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I am trying to create multiple JLabels of the same form and then trying to add them to the same JPanel. However, only one of the JLabels appears and I can't figure out why! Here is the code that I have written:

    final JPanel labelPanel = new JPanel(new BorderLayout());
    panel.add(labelPanel, BorderLayout.NORTH);

    JLabel[] dashedLineLabel = new JLabel[wordLength];

    for (int i = 0; i < wordLength; i++)
    {   
        dashedLineLabel[i] = new JLabel("__  ");
        dashedLineLabel[i].setFont(new Font("Serif", Font.BOLD, 30));
        labelPanel.add(dashedLineLabel[i]);
    }   

Any help would be greatly appreciated! Thank you

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You aren't using the BorderLayout properly. The labels are all added at the center location of the layout, and thus overwrite each others. Try a FlowLayout instead, or even better, a MigLayout.

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+1 For that MigLayout! :) –  Branislav Lazic Oct 31 '12 at 13:41
    
+1, MigLayout is the best. ;) –  brimborium Oct 31 '12 at 13:53

You can not use BorderLayout for that, because that layout has only room for 5 components: BorderLayout.CENTER, BorderLayout.NORTH, BorderLayout.WEST, BorderLayout.SOUTH, BorderLayout.EAST.

Solution with one of the built in layouts:

I would suggest using a FlowLayout or a GridLayout, depending on what you want. You can still use BorderLayout as outer panel, but just introduce an inner panel with one of the above mentioned layouts.

So with a GridLayout, you would wrap your labels in a grid layout and then put this one in your border layout. Your code would look like this:

panel.setLayout(new BorderLayout());
final JPanel upperPanel = new JPanel(); 
panel.add(upperPanel, BorderLayout.NORTH); // add some stuff in the north

final JPanel innerPanel = new JPanel(new GridLayout(1,0));
JLabel[] dashedLineLabel = new JLabel[wordLength];
for (int i = 0; i < wordLength; i++) {   
    dashedLineLabel[i] = new JLabel("__  ");
    dashedLineLabel[i].setFont(new Font("Serif", Font.BOLD, 30));
    innerPanel.add(dashedLineLabel[i]);
} 

panel.add(innerPanel, BorderLayout.CENTER);

Solution with MigLayout:

If you don't want to choose between different layouts, you can also use MigLayout, which is a 3rd party layout manager, that basically gives you all the options in one manager. And you will have a lot cleaner code (imho). The disadvantage is of course that you have to use an external jar file as dependency. (By the way: Since I found out about MigLayout, I have never used another layout manager again.)

With MigLayout:

final JPanel labelPanel = new JPanel(new MigLayout("", "", "")); 
panel.add(labelPanel, "north");

JLabel[] dashedLineLabel = new JLabel[wordLength];
for (int i = 0; i < wordLength; i++) {   
    dashedLineLabel[i] = new JLabel("__  ");
    dashedLineLabel[i].setFont(new Font("Serif", Font.BOLD, 30));
    panel.add(dashedLineLabel[i], "wrap");
}
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BorderLayout specification says

A border layout lays out a container, arranging and resizing its components to fit in five regions: north, south, east, west, and center. Each region may contain no more than one component, and is identified by a corresponding constant: NORTH, SOUTH, EAST, WEST, and CENTER. When adding a component to a container with a border layout, use one of these five constants,....

in here

As you are using the default add method, it adds components to the center of the parent and thus in your case you see only one component being added.

You can use other layout (i.e. flow or some other) to satisfy your need.

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If you use the BorderLayout and add components with the simple add method they are all added in the center. If center has no other container, they are all on top of each other and you can just see the top one. Use BorderLayout right or use another layout.

From the documentation of BorderLayout:

A border layout lays out a container, arranging and resizing its components to fit in five regions: north, south, east, west, and center. Each region may contain no more than one component, and is identified by a corresponding constant: NORTH, SOUTH, EAST, WEST, and CENTER. When adding a component to a container with a border layout, use one of these five constants, for example:

    Panel p = new Panel();
    p.setLayout(new BorderLayout());
    p.add(new Button("Okay"), BorderLayout.SOUTH);


As a convenience, BorderLayout interprets the absence of a string specification the same as the constant CENTER:

    Panel p2 = new Panel();
    p2.setLayout(new BorderLayout());
    p2.add(new TextArea());  // Same as p.add(new TextArea(), BorderLayout.CENTER);
share|improve this answer
    
Actually, I think they are not lying all on top of each other. If something is added to one of the cells, the component currently positioned in there is removed. Correct me if I am wrong. –  brimborium Oct 31 '12 at 14:06
    
@brimborium I always thought they were on top of each other but now I realize that this was just an assumption. Can't find any reference on what actually happens. –  André Stannek Oct 31 '12 at 14:45
1  
You could actually try it out. Just create a frame with a panel in it with BorderLayout. Add two labels to the same spot in that layout. Then remove the second one again, you will see that the first label doesn't show up again. –  brimborium Oct 31 '12 at 15:01
    
I would have tried it later today as I'm currently unable to. But now I won't have to, thanks :-) –  André Stannek Oct 31 '12 at 15:04

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