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I was wondering if there is any significant advantages/disadvantages between implementing a class using Java generic programming and keeping the types as general Object class? Maybe the codes below clarifies what I am looking for?

This first code shows the use of general Object class type to implement a list:

public class myList {
private static int DEFAULT_CAPACITY = 16;
private int size, capacity;
private Object[] dataArray;

myList(){
    this(DEFAULT_CAPACITY); 
}
myList(int defaultSize){
    capacity = defaultSize;
    size = 0;
    dataArray =new Object[defaultSize];
}
public int getSize(){return size;}
public void insert(int loc, Object o){
    if (size+1 <= capacity){
        for (int i=size; i> loc-1; i--)
            dataArray[i] = dataArray[i-1];
        dataArray[loc-1] = o;
        size++;
    }
}
public Object getItem(int loc){
    return dataArray[loc-1];
}
}

and the following code shows the same functionality using Java generic programming:

public class MyList<E> {
private int size = 0;
private static final int DEFAULT_CAPACITY = 10;
private Object dataArray[];

public MyList() {
   dataArray = new Object[DEFAULT_CAPACITY];
}

public void insert(int loc, E e) {
if (size+1 <= capacity){
   for (int i=size; i> loc-1; i--)
    dataArray[i] = dataArray[i-1];
   dataArray[loc-1] = e;
   size++;
}
}
public E get(int loc) {
   return (E) elements[loc-1];
}
} 
share|improve this question
3  
You should go over your questions and accept some answers, so that people will answer your questions in the future. –  user647772 Oct 31 '12 at 9:09
2  
I just did it. thanx –  reza Oct 31 '12 at 9:28

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The advantage with the Generic approach is this:
Say that you create a list of Integer.
With the Generic approach, if you try to put something else into the list, you will get an error at compile time.
With the Object approach, you will not see this error until runtime, which is a recipe for really hard-to-find bugs.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, now I know another reason. –  Lews Therin Oct 31 '12 at 9:13
3  
Indeed, that's the main reason that generics were born for. When you have a Collection<Point> points; and do points.add(points); instead of points.add(point); this typo can result in a ClassCastException that you may never encounter during program testing (depending on the program flow), or a compile-time error that you are guaranteed to get. The code is also more descriptive and thus more readable. The same idea of moving error-checking to compile-time was behind the type-safe enums and the enhanced for loop, that were introduced in Java 5 as well. –  ignis Oct 31 '12 at 9:15
    
so in summary, it is usually better to go with Generic approach in order to push the type-checking to compile time? –  reza Oct 31 '12 at 9:30
    
@reza: Yes, that is correct. Also, the added benefit of more maintainable code is very important. –  Keppil Oct 31 '12 at 9:32

First your generic MyList<E>'s dataArray should be generic.

class MyList<E> {
     private E dataArray[];
     public MyList(Class<E> c,int size) {
         dataArray  = (E[]) Array.newInstance(c,size);
    }
 }

Advantage - your List will be type safe in nature means in general object type you can add any type which could be caused problematic when you do operation like sorting etc...

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Let me break this up for u...............

- Generics can be implemented to class, interface, methods, fields but its most important usage is for making the Collection type safe.

- This is how Collections are made type-safed in Java, so a wrong type doesn't enter into the Collection, As collection are checked only during the Compilation time and Not during the Runtime.. ie a Cat object should not enter into a Collection of type Dog.

- There is a process known as Erasure, where the compiler removes the Type Parameters and Type Arguments from the Generics class during Compilation time, making it of Raw type during the Run-Time, In order to maintain a backward compatibility with the code that were written WithOut Generics.

Eg:

Box<String> becomes Box

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The important keyword is "Design by Contract". Generics allow you to validate the contract "the elements in this list have this type" even before compilation - all you need is your abstract syntax tree. Type validation is imo the major advantage of strongly typed languages.

It also makes code completion and refractorings easier.

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