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I am having some confusion between static final class variable and final instance variable.

Here is the sample code:-

class Foof{
final int size=3;
final int whuffie;

Foof()
{
whuffie=42; 
}

public static void main(String [] args){
Foof obj1 = new Foof();
Foof obj2 = new Foof();

obj1.size=53;    //compile time error
System.out.println(obj1.size);
obj2.whuffie=45; //compile time error
System.out.println(obj2.whuffie);
}
}

Error:-

ankit@stream:/home/Data/JAVA/practice/src/test.com/test-20121031_static_demystified$ javac Foof.java 
Foof.java:14: error: cannot assign a value to final variable size
obj1.size=53;    //compile time error
    ^
Foof.java:16: error: cannot assign a value to final variable whuffie
obj2.whuffie=45;
    ^
2 errors

So my question is, what is the point of having final instance variables if they can't have a different values per different instance. I mean if they have same value for each instance then why don't we declare them as class variable(static final class variable) as this would serve the same purpose and the we don't need to create objects in order to access them.


EDIT -1:-

class Foof{
final int size=3;
final int whuffie;

Foof()
{
whuffie=42;
size = 23;  //compile-time error.
}

public static void main(String [] args){
Foof obj1 = new Foof();
Foof obj2 = new Foof();

//obj1.size=53;    
System.out.println(obj1.size);
//obj2.whuffie=45; 
System.out.println(obj2.whuffie);
}
}

Error:-

Foof.java:8: cannot assign a value to final variable size
size = 23;
^
1 error

According to the error, i can make out that first size is assigned a value =3 during object creation.

share|improve this question
1  
Your comments claim three compile-time errors. There are only two. –  Jon Skeet Oct 31 '12 at 12:07
    
@Jon, i was assuming that the constructor-code would also generate an error; but it didn't. –  Ankit Oct 31 '12 at 12:09
1  
what is the point of having final instance variables if they can't have a different values per different instance They can. You can set it in the constructor of said object, either by obtaining it from some logic, or receiving it as a parameter... This is exactly the same Jon Skeet referred: the constructor setting will not give a compile error. –  ppeterka Oct 31 '12 at 12:09
2  
@Ankit: Why would you not test the assumption before posting the question? Always do research before you ask questions, not afterwards... –  Jon Skeet Oct 31 '12 at 12:10
    
@Jon, i will take care in future. Edited my question to show only 2 compile time errors. –  Ankit Oct 31 '12 at 12:14

6 Answers 6

So my question is, what is the point of having final instance variables if they can't have a different values per different instance.

They can, but those values can't be changed after creation. You can only assign values to final instance fields within instance variable initializers and constructors, and you must assign values to all instance fields that way.

Note that in your code here:

Foof()
{
    whuffie=42;  //compile time error
}

... the comment is incorrect. That assignment should be perfectly valid.

Final fields are useful for implementing immutability - which helps make it easy to reason about an object. For example, String is immutable, so if you validate a string and then keep a copy of the reference, you know that validation will still be correct later on.

Compare that with java.util.Date, where if you really want to have any faith in validation being useful, you need to create a defensive copy of the Date value and not provide the reference to any other code, in case it changes the underlying instant being represented.

share|improve this answer
    
i tried to change the value of the size (currently 3) to 23 in the constructor but still getting the error. –  Ankit Oct 31 '12 at 16:29
1  
@Ankit: Then you need to remove the initializer expression. Basically, you can only set a final variable once. –  Jon Skeet Oct 31 '12 at 17:05

A final is final as soon as you asign a value to it. You can't change it later.

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You can't modify a final variable after initializing on declaration or in the constructor(s).

Using the static keyword doesn't make it modifiable. It just means the final variable can be accessed through the class name or instance variable, the variable is still immutable.

share|improve this answer
    
got the point; but wouldn't it be good to make the variable static because my code wouldn't have to deal with object creation(saving memory.) –  Ankit Oct 31 '12 at 17:07
1  
Ha ha, not a good reason really :) If you want more memory then buy it, not as expensive as before :P And it could be a pain to maintain later. So unless it makes sense to expose your code then it is fine. Making it a final variable makes it slightly OK. –  Lews Therin Oct 31 '12 at 17:12

Actually static and non static final variable are needs when we are creating any varible as a class specific then will declare it as static and if object level then will declare it as non static variable.

For example, We have a country as a class and and will have two data members of that class like timezone and gravity. we declred both of them as final, but timezone is object specific(timezone of every country is different but same throughout the country) and gravity is class specific(gravity of each country is same as earths gravity) so we are declared gravity as static final.

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final variables are typically used to define things that should never change. You can write to it one time and then it is set forever.

You might use this in a constructor to set an ID for an object or something similar.

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For final variables you can assign value only once. It is generally used in case where you don't want the values of variables to be changed later in your program.

Static variables only one instance is created per class, irrespective of number of objects of that class you create.

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