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I have two table,their structure are below :

CREATE TABLE  `metaservice`.`user` (
  `id` bigint(18) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `userId` bigint(18) NOT NULL,
  `name` varchar(40) DEFAULT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
  UNIQUE KEY `userId` (`userId`) USING BTREE,
  KEY `nameIndex` (`name`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB AUTO_INCREMENT=0 DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

CREATE TABLE  `metaservice`.`tweet` (
  `id` bigint(18) NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `tweetId` bigint(18) NOT NULL,
  `reqId` int(8) NOT NULL DEFAULT '0',
  `postedTime` datetime NOT NULL,
  `body` text NOT NULL,
  `userId` bigint(18) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`),
  KEY `FK69A46713BA64537` (`userId`),
  KEY `reqId` (`reqId`),
  CONSTRAINT `FK69A46713BA64537` FOREIGN KEY (`userId`) REFERENCES `user` (`userId`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB AUTO_INCREMENT=0 DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

I got this sql query below:

select
        count(distinct user.name) as c 
    from
        tweet as tweet 
    inner join
        user as user 
            on tweet.userId=user.userId  
            and tweet.reqId in (
                327774,
            215173,
            104302,
            239188,
            317122,
            972632,
            424187,
            644254,
            946792,
            543258)

It is too slowly when the tweet table have 6W records and the user table have 6w+ records This query return result:60594 in 10.45sec

share|improve this question
    
What is your question ? –  Grisha Oct 31 '12 at 9:37
1  
The question is probably 'Why' + 'Mysql run slowly when use count(distinct) and join' –  GolezTrol Oct 31 '12 at 9:38
    
did you check whether you have proper indexes on ID column in both the tables? –  AnandPhadke Oct 31 '12 at 9:38
    
does it make any difference to move out the IN clause to a WHERE from a JOIN? –  nawfal Oct 31 '12 at 9:39

4 Answers 4

I would suggest you use EXPLAIN as follows:

EXPLAIN select
        count(distinct user.name) as c 
    from
        tweet as tweet 
    inner join
        user as user 
            on tweet.userId=user.userId  
            and tweet.reqId in (
                327774,
            215173,
            104302,
            239188,
            317122,
            972632,
            424187,
            644254,
            946792,
            543258)

Then analyse the response that EXPLAIN gives you. More information on MySQL explain can be found with these sources:

MySQL Explain Syntax

Optimize Queries with Explain

Using MySQL Explain

MySQL Explain Reference

Once you have looked at the results you'll then need to decide which columns you should be indexing.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks,I have tried but it looks still so slow. I created index username on table user and index reqId on table tweet.But the optimizer of mysql didn't use index on tweet. –  milkis Nov 1 '12 at 6:08
    
Have you made an index on userId? –  ajtrichards Nov 1 '12 at 8:55
    
yes,userId is an unique key using BTREE –  milkis Nov 1 '12 at 18:32
    
It might be the size of the dataset –  ajtrichards Nov 1 '12 at 19:06

try this:

select count(*) as c from (
select
       user.name 
    from
        tweet as tweet 
    inner join
        user as user 
            on tweet.userId=user.userId  
            and tweet.reqId in (
                327774,
            215173,
            104302,
            239188,
            317122,
            972632,
            424187,
            644254,
            946792,
            543258)
group by user.name) a
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks,I have tried but it looks still so slow –  milkis Oct 31 '12 at 9:51

I suggest you to index your keys. Indexes are not just for the primary keys or the unique keys. If there are any columns in your table that you will search by, you should almost always index them.

Also read that Link

share|improve this answer

Try this one -

SELECT
  COUNT(DISTINCT user.name) AS c
FROM
  tweet AS tweet
INNER JOIN user AS user
  ON tweet.userId = user.userId
INNER JOIN (
    SELECT 327774 AS reqId UNION
    SELECT 215173 UNION
    SELECT 104302 UNION
    SELECT 239188 UNION
    SELECT 317122 UNION
    SELECT 972632 UNION
    SELECT 424187 UNION
    SELECT 644254 UNION
    SELECT 946792 UNION
    SELECT 543258
  ) t
  ON tweet.reqId  = t.reqId;
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks,I have tried but it looks still so slow. I created index username on table user and index reqId on table tweet.But the optimizer of mysql didn't use index on tweet. –  milkis Nov 1 '12 at 6:06

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