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Microsoft should have implemented something snappy for INotifyPropertyChanged, like in the automatic properties, just specify {get; set; notify;} I think it makes a lot of sense to do it. Or are there any complications to do it?

Can we ourselves implement something like 'notify' in our properties. Is there a graceful solution for implementing INotifyPropertyChanged in your class or the only way to do it is by raising the PropertyChanged event in each property.

If not can we write something to auto-generate the piece of code to raise PropertyChanged event?

share|improve this question
    
see stackoverflow.com/questions/1329138/… for a compiler checked way of implementing INotifyPropertyChanged. Avoiding having the property names as a magic string. –  Ian Ringrose Aug 26 '09 at 12:00
4  
code.google.com/p/notifypropertyweaver may be of use –  Ian Ringrose Feb 29 '12 at 11:36
3  
above link is dead. github.com/SimonCropp/NotifyPropertyWeaver –  Codest Oct 18 '12 at 2:40
    
Despite having adequate alternatives, nothing for my team has been as painless as Postsharp's Domain Toolkit (will be bundled with normal Postsharp in upcoming v3.0 I think). [NotifyPropertyChanged] on the class, [NotifyPropertyChangedIgnore] on the props to ignore. –  Adam Caviness Jan 26 '13 at 4:51
2  
You could use DependencyObject and DependencyProperties instead. HA! I made a funny. –  Phil Mar 28 at 19:35

24 Answers 24

up vote 174 down vote accepted

Without using something like postsharp, the minimal version I use uses something like:

public class Data : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    // boiler-plate
    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;
    protected virtual void OnPropertyChanged(string propertyName)
    {
        PropertyChangedEventHandler handler = PropertyChanged;
        if (handler != null) handler(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName));
    }
    protected bool SetField<T>(ref T field, T value, string propertyName)
    {
        if (EqualityComparer<T>.Default.Equals(field, value)) return false;
        field = value;
        OnPropertyChanged(propertyName);
        return true;
    }

    // props
    private string name;
    public string Name
    {
        get { return name; }
        set { SetField(ref name, value, "Name"); }
    }
}

Each property is then just something like:

    private string name;
    public string Name
    {
        get { return name; }
        set { SetField(ref name, value, "Name"); }
    }

which isn't huge; it can also be used as a base-class if you want. The bool return from SetField tells you if it was a no-op, in case you want to apply other logic.


or even easier with C# 5:

protected bool SetField<T>(ref T field, T value,
    [CallerMemberName] string propertyName = null)
{...}

and:

set { SetField(ref name, value); }

with which the compiler will add the "Name" automatically.

share|improve this answer
4  
Nice trick Marc ! I suggested an improvement to use a lambda expression instead of the property name, see my answer –  Thomas Levesque Aug 22 '09 at 17:50
3  
DevXpress Xpo does it this way. –  Anton Tykhyy Aug 22 '09 at 17:54
4  
@Thomas - the lambda is all well and good, but it adds a lot of overhead for something that is actually very simple. A handy trick, but I'm not sure it is always practical. –  Marc Gravell Aug 22 '09 at 19:38
7  
@Marc - Yes, it can probably degrade performance... However I really like the fact that it's checked at compile time, and is correctly refactored by the "Rename" command –  Thomas Levesque Aug 22 '09 at 21:23
4  
@Gusdor fortunately, with C#5 there is no need to compromise - you can get the best of both via (as Pedro77 notes) [CallerMemberName] –  Marc Gravell Oct 22 '13 at 8:30

I really like Marc's solution, but I think it can be slightly improved to avoid using a "magic string" (which doesn't support refactoring). Instead of using the property name as a string, it's easy to make it a lambda expression :

private string name;
public string Name
{
    get { return name; }
    set { SetField(ref name, value, () => Name); }
}

Just add the following methods to Marc's code, it will do the trick :

protected virtual void OnPropertyChanged<T>(Expression<Func<T>> selectorExpression)
{
    if (selectorExpression == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("selectorExpression");
    MemberExpression body = selectorExpression.Body as MemberExpression;
    if (body == null)
        throw new ArgumentException("The body must be a member expression");
    OnPropertyChanged(body.Member.Name);
}

protected bool SetField<T>(ref T field, T value, Expression<Func<T>> selectorExpression)
{
    if (EqualityComparer<T>.Default.Equals(field, value)) return false;
    field = value;
    OnPropertyChanged(selectorExpression);
    return true;
}

BTW, this was inspired by this blog post updated URL

share|improve this answer
    
This is great Thomas. Thanks so much. –  Greg ''Wildman'' Finzer Sep 23 '11 at 13:33
3  
There's at least one framework using this method, ReactiveUI. –  AlSki Oct 11 '11 at 16:19

As of .Net 4.5 there is finally an easy way to do this.

