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I'm trying to find the indices of all the local minima and maxima within an Array.

Example:

int[] array = {5,4,3,3,3,3,3,2,2,2,  6,6,8,5,5,5,3,3,2,1,  1,4,4,7};
//                             |         |                 |
// Indices:    0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9, 10,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9, 20,1,2,3
// Minima: 8, 20
// Maxima: 12

I came up with an algorithm about which I have few questions:

  • Is there a much better one? :)
  • I used an Enum with methods to achieve this dualism that UP and STRAIGHT_UP are both "UP". Seems messy to me. Any suggestions?
  • Do you have better method-names? direction() (+return value) kind of implies that STRAIGHT is not a dir. But at the same time it is, since its an element in the Emum. Hm.
  • It works for the given array. Do you see a situation where it does not?

-

import java.util.ArrayList;


public class MinMaxFinder {
    private int[] array;
    private ArrayList<Integer> minima;
    private ArrayList<Integer> maxima;


    private enum Direction{
        UP, DOWN, STRAIGHT_UP, STRAIGHT_DOWN, STRAIGHT;

        public Direction direction(){
            if(this==UP || this==STRAIGHT_UP){
                return UP;
            }else if(this==DOWN || this==STRAIGHT_DOWN){
                return DOWN;
            }else{
                return STRAIGHT;
            }
        }

        public boolean isStraight(){
            if(this==STRAIGHT_DOWN || this==STRAIGHT_UP || this==STRAIGHT){
                return true;
            }else{
                return false;
            }
        }

        public boolean hasDifferentDirection(Direction other){
            if(this!=STRAIGHT && other!=STRAIGHT && this.direction() != other.direction() ){
                return true;
            }
            return false;
        }
    }

    public MinMaxFinder(int[] array){
        this.array = array;
    }

    public void update() {
        minima = new ArrayList<Integer>();
        maxima = new ArrayList<Integer>();

        Direction segmentDir = Direction.DOWN;
        int indexOfDirectionChange = 0;
        int prevVal = array[0];
        int arrayLength = array.length; 
        for(int i=1; i<arrayLength; i++){
            int currVal = array[i];
            Direction currentDir = currVal<prevVal?Direction.DOWN:(currVal>prevVal?Direction.UP:Direction.STRAIGHT);
            prevVal = currVal;

            if(currentDir.hasDifferentDirection(segmentDir)){
                int changePos = (indexOfDirectionChange+i-1)/2;
                if(currentDir.direction() == Direction.DOWN){
                    maxima.add(changePos);
                }else{
                    minima.add(changePos);
                }

                segmentDir = currentDir;
                indexOfDirectionChange = i;
            }else if( currentDir.isStraight() ^ segmentDir.isStraight() ){
                indexOfDirectionChange = i;

                if(currentDir.isStraight() && segmentDir.direction()==Direction.UP){
                    segmentDir=Direction.STRAIGHT_UP;
                }else if(currentDir.isStraight() && segmentDir.direction()==Direction.DOWN){
                    segmentDir=Direction.STRAIGHT_DOWN;
                }else{
                    segmentDir = currentDir;
                }
            }
        }
    }

    public ArrayList<Integer> getMinima() {
        return minima;
    }

    public ArrayList<Integer> getMaxima() {
        return maxima;
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
Why is index 0 (the number 5) not a local maximum? Same for index 23. Can the first/last numbers never be a maximum/minimum? –  DaDaDom Oct 31 '12 at 12:09
1  
Does it matter, in case of repetition of values, which of the indexes you select?? E.g.: a={5,6,6,6}, must 'max' be 2 or it is ok for it 1,2 or 3?? –  mdm Oct 31 '12 at 12:12
    
Also, I agree with @DaDaDom: 7 (index 23) should be a maximum –  mdm Oct 31 '12 at 12:15
    
I think index=2 (middle 6) comes closest to the "real/analogue" minimum. –  Phil Oct 31 '12 at 12:53

3 Answers 3

Consider an array of first differences d[i] = a[i] - a[i-1].

