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Within my Visual Studio solution I have a web site and 4-5 class library projects which are referenced., some of which reference external third party assemblies as well.

I've been given the task of signing the assemblies for these projects.

My understanding is that the purpose of signing is that not everyone being able to use our assembly without providing its public key and version details, right?

Should I use one single Strong Name Key (.snk) to sign all the assemblies of these projects or each assembly should be signed with a separate strong name key?

What's the purpose of password protection for strong name keys?

How would you do that?

Many thanks,

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The purpose to sign assemblies is to ensure they're original unmodified versions. Everyone will be free to use them (for licensing there are other tools used in conjunction with signing) but they can be sure that they has not been modified (for example by malicious software) and they come from you (because the private key used for signing is...private). –  Adriano Repetti Oct 31 '12 at 10:17
    
Adriano is correct see... msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/h4fa028b.aspx For how see... msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/xc31ft41.aspx –  Kevin Oct 31 '12 at 10:19

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that the purpose of signing is that not everyone being able to use our assembly without providing its public key and version details, right?

No. Signing verifies you, the publisher. It prevents others from making 'fake' versions of your assemblies.

Should I use one single Strong Name Key (.snk) to sign all the assemblies of these projects or each assembly should be signed with a separate strong name key?

The key is your signature so use 1 for all your projects.

What's the purpose of password protection for strong name keys?

The whole signing process hinges on you being the only one who possesses the key. There is no certificate involved. Partial signing and protected keys can help you limit the number of people who have access to the key.

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thanks. where should the .snk file be stored then? It doesn't need to be put on the production server, right? –  The Light Oct 31 '12 at 10:46
    
The key will be needed on/by the Build server. –  Henk Holterman Oct 31 '12 at 10:49
    
could I not reference other third party assemblies which are not signed? It's giving me an error Error 1 Assembly generation failed -- Referenced assembly 'NameOfThirdPartyAssembly' does not have a strong name. –  The Light Oct 31 '12 at 11:13
    
Correct, all underlying assemblies have to be signed too. Worst case you'll have to sign those 3rd party libs. –  Henk Holterman Oct 31 '12 at 11:23
    
Just to expand on @Henks response re: sub-assemblies being unsigned... There's no point signing your code if code it relies on can be changed - eg your code thinks it's calling a GetUserDetails() method froma 3rd party which has been swapped for a ReformatHardDisk() in a faked assembly pretending to be from the 3rd party. Signing ensures that all code from that point on is the code that you, the publisher, intended to be executing. –  Basic Jul 22 '13 at 21:43

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