.Net 4.5 introduces a new Caller Information Attributes.

private void OnPropertyChanged<T>([CallerMemberName]string caller = null) {
     // make sure only to call this if the value actually changes

     var handler = PropertyChanged;
     if (handler != null) {
        handler(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(caller));
     }
}

It's probably a good idea to add a comparer to the function as well.

EqualityComparer<T>.Default.Equals

More examples here and here

Also see Caller Information (C# and Visual Basic)

share|improve this answer
2  
Most excellent. This definitely seems to be the way to go moving forward. –  HolySamosa Aug 24 '12 at 16:35
4  
Brilliant! But why is it generic? –  abatishchev Dec 12 '12 at 18:40
    
@abatishchev I guess it doesn't have to be, I was just playing with the idea of having the function set the property as well. I'll see if I can update my answer provide the full solution. The extra examples do a good job that in the meantime. –  Daniel Little Dec 13 '12 at 0:06
2  
It was introduced by C # 5.0. It has nothing to do with .net 4.5, but this is a great solution! –  J. Lennon Feb 17 '13 at 23:20
3  
@J. Lennon .net 4.5 still has something to do with it, after all the attribute comes from somewhere msdn.microsoft.com/en-au/library/… –  Daniel Little Feb 17 '13 at 23:43

I think people should pay a little more attention to performance, it really does impact the UI when there are a lot of objects to be bind (think of a grid with 10,000+ rows) or if the object's value changes frequently (realtime monitoring app).

I took various implementation found here and elsewhere and did a comparison, check it out perfomance comparison of INotifyPropertyChanged implementations.


Here is a peek at the result Implemenation vs Runtime

share|improve this answer
    
+0.5 for performance and +0.5 for the chart. –  codenheim Mar 4 at 1:32
2  
-1 : there is no performance overhead : CallerMemberName are changed into literal values at compile time. Just try and decompile your app. –  JYL Mar 17 at 0:11
    
here is the according question and answer: stackoverflow.com/questions/22580623/… –  uli78 Mar 25 at 13:47
    
@JYL, you are correct that CallerMemberName did not add a large overhead. I must have implemented something wrong last time I tried it. I will update the blog and answer to reflect the benchmark for CallerMemberName and Fody implementation later. –  Peijen Apr 22 at 5:43

There's also Fody which has a PropertyChanged add-in, which lets you write this:

[ImplementPropertyChanged]
public class Person 
{        
    public string GivenNames { get; set; }
    public string FamilyName { get; set; }
}

...and at compile time injects property changed notifications.

share|improve this answer
4  
Excelent TOOL very easy to use it even in partial clases. –  Juan Pablo Gomez Oct 14 '13 at 11:42

I haven't actually had a chance to try this myself yet, but next time I'm setting up a project with a big requirement for INotifyPropertyChanged I'm intending on writing a Postsharp attribute that will inject the code at compile time. Something like:

[NotifiesChange]
public string FirstName { get; set; }

Will become:

private string _firstName;

public string FirstName
{
   get { return _firstname; }
   set
   {
      if (_firstname != value)
      {
          _firstname = value;
          OnPropertyChanged("FirstName")
      }
   }
}

I'm not sure if this will work in practice and I need to sit down and try it out, but I don't see why not. I may need to make it accept some parameters for situations where more than one OnPropertyChanged needs to be triggered (if, for example, I had a FullName property in the class above)

Currently I'm using a custom template in Resharper, but even with that I'm getting fed up of all my properties being so long.


