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Question

Does anyone know why there is no GROUP BY optimization for MyISAM-based tables? (I'm using this version: 5.1.49-3)

Test tables

CREATE TABLE `_test2_innodb` (
    `i` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
    `n` smallint(5) unsigned NOT NULL,
    `t` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL,
    `v` smallint(6) NOT NULL,
    PRIMARY KEY (`i`),
    KEY `i_n` (`n`),
    KEY `i_t` (`t`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1

CREATE TABLE `_test2_myisam` (
    `i` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
    `n` smallint(5) unsigned NOT NULL,
    `t` int(10) unsigned NOT NULL,
    `v` smallint(6) NOT NULL,
    PRIMARY KEY (`i`),
    KEY `i_n` (`n`),
    KEY `i_t` (`t`)
) ENGINE=MyISAM DEFAULT CHARSET=latin1

Test queries

SELECT MAX(i) FROM _test2_myisam GROUP BY n;

SELECT MAX(i) FROM _test2_innodb GROUP BY n;

Results

id, select_type, table, type, poss_keys, key, key_len, ref, rows, extra

1, SIMPLE, _test2_myisam , ALL, , , , , 19998, Using temporary; Using filesort

1, SIMPLE, _test2_innodb, index, , i_n, 2, , 20024, Using index

The problem is that if I'm using MyISAM, a full table scan will be done, which takes hours on large tables... And the MySQL documentation doesn't mention anything about table engines having different implementations ( http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/group-by-optimization.html ). Does anyone know why is this handled differently internally?

(Note: no, it is not a good solution to switch to InnoDB) Thanks

share|improve this question
    
The 2 test tables have identical definitions, except for the table engine used. The data in the 2 tables was also identical when I ran the tests. Is there something else I should be looking at? –  Kristof Kotai Oct 31 '12 at 11:27
    
At this day and year, there is virtually NO reason to use MyISAM. Engines internally have their own data structures and can do extra work so that MySQL core doesn't have to. As for why MyISAM doesn't have something or does have - you'll have to ask the creators of the code or consult with the source code. –  N.B. Oct 31 '12 at 11:49
    
"At this day and year, there is virtually NO reason to use MyISAM" There are many advantages to MyISAM, that InnoDB doesn't offer. For example we build mobile apps that use/rely heavily on geospatial data. Geospatial indexes on tables for example are non-existent in InnoDB. Whereas our services/code utilises that all the time and therefore has a huge performance gain because of that... –  Kristof Kotai Oct 31 '12 at 11:55
    
@Kristof: You are right, it's one of the 2 limitations of InnoDB: Spatial and full-text search. –  ypercube Oct 31 '12 at 12:01
    
Fulltext exists but yes, the geospatial indexes don't. I won't go into how you could achieve similar functionality, but the fact remains that InnoDB is much better in using memory and I/O and does a lot of work so MySQL core doesn't have to. Personally, I've never used geospatial indexing or worked with geospatial data so my knowledge is nonexistent in that field therefore I'm not credible for suggesting workarounds. –  N.B. Oct 31 '12 at 12:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The difference between the two tables, despite the seemingly identical definitions, is that MyISAM tables are "heaps" while InnoDB tables are clustered organized tables, e.g. the clustered index is the table (usually the primary key, the (i) index here).

The other difference, that causes the different execution plans is that in InnoDB, all non-clustered indexes (your (n) index in this case), include also the columns of the clustered index, the (i) in this case, so no full table scan is needed.

In other words, the (n) InnoDB index is roughly equivalent to a (n, PK) MyISAM index.

The MyISAM engine has to either do a full table scan or an index scan of the (n) index and then also scan the table (to get the values of the i column). So, it chooses the first plan (full scan + filesort to find the MAX values).


Do the test again, after adding an index on (n, i) in the MyISAM table:

ALTER TABLE _test2_myisam
    ADD INDEX n_i (n, i) ;
share|improve this answer
    
Basically, the (n) InnoDB index is roughly equivalent to a (n, PK) MyISAM index. Is that more clear? –  ypercube Oct 31 '12 at 11:57
    
Yes, that's it. Basically we are simulating InnoDB's behaviour on MyISAM tables explicitly. Thanks :) –  Kristof Kotai Oct 31 '12 at 12:10

This is because InnoDB are stored in an index-organized way, based on the primary key. So the table scan and the primary key scan will be the same exact thing. Unfortunately for MyISAM, this is not the case, it will have to do a filesort.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, but this has nothing to do with the primary key. This GROUP BY query is needed to be optimised on a secondary index. That's why the result for the InnoDB query shows "i_n" for the "key" column. Maybe the test query confused you. If I used "MAX(t)" in the SELECTs, I would get the same results. –  Kristof Kotai Oct 31 '12 at 11:46
    
yes, it can use the other indexes as well - MyISAM cannot. –  Michael Oct 31 '12 at 11:52

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