If d[i] is positive, then a increased over the last step and if d[i] is negative then a decreased. So, a change in sign of d from positive to negative indicates a was increasing, now decreasing, a local max. Similarly, negative to positive indicates a local min.

share|improve this answer
    
This only gives the local min/max in regard to its direct neighbors. Furthermore one would have to iterate over two arrays. –  Phil Oct 31 '12 at 13:10
1  
Your question asked for local min/max. How do you define local min/max? Note I was sketching an idea for you. It would be unnecessary to actually store an array of first differences, you simply need to calculate them as you traverse your input array and track changes in sign. –  A. Webb Oct 31 '12 at 13:25
    
Yes, i appreciate your suggestion! :) The problem is that the values are discret. 1222221 -> Max at index 3. Although the two neighbors are both 2 (in differences array it would be 0). Thats why I have this differentiation between STRAIGHT_UP and STRAIGHT_DOWN. d[i] = a[i] - a[i-1] is Direction currentDir = currVal<prevVal?Direction.DOWN:(currVal>prevVal?Direction.UP:Direction.STRAIGHT)‌​; –  Phil Oct 31 '12 at 13:39
    
So, the issue is you want the middle index of a range of equal values? Record the index where d[i] changes sign and then count the number n where subsequent d are zero. You want index i + n/2. –  A. Webb Oct 31 '12 at 13:46
    
Right. I have to look at the sign to the right-hand side of the zeros too. Since it can be something like this {1,2,2,2,3,3,3,2,2,2}; So there is change from 1to2 and then again from 2to3 but both are going up. So the sequence of twos are not of interest anymore. But ur getting me on a good way :) Im trying it with a nested loop. –  Phil Oct 31 '12 at 14:00
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think i got it. Thanks guys! Your ideas helped me a lot!

The following solution will do for me:

    ArrayList<Integer> mins = new ArrayList<Integer>();
    ArrayList<Integer> maxs = new ArrayList<Integer>();

    int prevDiff = array[0] - array[1];
    int i=1;
    while(i<array.length-1){    
        int currDiff = 0;
        int zeroCount = 0;
        while(currDiff == 0 && i<array.length-1){
            zeroCount++;
            i++;
            currDiff = array[i-1] - array[i];
        }

        int signCurrDiff = Integer.signum(currDiff);
        int signPrevDiff = Integer.signum(prevDiff);
        if( signPrevDiff != signCurrDiff && signCurrDiff != 0){ //signSubDiff==0, the case when prev while ended bcoz of last elem
            int index = i-1-(zeroCount)/2;
            if(signPrevDiff == 1){
                mins.add( index );
            }else{
                maxs.add( index );
            }               
        }
        prevDiff = currDiff;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
If you are happy with your answer, then you should accept your answer as the answer! –  A. Webb Oct 31 '12 at 18:01

Something like this "should" work and it's probably conceptually less complicated. Scans the array once and registers mins and maxs.

Things worth mentioning:
1) The if(direction < 0){}else{} can probably be removed, but I didn't have time to think about the details.
2) The key idea is, depending on the first "direction" (whether we see a min or a max first), the for loops order changes.
3) in case of multiple items, it will always keep the last element (highest index).

if(a.length < 2){
       return;
   }

   List<Integer> mins = new ArrayList<Integer>();
   List<Integer> maxs = new ArrayList<Integer>();
   int i=1;
   int prev = 0;

   int direction = 0;
   for(int j=1, k = 0;j<a.length && (direction = a[j]-a[k]) == 0;j++, k++);

   if(direction == 0){
       //Array contains only same value.
       return;
   }

   if(direction < 0){
       while(i<a.length){
           for(;i<a.length && a[prev] >= a[i];i++,prev++);
           mins.add(prev);
           for(;i<a.length && a[prev] <= a[i];i++,prev++);
           maxs.add(prev);
           i++;prev++;
       }    
   }
   else{
       while(i<a.length){
           for(;i<a.length && a[prev] <= a[i];i++,prev++);
           maxs.add(prev);
           for(;i<a.length && a[prev] >= a[i];i++,prev++);
           mins.add(prev);
           i++;prev++;
       }
   }

   //maxs and mins now contain what requested
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! This works fine. Although point 3) is important to me. –  Phil Oct 31 '12 at 16:05
    
Yeah, I didn't read the follow-up to my comment on your question. However it is fairly easy, using this approach, to work out the "median" index. –  mdm Oct 31 '12 at 16:11

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