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I have defined a struct in side a class. One of the members is an array with a given size.

class foo {
private:
  int N;
  struct entry {
    uint64_t pc;
    uint64_t offset;
    bool pattern [N];
  };
public:
  void bar()
  {
   entry en;
   en.pc = 1;
   en.offset = 2;
   en.pattern[en.pc] = 1;
  }
};

But the error is

error: invalid use of non-static data member ‘N’
share|improve this question
1  
That's no a fixed-size array at all. – Fred Foo Oct 31 '12 at 12:48
up vote 3 down vote accepted

C++ doesn't support variable-length arrays. N must be known at compile-time. An alternative is using a std::vector instead.

class foo {
private:
  int N;
  struct entry {
    uint64_t pc;
    uint64_t offset;
    std::vector<int> pattern;
  };
public:
  void bar()
  {
   N = 100; //don't forget to initialize N
   entry en;
   en.pc = 1;
   en.offset = 2;
   en.pattern.resize(N);
   en.pattern[en.pc] = 1;
  }
};
share|improve this answer
    
that pattern is a bit vector. let say 00000. Then I want to set one of them using en.pc to . So 01000. Using vector, I have to push_back – mahmood Oct 31 '12 at 12:48
    
@mahmood you don't have to push_back using a vector. Also, you can use a std::bitset<N> instead. – Luchian Grigore Oct 31 '12 at 12:49
    
Still using std::bitset I have to define a static const int N=5; – mahmood Oct 31 '12 at 12:56
    
@mahmood yes, that's true. Then std::vector. You can create a vector with N entries and then use operator[] just as if it was an array. No push_back, no re-allocation. – Luchian Grigore Oct 31 '12 at 12:57

N size have to be known at compile time. If you make in like static const int N=5 it will compile.

share|improve this answer
    
did you try compiling that? – Luchian Grigore Oct 31 '12 at 12:48
    
yes it works. But it seems that bitset is better. – mahmood Oct 31 '12 at 12:52
    
Ah, with static it works (it wasn't there before). – Luchian Grigore Oct 31 '12 at 12:52
    
I corrected this for use in class. I typically use fixed size arrays on stack to perform some on side operations. I have never used it as class member. – pro_metedor Oct 31 '12 at 12:54

To initialize an array, you must use a compile-time known integral constant. If you'd said static const int N=10;, say it would have worked.

Variable-length arrays, i.e. where the size is not known until runtime, are not allowed in C++.

One other way of doing this could be to use a template, e.g.:

template<int N>
struct my_struct {
    bool vals[N];
};

Or, similarly, use std::array, as in std::array<bool,10> vals;.

share|improve this answer

Better to use a std::vector than a fixed length array in most cases. In this case you don't know the size at compile time which isn't allowed anyway. Given that it's a collection of bool, you might want to consider a std::bitset which is a lot more size efficient than an array of bool

template < int S >
class foo {
private:
  int N;
  struct entry {
    uint64_t pc;
    uint64_t offset;
    std::bitset<S> pattern;
  };
public:
  entry en;
  foo()
  {
    en.pc = 1;
    en.offset = 2;
    en.pattern[en.pc] = 1;
  }
};

Note that I've added the foo constructor, which may or may not now make sense given the switch to a bitset, and the object can now be used as follows:

foo<24> myBits;
share|improve this answer

Here the N is not known at the compile time. if you create a ob1,ob2,ob3 then there is a possiblity that all the three object might have different value of N and which is against law of c++( variable-length arrays).

either use const int N=5; or make a N as class variable static int foo::N=6;

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