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Here's a little Brownian motion demo in WPF:

using System;
using System.Windows;
using System.Windows.Controls;
using System.Windows.Media;
using System.Windows.Shapes;
using System.Windows.Threading;
using System.Threading;

namespace WpfBrownianMotion
{
    static class MiscUtils
    {
        public static double Clamp(this double n, int low, double high)
        {
            return Math.Min(Math.Max(n, low), high);
        }
    }

    public partial class MainWindow : Window
    {
        public MainWindow()
        {
            InitializeComponent();

            Width = 500;
            Height = 500;

            var canvas = new Canvas();

            Content = canvas;

            var transform = new TranslateTransform(250, 250);

            var circle = new Ellipse()
            {
                Width = 25,
                Height = 25,
                Fill = Brushes.PowderBlue,
                RenderTransform = transform
            };

            canvas.Children.Add(circle);

            var random = new Random();

            var thread =
                new Thread(
                    () =>
                    {
                        while (true)
                        {
                            Dispatcher.Invoke(
                                DispatcherPriority.Normal,
                                (ThreadStart)delegate()
                                {
                                    transform.X += -1 + random.Next(3);
                                    transform.Y += -1 + random.Next(3);

                                    transform.X = transform.X.Clamp(0, 499);
                                    transform.Y = transform.Y.Clamp(0, 499);
                                });
                        }
                    });

            thread.Start();

            Closed += (s, e) => thread.Abort();
        }
    }
}

My question is this. In cases like this where the standard WPF animation facility isn't being used, is the above approach using Thread and Dispatcher the recommended approach to take?

In general, I sometimes have states that need to be updated and rendered and the animation facility isn't a good fit. So I need a way to do the update and rendering in a separate thread. Just wondering if the above approach is the Right Thing.

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You might also take a look into frame-based rendering. –  Clemens Oct 31 '12 at 8:19
    
In your example, all that is done in the extra thread is to invoke and wait for an action that takes place in the UI thread. All actual work is still done in the UI thread. This approach would only make sense if long running calculation were performed by the extra thread and then Dispatcher.Invoke would be called with the results of the calculation. –  Clemens Oct 31 '12 at 8:20
1  
If the calculation is as simple as in your example, why not simply use a DispatcherTimer instead? In contrast to your approach it offers control over how frequently your update/render code is called. –  Clemens Oct 31 '12 at 8:31
    
@Clemens DispatcherTimer looks like the way to go. Thanks! I've added an answer which demonstrates that approach. –  dharmatech Nov 1 '12 at 12:36
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1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Clemens in the comments above suggested using DispatcherTimer. Indeed, this does simplify the code quite a bit. Here's a version taking that approach:

using System;
using System.Windows;
using System.Windows.Controls;
using System.Windows.Media;
using System.Windows.Shapes;
using System.Windows.Threading;

namespace WpfBrownianMotion
{
    static class MiscUtils
    {
        public static double Clamp(this double n, int low, double high)
        {
            return Math.Min(Math.Max(n, low), high);
        }
    }

    public partial class MainWindow : Window
    {
        public MainWindow()
        {
            InitializeComponent();

            Width = 500;
            Height = 500;

            var canvas = new Canvas();

            Content = canvas;

            var transform = new TranslateTransform(250, 250);

            var circle = new Ellipse()
            {
                Width = 25,
                Height = 25,
                Fill = Brushes.PowderBlue,
                RenderTransform = transform
            };

            canvas.Children.Add(circle);

            var random = new Random();

            var timer = new DispatcherTimer();

            timer.Tick += (s, e) =>
                {
                    transform.X += -1 + random.Next(3);
                    transform.Y += -1 + random.Next(3);

                    transform.X = transform.X.Clamp(0, 499);
                    transform.Y = transform.Y.Clamp(0, 499);
                };

            timer.Start();
        }
    }
}
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