Ah, a quick Google search (which I should have done before I wrote this) shows that at least one person has done something like this before here. Not exactly what I had in mind, but close enough to show that the theory is good.

share|improve this answer
    
A free tool called Fody seems to do the same thing, functioning as a generic compile-time code injector. It's downloadable in Nuget, as are its PropertyChanged and PropertyChanging plugin packages. –  Triynko Feb 10 at 20:39

I introduce a Bindable class in my blog at http://timoch.com/blog/2013/08/annoyed-with-inotifypropertychange/ Bindable uses a dictionary as a property bag. It's easy enough to add the necessary overloads for a subclass to manage its own backing field using ref parameters.

  • No magic string
  • No reflection
  • Can be improved to suppress the default dictionary lookup

The code:

public class Bindable : INotifyPropertyChanged {
    private Dictionary<string, object> _properties = new Dictionary<string, object>();

    /// <summary>
    /// Gets the value of a property
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="T"></typeparam>
    /// <param name="name"></param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    protected T Get<T>([CallerMemberName] string name = null) {
        Debug.Assert(name != null, "name != null");
        object value = null;
        if (_properties.TryGetValue(name, out value))
            return value == null ? default(T) : (T)value;
        return default(T);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Sets the value of a property
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="T"></typeparam>
    /// <param name="value"></param>
    /// <param name="name"></param>
    /// <remarks>Use this overload when implicitly naming the property</remarks>
    protected void Set<T>(T value, [CallerMemberName] string name = null) {
        Debug.Assert(name != null, "name != null");
        if (Equals(value, Get<T>(name)))
            return;
        _properties[name] = value;
        OnPropertyChanged(name);
    }

    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

    protected virtual void OnPropertyChanged([CallerMemberName] string propertyName = null) {
        PropertyChangedEventHandler handler = PropertyChanged;
        if (handler != null) {
            handler(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName));
        }
    }
}

It can be used like this:

public class Contact : Bindable {
    public string FirstName {
        get { return Get<string>(); }
        set { Set(value); }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
The CallerMemberNametrick is amazing! –  Krumelur Aug 25 '13 at 19:24
    
This is the best implementation of all shown here. –  AStackOverflowUser May 7 at 12:08
    
I really like it! I had the same idea with the Dictionary and started programming. I wanted to post this and scrolled down and saw your answer! A little better than mine. Nice! :) –  Felix Keil Sep 17 at 11:45
    
This is a nice solution, but the only downside is that there's a small performance hit involving boxing / unboxing. –  MCattle Oct 17 at 21:57

A very AOP-like approach is to inject the INotifyPropertyChanged stuff onto an already instantiated object on the fly. You can do this with something like Castle DynamicProxy. Here is an article that explains the technique:

Adding INotifyPropertyChanged to an existing object

share|improve this answer

Look here : http://dotnet-forum.de/blogs/thearchitect/archive/2012/11/01/die-optimale-implementierung-des-inotifypropertychanged-interfaces.aspx

It's written in German, but you can download the ViewModelBase.cs. All the comments in the cs-File are written in English.

With this ViewModelBase-Class it is possible to implement bindable properties similar to the well known Dependency Properties :

public string SomeProperty
{
    get { return GetValue( () => SomeProperty ); }
    set { SetValue( () => SomeProperty, value ); }
}
share|improve this answer

Yes, better way certainly exists. Here it is:

Step by step tutorial shrank by me, based on this useful article.

  • Create new project
  • Install castle core package into the project

Install-Package Castle.Core

  • Install mvvm light libraries only

Install-Package MvvmLightLibs

  • Add two classes in project:

NotifierInterceptor

public class NotifierInterceptor : IInterceptor
    {
        private PropertyChangedEventHandler handler;
        public static Dictionary<String, PropertyChangedEventArgs> _cache =
          new Dictionary<string, PropertyChangedEventArgs>();

        public void Intercept(IInvocation invocation)
        {
            switch (invocation.Method.Name)
            {
                case "add_PropertyChanged":
                    handler = (PropertyChangedEventHandler)
                              Delegate.Combine(handler, (Delegate)invocation.Arguments[0]);
                    invocation.ReturnValue = handler;
                    break;
                case "remove_PropertyChanged":
                    handler = (PropertyChangedEventHandler)
                              Delegate.Remove(handler, (Delegate)invocation.Arguments[0]);
                    invocation.ReturnValue = handler;
                    break;
                default:
                    if (invocation.Method.Name.StartsWith("set_"))
                    {
                        invocation.Proceed();
                        if (handler != null)
                        {
                            var arg = retrievePropertyChangedArg(invocation.Method.Name);
                            handler(invocation.Proxy, arg);
                        }
                    }
                    else invocation.Proceed();
                    break;
            }
        }

