGRectMake(0,0, src.size.width, src.size.height)];
    CGAffineTransform t = CGAffineTransformMakeRotation(radian);
    rotatedViewBox.transform = t;
    CGSize rotatedSize = rotatedViewBox.frame.size;

    // Create the bitmap context
    UIGraphicsBeginImageContext(rotatedSize);
    CGContextRef bitmap = UIGraphicsGetCurrentContext();

    // Move the origin to the middle of the image so we will rotate and scale around the center.
    CGContextTranslateCTM(bitmap, rotatedSize.width/2, rotatedSize.height/2);

    //   // Rotate the image context
    CGContextRotateCTM(bitmap, radian);

    // Now, draw the rotated/scaled image into the context
    CGContextScaleCTM(bitmap, 1.0, -1.0);
    CGContextDrawImage(bitmap, CGRectMake(-src.size.width / 2, -src.size.height / 2, src.size.width, src.size.height), [src CGImage]);

    UIImage *newImage = UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext();
    UIGraphicsEndImageContext();
    return newImage;
}
share|improve this answer

resize-a-uiimage-the-right-way explains some of the issues many code samples for doing this have, and has some code snippets to help deal with UIImages - the private helper method in UIImage+resize.m accepts a transform to allow rotation, so you'd just need to expose that as a public interface.

// Returns a copy of the image that has been transformed using the given affine transform and scaled to the new size
// The new image's orientation will be UIImageOrientationUp, regardless of the current image's orientation
// If the new size is not integral, it will be rounded up
- (UIImage *)resizedImage:(CGSize)newSize
                transform:(CGAffineTransform)transform
           drawTransposed:(BOOL)transpose
     interpolationQuality:(CGInterpolationQuality)quality {
    CGRect newRect = CGRectIntegral(CGRectMake(0, 0, newSize.width, newSize.height));
    CGRect transposedRect = CGRectMake(0, 0, newRect.size.height, newRect.size.width);
    CGImageRef imageRef = self.CGImage;

    // Build a context that's the same dimensions as the new size
    CGContextRef bitmap = CGBitmapContextCreate(NULL,
                                                newRect.size.width,
                                                newRect.size.height,
                                                CGImageGetBitsPerComponent(imageRef),
                                                0,
                                                CGImageGetColorSpace(imageRef),
                                                CGImageGetBitmapInfo(imageRef));

    // Rotate and/or flip the image if required by its orientation
    CGContextConcatCTM(bitmap, transform);

    // Set the quality level to use when rescaling
    CGContextSetInterpolationQuality(bitmap, quality);

    // Draw into the context; this scales the image
    CGContextDrawImage(bitmap, transpose ? transposedRect : newRect, imageRef);

    // Get the resized image from the context and a UIImage
    CGImageRef newImageRef = CGBitmapContextCreateImage(bitmap);
    UIImage *newImage = [UIImage imageWithCGImage:newImageRef];

    // Clean up
    CGContextRelease(bitmap);
    CGImageRelease(newImageRef);

    return newImage;
}

This is the license from that file:

// Created by Trevor Harmon on 8/5/09.
// Free for personal or commercial use, with or without modification.
// No warranty is expressed or implied.
share|improve this answer

There is a extremely efficient UIImage category named NYXImagesKit. It uses vDSP, CoreImage and vImage to be as fast as possible. It has a UIImage+Rotating category that saved my day :)

https://github.com/Nyx0uf/NYXImagesKit

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.