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What is “->” after function declaration?

I've just come across the following examples of C++ functions using the new auto keyword, and I was hoping someone could help me understand what the syntax means.

template <class T, class U>
auto add(T t, U u) -> decltype(t + u);

auto f = [](int a, int b) -> int {
   return a*b;
};

Specifically, I'm confused about the user of -> in the function signature and I would expect these to be written in the as

template <class T, class U>
auto add(T t, U u)
{
    decltype(t + u);
}

auto f = [](int a, int b){
    return a*b;
};

What's the -> operator doing in there, and where can I learn more about this syntax?

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marked as duplicate by Jesse Good, jogojapan, stealthyninja, xxbbcc, Starx Nov 5 '12 at 6:44

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

6 Answers

up vote 13 down vote accepted

What's the -> operator doing in there?

That's a trailing return type. Instead of:

int f();

you can equivalently write:

auto f() -> int;

If the return type depends on the function parameter types, then you need to use this form; the parameters aren't available until after they've been declared:

decltype(t+u) add(T t, U u); // Error: uses `t` and `u` before they're declared
auto add(T t, U u) -> decltype(t + u); // OK

Also, if you want to specify the return type of a lambda, then you must use this form; although, as you point out, in many cases (including this one) you don't need to specify that at all.

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[dcl.spec.auto]/2 explains how to write function declaration with auto return type :

The auto type-specifier may appear with a function declarator with a trailing-return-type (8.3.5) in any context where such a declarator is valid.

And then later, in [dcl.fct]/12, there is a note :

Typedefs and trailing-return-types are sometimes convenient when the return type of a function is complex. For example, the function fpif above could have been declared

typedef int IFUNC(int);
IFUNC* fpif(int);

or

auto fpif(int)->int(*)(int)

A trailing-return-type is most useful for a type that would be more complicated to specify before the declarator-id:

template <class T, class U> auto add(T t, U u) -> decltype(t + u);

rather than

template <class T, class U> decltype((*(T*)0) + (*(U*)0)) add(T t, U u);
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This syntax (so called trailing-return-type) is a workaround for using expression as return type, as the following:

template <class T, class U>
   decltype(t + u) add(T t, U u) { ... }

... would not be correct in C++.

Have to say this issue is explained well enough (I suppose) in Wiki.

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1  
... it is not correct because it uses t and u before they are in scope (they're only declared in the parameter list). –  R. Martinho Fernandes Oct 31 '12 at 12:55
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-> is a trailing return type.

C++11 proposed an alternative function declaration syntax. auto keyword takes a place of the usual function return type, and the actual return type goes after ->.

For example,

auto f (int a, int b) -> int;

is equivalent to

int f(int a, int b);

This feature is most useful for template functions where the return type has to be deduced from the template parameters.

For example,

template <class T, class U>
auto add(T t, U u) -> decltype(t + u);

the return type would be the type of the expression (t+u).

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What's the -> operator doing in there, and where can I learn more about this syntax?

There's a very nice explaination about this on cprogramming.

The essence of using -> (in your case) or auto, decltype is convenience and letting you focus more on the programming logic.

The trailing return type (->) helps you include the return type information in the function declaration itself.

In case of your alternate example:

auto add(T t, U u)
{
    decltype(t + u);
}

If the function is fairly complex, then it would be pretty difficult (not obviously obvious) for a reader of your program to figure out what the expected return type is.

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The -> operator in function declarations specifies the return type for functions returning "auto". It's defined in chapter 8 of the C++11 standard.

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