        private static PropertyChangedEventArgs retrievePropertyChangedArg(String methodName)
        {
            PropertyChangedEventArgs arg = null;
            _cache.TryGetValue(methodName, out arg);
            if (arg == null)
            {
                arg = new PropertyChangedEventArgs(methodName.Substring(4));
                _cache.Add(methodName, arg);
            }
            return arg;
        }
    }

ProxyCreator

public class ProxyCreator
{
    public static T MakeINotifyPropertyChanged<T>() where T : class, new()
    {
        var proxyGen = new ProxyGenerator();
        var proxy = proxyGen.CreateClassProxy(
          typeof(T),
          new[] { typeof(INotifyPropertyChanged) },
          ProxyGenerationOptions.Default,
          new NotifierInterceptor()
          );
        return proxy as T;
    }
}
  • Create your view model, for example:

-

 public class MainViewModel
    {
        public virtual string MainTextBox { get; set; }

        public RelayCommand TestActionCommand
        {
            get { return new RelayCommand(TestAction); }
        }

        public void TestAction()
        {
            Trace.WriteLine(MainTextBox);
        }
    }
  • Put bindings into xaml:

    <TextBox Text="{Binding MainTextBox}" ></TextBox>
    <Button Command="{Binding TestActionCommand}" >Test</Button>
    
  • Put line of code in code-behind file MainWindow.xaml.cs like this:

DataContext = ProxyCreator.MakeINotifyPropertyChanged<MainViewModel>();

  • Enjoy.

enter image description here

Attention!!! All bounded properties should be decorated with keyword virtual because they used by castle proxy for overriding.

share|improve this answer

If you are using dynamics in .NET 4.5 you don't need to worry about INotifyPropertyChanged.

dynamic obj = new ExpandoObject();
obj.Name = "John";

if Name is bound to some control it just works fine.

share|improve this answer

Other things you may want to consider when implementing these sorts of properties is the fact that the INotifyPropertyChang *ed *ing both use event argument classes.

If you have a large number of properties that are being set then the number of event argument class instances can be huge, you should consider caching them as they are one of the areas that a string explosion can occur.

Take a look at this implementation and explanation of why it was conceived.

Josh Smiths Blog

share|improve this answer

Let me introduce my own approach called Yappi. It belongs to Runtime proxy|derived class generators, adding new functionality to an existing object or type, like Caste Project's Dynamic Proxy.

It allows to implement INotifyPropertyChanged once in base class, and then declare derived classes in following style, still supporting INotifyPropertyChanged for new properties:

public class Animal:Concept
{
    protected Animal(){}
    public virtual string Name { get; set; }
    public virtual int Age { get; set; }
}

Complexity of derived class or proxy construction can be hidden behind the following line:

var animal = Concept.Create<Animal>.New();

And all INotifyPropertyChanged implementation work can be done like this:

public class Concept:INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    //Hide constructor
    protected Concept(){}

    public static class Create<TConcept> where TConcept:Concept
    {
        //Construct derived Type calling PropertyProxy.ConstructType
        public static readonly Type Type = PropertyProxy.ConstructType<TConcept, Implementation<TConcept>>(new Type[0], true);
        //Create constructing delegate calling Constructor.Compile
        public static Func<TConcept> New = Constructor.Compile<Func<TConcept>>(Type);
    }


    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

    protected void OnPropertyChanged(PropertyChangedEventArgs eventArgs)
    {
        var caller = PropertyChanged;
        if(caller!=null)
        {
            caller(this, eventArgs);
        }
    }

