Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This code ran for 0.012 seconds:

 std::list<int> list;
 list.resize(100);
 int size;
 for(int i = 0 ; i < 10000; i++)
     size = list.size();

This one for 9.378 seconds:

 std::list<int> list;
 list.resize(100000);
 int size;
 for(int i = 0 ; i < 10000; i++)
     size = list.size();

In my opinion it would be possible to implement std::list in such way, that size would be stored in a private variable but according to this it is computed again each time I call size. Can anyone explain why?

share|improve this question
    
You don't need list::size, it is not a random-access container. The only way to count the number of elements is to iterate the whole list. Private variable would increase the memory overhead, which is still an issue - if not for you personally, then for many other people. –  Viktor Latypov Oct 31 '12 at 11:47
3  
Did you actually isolate the list.size() loop in your measurement? Or is the line list.resize(...) also included in it, as a strict reading of your question suggests? –  Daniel Daranas Oct 31 '12 at 11:49
    
Sorry if I didn't make it clear. Only list.size() is inside the loop. –  pali6 Oct 31 '12 at 11:53
1  
What are you measuring exactly? The entire program, or the loop? A good compiler would remove the 'loop' part of your code since it's just doing the same operation over and over. –  PhonicUK Oct 31 '12 at 12:02
1  
@ViktorLatypov Let me see if I understand you correctly... you are asserting that people who would take exception at an additional 4 (or 8 or, hell, even 16 bytes) per std::list would actually use std::list to begin with? Are you serious? I mean really? –  Nik Bougalis Oct 31 '12 at 16:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 16 down vote accepted

There is a conflict between constant time size() and constant time list.splice. The committee chose to favour splice.

When you splice nodes between two lists, you would have to count the nodes moved to update the sizes of the two lists. That takes away a lot of the advantage of splicing nodes by just changing a few internal pointers.


As noted in the comments, C++11 has changed this by giving up O(1) for some rare(?) uses of splice:

void splice(const_iterator position, list& x, const_iterator first, const_iterator last);
void splice(const_iterator position, list&& x, const_iterator first, const_iterator last);

Complexity: Constant time if &x == this; otherwise, linear time.

share|improve this answer
3  
Couldn't size be cached? –  6502 Oct 31 '12 at 11:51
4  
commitee actually said that it's up to implementation. It's GNU that chose to implement it as O(n). In MS STL it's O(1). In C++11 it guaranteed to be O(1) –  user1773602 Oct 31 '12 at 11:53
    
Size can be cached, but that is not very useful is you don't know when that happens. Otherwise you get "sometimes O(1), sometimes O(n)". Not very helpful. –  Bo Persson Oct 31 '12 at 11:54
1  
What aleguna says. C++03 doesn't choose (it says that size() "should" be O(1) but not "must"). C++11 chooses to favour size(), and this brings list in line with all other standard containers, which have obvious ways to implement O(1) size(). In both C++03 and C++11, splice is only required to have constant complexity in the cases where sizes (if cached) could be updated without counting nodes. –  Steve Jessop Oct 31 '12 at 12:04
2  
@john: well, I disagree, I'd rather have list demoted from being a container and have O(N) size and O(1) splice. If you do not use splice, there is little point using a list in the first place. –  Matthieu M. Oct 31 '12 at 14:42

In ISO/IEC 14882:2011, §C.2.12, Clause 23: "containers library":

Change: Complexity of size() member functions now constant

Rationale: Lack of specification of complexity of size() resulted in divergent implementations with inconsistent performance characteristics.

Effect on original feature: Some container implementations that conform to C++ 2003 may not conform to the specified size() requirements in this International Standard. Adjusting containers such as std::list to the stricter requirements may require incompatible changes.


For the comments:

In 23.3.5.5 - "list operations", again in ISO/IEC 14882:2011:

list provides three splice operations that destructively move elements from one list to another. The behavior of splice operations is undefined if get_allocator() != x.get_allocator().

void splice(const_iterator position, list& x);
void splice(const_iterator position, list&& x);
Requires: &x != this.
Effects: Inserts the contents of x before position and x becomes empty. Pointers and references to the moved elements of x now refer to those same elements but as members of *this. Iterators referringto the moved elements will continue to refer to their elements, but they now behave as iterators into *this, not into x.
Complexity: Constant time.

void splice(const_iterator position, list& x, const_iterator i);
void splice(const_iterator position, list&& x, const_iterator i);
Effects: Inserts an element pointed to by i from list x before position and removes the element from x. The result is unchanged if position == i or position == ++i. Pointers and references to *i continue to refer to this same element but as a member of *this. Iterators to *i (including i itself) continue to refer to the same element, but now behave as iterators into *this, not into x.
Requires: i is a valid dereferenceable iterator of x.
Complexity: Constant time.

void splice(const_iterator position, list& x, const_iterator first, const_iterator last);
void splice(const_iterator position, list&& x, const_iterator first, const_iterator last);
Effects: Inserts elements in the range [first,last) before position and removes the elements from x. Requires: [first, last) is a valid range in x. The result is undefined if position is an iterator in the range [first,last). Pointers and references to the moved elements of x now refer to those same elements but as members of *this. Iterators referring to the moved elements will continue to refer to their elements, but they now behave as iterators into *this, not into x.
Complexity: Constant time if &x == this; otherwise, linear time.

share|improve this answer
1  
Does that mean that splice is now O(N) or did they find a way to avoid that? –  jcoder Oct 31 '12 at 11:59
1  
@J99: In C++11, the version of splice that takes 4 arguments is now O(N), except in the case where the source and destination lists are the same. The other two forms, and moving elements within the same list (which is the other case for the 4 argument version) are all O(1). –  Dave S Oct 31 '12 at 12:07
    
@J99 - see my edit. –  Kiril Kirov Oct 31 '12 at 12:10
    
And what Dave says, was also the case in C++03. –  Steve Jessop Oct 31 '12 at 12:10

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.