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The input is like this:

CNNCC
NCNCN
NNNCC
CCNNN
CCCCN

The output should be like this:

CNNCC
CCCCN

which means, if there're more than 3 occurences of N, that line would be filtered out, otherwise it's kept. (In my work, I need to filter out 100000 lines with more than 500 N so performance might be important)

I know how to filter by consecutive N in awk, but I don't know how to calculate inconsecutive ones..

Does anyone have ideas about this? Solutions in shell is also ok.

Among all the answers, I think this one might be the simpest:

awk -FN 'NF<=3'
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7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted
awk -FN -vcount=3 'NF<=count'

or, for older awk which does not support the -v option,

awk -FN 'NF<=count' count=3

The command uses the target char as the field separator and the maximum allowed occurence as count. By comparing the resulting number of fields against count we can selectively print lines that meet our criteria.

The intention of the statement is not immediately obvious and therefore less readable. It does however has the advantage of having the char and count parametrised and can therefore be easily reused for different settings.

Admittedly, this would not be very efficient for large numbers of count. Setting the maximum number of fields to count+1 would overcome this performance issue, unfortunately the -mf option is ignored by gawk.

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This one work! But only work for gawk It shows /usr/bin/awk: invalid -v option on my MACOS –  hanfeisun Oct 31 '12 at 11:19
1  
@Firegun If you're happy to hardcode the count, try awk -F'N' 'NF<=3{print}' –  Shawn Chin Oct 31 '12 at 11:32
1  
Rather than using -v, you can also do: awk -FN 'NF<=count' count=3. ({print} is redundant.) –  William Pursell Oct 31 '12 at 12:44
1  
If your awk doesn't support -v then get a new awk as that option is supported by all modern awks, not just GNU awk, and any awk that doesn't support that will be missing other functionality too. Also, -v is usually the right way to set variables as that sets them for the BEGIN section too, whereas using var=val in the arg list only sets them after BEGIN. Nice solution +1! –  Ed Morton Oct 31 '12 at 14:02
2  
great, but I suggest you don't name the command "gawk" as that makes it sound like it's gawk-specific when it isn't: -v will work with all modern awks including gawk, nawk, tawk, /usr/xpg4/bin/awk, etc. –  Ed Morton Oct 31 '12 at 14:27

This might work for you (GNU sed):

sed -r '/(.*N){3}/d' file

or

sed 's/N/&/3;T;d' file
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Nice :) ....... –  Shawn Chin Oct 31 '12 at 14:24
    
+1. Very nice...... –  Guru Oct 31 '12 at 15:06

A sed solution using the same regular expression:

% sed '/N.*N.*N/d'

d deletes every line that anywhere has three or more N characters.

Example:

% sed '/N.*N.*N/d' <<EOF
`heredoc> CNNCC
`heredoc> NCNCN
`heredoc> NNNCC
`heredoc> CCNNN
`heredoc> CCCCN
`heredoc> EOF
CNNCC
CCCCN
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You can use gsub to count:

awk 'gsub(/N/,"N") < 3' file.txt

Results:

CNNCC
CCCCN
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But this would gsub every N. Isn't it enough to stop matching after the third N? –  user647772 Oct 31 '12 at 11:17

No love for grep?

count=3
egrep -v "(.*N){$count}" file

More info:

-v inverts match, so this find lines that does not contain 3 N's (if the line has more than 3 N's, it contains 3 N's).

egrep is equivalent to grep -E which uses extended regexp (ERE), used here so that ( ) and { } don't have to be escaped.

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Perl one-liner

perl -ne 'print if tr/N/N/ < 3'
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This will do it:

gawk '/N.*N.*N/ { next; } { print; }'
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Thanks! but I need to filter out 100000 lines with more than 500 N.... –  hanfeisun Oct 31 '12 at 11:00
    
@Firegun The number of lines is not relevant. The regular expression implementation of gawk should be efficient enough to match even lines with 500+ characters. –  user647772 Oct 31 '12 at 11:09

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