    //define implementation
    public class Implementation<TConcept> : DefaultImplementation<TConcept> where TConcept:Concept
    {
        public override Func<TBaseType, TResult> OverrideGetter<TBaseType, TDeclaringType, TConstructedType, TResult>(PropertyInfo property)
        {
            return PropertyImplementation<TBaseType, TDeclaringType>.GetGetter<TResult>(property.Name);
        }
        /// <summary>
        /// Overriding property setter implementation.
        /// </summary>
        /// <typeparam name="TBaseType">Base type for implementation. TBaseType must be TConcept, and inherits all its constraints. Also TBaseType is TDeclaringType.</typeparam>
        /// <typeparam name="TDeclaringType">Type, declaring property.</typeparam>
        /// <typeparam name="TConstructedType">Constructed type. TConstructedType is TDeclaringType and TBaseType.</typeparam>
        /// <typeparam name="TResult">Type of property.</typeparam>
        /// <param name="property">PropertyInfo of property.</param>
        /// <returns>Delegate, corresponding to property setter implementation.</returns>
        public override Action<TBaseType, TResult> OverrideSetter<TBaseType, TDeclaringType, TConstructedType, TResult>(PropertyInfo property)
        {
            //This code called once for each declared property on derived type's initialization.
            //EventArgs instance is shared between all events for each concrete property.
            var eventArgs = new PropertyChangedEventArgs(property.Name);
            //get delegates for base calls.
            Action<TBaseType, TResult> setter = PropertyImplementation<TBaseType, TDeclaringType>.GetSetter<TResult>(property.Name);
            Func<TBaseType, TResult> getter = PropertyImplementation<TBaseType, TDeclaringType>.GetGetter<TResult>(property.Name);

            var comparer = EqualityComparer<TResult>.Default;

            return (pthis, value) =>
            {//This code executes each time property setter is called.
                if (comparer.Equals(value, getter(pthis))) return;
                //base. call
                setter(pthis, value);
                //Directly accessing Concept's protected method.
                pthis.OnPropertyChanged(eventArgs);
            };
        }
    }
}

It is fully safe for refactoring, uses no reflection after type construction and fast enough.

share|improve this answer

An idea using reflection:

class ViewModelBase : INotifyPropertyChanged {

    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

    bool Notify<T>(MethodBase mb, ref T oldValue, T newValue) {

        // Get Name of Property
        string name = mb.Name.Substring(4);

        // Detect Change
        bool changed = EqualityComparer<T>.Default.Equals(oldValue, newValue);

        // Return if no change
        if (!changed) return false;

        // Update value
        oldValue = newValue;

        // Raise Event
        if (PropertyChanged != null) {
            PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(name));
        }//if

        // Notify caller of change
        return true;

    }//method

    string name;

    public string Name {
        get { return name; }
        set {
            Notify(MethodInfo.GetCurrentMethod(), ref this.name, value);
        }
    }//method

}//class
share|improve this answer
    
This is pretty cool, I like it more than expression approach. On the downside, should be slower. –  nawfal Aug 12 at 8:11

Another combined solution is using StackFrame:

public class BaseViewModel : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

    protected void Set<T>(ref T field, T value)
    {
        MethodBase method = new StackFrame(1).GetMethod();
        field = value;
        Raise(method.Name.Substring(4));
    }

    protected void Raise(string propertyName)
    {
        var temp = PropertyChanged;
        if (temp != null)
        {
            temp(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName));
        }
    }
}

Usage:

public class TempVM : BaseViewModel
{
    private int _intP;
    public int IntP
    {
        get { return _intP; }
        set { Set<int>(ref _intP, value); }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Based on the answer by Thomas which was adapted from an answer by Marc I've turned the reflecting property changed code into a base class:

public abstract class PropertyChangedBase : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;

    protected void OnPropertyChanged(string propertyName)
    {
        PropertyChangedEventHandler handler = PropertyChanged;
        if (handler != null) 
            handler(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName));
    }

    protected void OnPropertyChanged<T>(Expression<Func<T>> selectorExpression)
    {
        if (selectorExpression == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("selectorExpression");
        var me = selectorExpression.Body as MemberExpression;

        // Nullable properties can be nested inside of a convert function
        if (me == null)
        {
            var ue = selectorExpression.Body as UnaryExpression;
            if (ue != null)
                me = ue.Operand as MemberExpression;
        }

        if (me == null)
            throw new ArgumentException("The body must be a member expression");

        OnPropertyChanged(me.Member.Name);
    }

    protected void SetField<T>(ref T field, T value, Expression<Func<T>> selectorExpression, params Expression<Func<object>>[] additonal)
    {
        if (EqualityComparer<T>.Default.Equals(field, value)) return;
        field = value;
        OnPropertyChanged(selectorExpression);
        foreach (var item in additonal)
            OnPropertyChanged(item);
    }
}

Usage is the same as Thomas' answer except that you can pass additional properties to notify for. This was necessary to handle calculated columns which need to be refreshed in a grid.

private int _quantity;
private int _price;

public int Quantity 
{ 
    get { return _quantity; } 
    set { SetField(ref _quantity, value, () => Quantity, () => Total); } 
}
public int Price 
{ 
    get { return _price; } 
    set { SetField(ref _price, value, () => Price, () => Total); } 
}
public int Total { get { return _price * _quantity; } }

I have this driving a collection of items stored in a BindingList exposed via a DataGridView. It has eliminated the need for me to do manual Refresh() calls to the grid.

share|improve this answer

I have just found ActiveSharp - Automatic INotifyPropertyChanged, I have yet to use it, but it looks good.

To quote from it's web site...


Send property change notifications without specifying property name as a string.

Instead, write properties like this:

public int Foo
{
    get { return _foo; }
    set { SetValue(ref _foo, value); }  // <-- no property name here
}

Note that there is no need to include the name of the property as a string. ActiveSharp reliably and correctly figures that out for itself. It works based on the fact that your property implementation passes the backing field (_foo) by ref. (ActiveSharp uses that "by ref" call to identify which backing field was passed, and from the field it identifies the property).

share|improve this answer

Talk about massive overengineering. This is significantly more complex than just doing it the right way and gives little to no benefit. If your IDE supports code snippets (Visual Studio/MonoDevelop do) then you can make implementing this ridiculously simple. All you'd actually have to type is the type of the property and the property name. The extra three lines of code will be autogenerated.

share|improve this answer
    
In order to stay away from magic strings, you can also use the code from this blog post: blog.m.jedynak.pl/2009/02/static-typed-propety-names.html –  Brett Veenstra Nov 2 '09 at 17:28
5  
Code snippets are nice when you write the code, but can become a pain in maintenance. –  T. Fabre Mar 29 '12 at 12:08
3  
benefit is achieved by having as little code as possible –  jberger Jul 3 '12 at 21:37
    
Code snippets do not solve the problem at all. The issue is magic strings not being renamed when refactoring property names. –  Dan May 12 at 13:54

Another Idea...

 public class ViewModelBase : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    private Dictionary<string, object> _propertyStore = new Dictionary<string, object>();
    protected virtual void SetValue<T>(T value, [CallerMemberName] string propertyName="") {
        _propertyStore[propertyName] = value;
        OnPropertyChanged(propertyName);
    }
    protected virtual T GetValue<T>([CallerMemberName] string propertyName = "")
    {
        object ret;
        if (_propertyStore.TryGetValue(propertyName, out ret))
        {
            return (T)ret;
        }
        else
        {
            return default(T);
        }
    }

    //Usage
    //public string SomeProperty {
    //    get { return GetValue<string>();  }
    //    set { SetValue(value); }
    //}

    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;
    protected void OnPropertyChanged(string propertyName)
    {
        var temp = PropertyChanged;
        if (temp != null)
            temp.Invoke(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName));
    }
}
share|improve this answer

All these answer are very nice.

My solution is using the code snippets to do the job.

This uses the simplest call to PropertyChanged event.

Save this snippet and use it as you use 'fullprop' snippet.

the location can be found at 'Tools\Code Snippet Manager...' menu at Visual Studio.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?>
<CodeSnippets  xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/2005/CodeSnippet">
    <CodeSnippet Format="1.0.0">
        <Header>
            <Title>inotifypropfull</Title>
            <Shortcut>inotifypropfull</Shortcut>
            <HelpUrl>http://ofirzeitoun.wordpress.com/</HelpUrl>
            <Description>Code snippet for property and backing field with notification</Description>
            <Author>Ofir Zeitoun</Author>
            <SnippetTypes>
                <SnippetType>Expansion</SnippetType>
            </SnippetTypes>
        </Header>
        <Snippet>
            <Declarations>
                <Literal>
                    <ID>type</ID>
                    <ToolTip>Property type</ToolTip>
                    <Default>int</Default>
                </Literal>
                <Literal>
                    <ID>property</ID>
                    <ToolTip>Property name</ToolTip>
                    <Default>MyProperty</Default>
                </Literal>
                <Literal>
                    <ID>field</ID>
                    <ToolTip>The variable backing this property</ToolTip>
                    <Default>myVar</Default>
                </Literal>
            </Declarations>
            <Code Language="csharp">
                <![CDATA[private $type$ $field$;

    public $type$ $property$
    {
        get { return $field$;}
        set { 
            $field$ = value;
            var temp = PropertyChanged;
            if (temp != null)
            {
                temp(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs("$property$"));
            }
        }
    }
    $end$]]>
            </Code>
        </Snippet>
    </CodeSnippet>
</CodeSnippets>

You can modify the call as you like (to use the above solutions)

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=> here my solution with the following features

 public ResourceStatus Status
 {
     get { return _status; }
     set
     {
         _status = value;
         Notify(Npcea.Status,Npcea.Comments);
     }
 }
  1. no refelction
  2. short notation
  3. no magic string in your business code
  4. Reusability of PropertyChangedEventArgs across application
  5. Possibility to notify multiple properties in one statement
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I created an Extension Method in my base Library for reuse:

public static class INotifyPropertyChangedExtensions
{
    public static bool SetPropertyAndNotify<T>(this INotifyPropertyChanged sender,
               PropertyChangedEventHandler handler, ref T field, T value, 
               [CallerMemberName] string propertyName = "",
               EqualityComparer<T> equalityComparer = null)
    {
        bool rtn = false;
        var eqComp = equalityComparer ?? EqualityComparer<T>.Default;
        if (!eqComp.Equals(field,value))
        {
            field = value;
            rtn = true;
            if (handler != null)
            {
                var args = new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName);
                handler(sender, args);
            }
        }
        return rtn;
    }
}

This works with .Net 4.5 because of CallerMemberNameAttribute. If you want to use it with an earlier .Net version you have to change the method declaration from: ...,[CallerMemberName] string propertyName = "", ... to ...,string propertyName, ...

Usage:

public class Dog : INotifyPropertyChanged
{
    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;
    string _name;

    public string Name
    {
        get { return _name; }
        set
        {
            this.SetPropertyAndNotify(PropertyChanged, ref _name, value);
        }
    }
}
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Use this

using System;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Reflection;
using System.Reflection.Emit;
using System.Runtime.Remoting.Messaging;
using System.Runtime.Remoting.Proxies;


public static class ObservableFactory
{
    public static T Create<T>(T target)
    {
        if (!typeof(T).IsInterface)
            throw new ArgumentException("Target should be an interface", "target");

        var proxy = new Observable<T>(target);
        return (T)proxy.GetTransparentProxy();
    }
}

internal class Observable<T> : RealProxy, INotifyPropertyChanged, INotifyPropertyChanging
{
    private readonly T target;

    internal Observable(T target)
        : base(ImplementINotify(typeof(T)))
    {
        this.target = target;
    }

    public override IMessage Invoke(IMessage msg)
    {
        var methodCall = msg as IMethodCallMessage;

        if (methodCall != null)
        {
            return HandleMethodCall(methodCall);
        }

        return null;
    }

    public event PropertyChangingEventHandler PropertyChanging;
    public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;



    IMessage HandleMethodCall(IMethodCallMessage methodCall)
    {
        var isPropertySetterCall = methodCall.MethodName.StartsWith("set_");
        var propertyName = isPropertySetterCall ? methodCall.MethodName.Substring(4) : null;

        if (isPropertySetterCall)
        {
            OnPropertyChanging(propertyName);
        }

        try
        {
            object methodCalltarget = target;

            if (methodCall.MethodName == "add_PropertyChanged" || methodCall.MethodName == "remove_PropertyChanged"||
                methodCall.MethodName == "add_PropertyChanging" || methodCall.MethodName == "remove_PropertyChanging")
            {
                methodCalltarget = this;
            }

            var result = methodCall.MethodBase.Invoke(methodCalltarget, methodCall.InArgs);

            if (isPropertySetterCall)
            {
                OnPropertyChanged(methodCall.MethodName.Substring(4));
            }

            return new ReturnMessage(result, null, 0, methodCall.LogicalCallContext, methodCall);
        }
        catch (TargetInvocationException invocationException)
        {
            var exception = invocationException.InnerException;
            return new ReturnMessage(exception, methodCall);
        }
    }

    protected virtual void OnPropertyChanged(string propertyName)
    {
        var handler = PropertyChanged;
        if (handler != null) handler(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName));
    }

    protected virtual void OnPropertyChanging(string propertyName)
    {
        var handler = PropertyChanging;
        if (handler != null) handler(this, new PropertyChangingEventArgs(propertyName));
    }

    public static Type ImplementINotify(Type objectType)
    {
        var tempAssemblyName = new AssemblyName(Guid.NewGuid().ToString());

        var dynamicAssembly = AppDomain.CurrentDomain.DefineDynamicAssembly(
            tempAssemblyName, AssemblyBuilderAccess.RunAndCollect);

        var moduleBuilder = dynamicAssembly.DefineDynamicModule(
            tempAssemblyName.Name,
            tempAssemblyName + ".dll");

        var typeBuilder = moduleBuilder.DefineType(
            objectType.FullName, TypeAttributes.Public | TypeAttributes.Interface | TypeAttributes.Abstract);

        typeBuilder.AddInterfaceImplementation(objectType);
        typeBuilder.AddInterfaceImplementation(typeof(INotifyPropertyChanged));
        typeBuilder.AddInterfaceImplementation(typeof(INotifyPropertyChanging));
        var newType = typeBuilder.CreateType();
        return newType;
    }
}

}

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I resolved in This Way (it's a little bit laboriouse, but it's surely the faster in runtime).

In VB (sorry, but I think it's not hard translate it in C#), I make this substitution with RE:

(?<Attr><(.*ComponentModel\.)Bindable\(True\)>)( |\r\n)*(?<Def>(Public|Private|Friend|Protected) .*Property )(?<Name>[^ ]*) As (?<Type>.*?)[ |\r\n](?![ |\r\n]*Get)

with:

Private _${Name} As ${Type}\r\n${Attr}\r\n${Def}${Name} As ${Type}\r\nGet\r\nReturn _${Name}\r\nEnd Get\r\nSet (Value As ${Type})\r\nIf _${Name} <> Value Then \r\n_${Name} = Value\r\nRaiseEvent PropertyChanged(Me, New ComponentModel.PropertyChangedEventArgs("${Name}"))\r\nEnd If\r\nEnd Set\r\nEnd Property\r\n

This transofrm all code like this:

<Bindable(True)>
Protected Friend Property StartDate As DateTime?

In

Private _StartDate As DateTime?
<Bindable(True)>
Protected Friend Property StartDate As DateTime?
    Get
        Return _StartDate
    End Get
    Set(Value As DateTime?)
        If _StartDate <> Value Then
            _StartDate = Value
            RaiseEvent PropertyChange(Me, New ComponentModel.PropertyChangedEventArgs("StartDate"))
        End If
    End Set
End Property

And If I want to have a more readable code, I can be the opposite just making the following substitution:

Private _(?<Name>.*) As (?<Type>.*)[\r\n ]*(?<Attr><(.*ComponentModel\.)Bindable\(True\)>)[\r\n ]*(?<Def>(Public|Private|Friend|Protected) .*Property )\k<Name> As \k<Type>[\r\n ]*Get[\r\n ]*Return _\k<Name>[\r\n ]*End Get[\r\n ]*Set\(Value As \k<Type>\)[\r\n ]*If _\k<Name> <> Value Then[\r\n ]*_\k<Name> = Value[\r\n ]*RaiseEvent PropertyChanged\(Me, New (.*ComponentModel\.)PropertyChangedEventArgs\("\k<Name>"\)\)[\r\n ]*End If[\r\n ]*End Set[\r\n ]*End Property

With

${Attr} ${Def} ${Name} As ${Type}

I throw to replace the IL code of the set method, but I can't write a lot of compiled code in IL... If a day I write it, I'll say you!

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