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I am trying to use templating to render a view initially, but to update the view on subsequent calls when it is part of the document.

My app's page looks a little something like

<body>
  <!-- ... -->
  <div id="view_placeholder"/>
  <!-- ... -->
</body>

And in pseudo-code I want to do something like so

Backbone.View.extend({
  // ...
  render: function() {
    if (this.el *IS NOT A CHILD OF document*) {
      // render the contents from the template
    } else {
      // update the content visibility based on the model
    }
  },
  // ...
});

The reason for this is that the template contains quite a lot of nodes and regenerating it for every change is not practicable.

I have explored some of the data-binding libraries, e.g. rivets.js but they are a poor fit to the template:model relation.

One thing I noticed is that this.el.parentNode==null before I add it to the document, but I am not sure that this is a definitive test, and in any case if I wrap this view within another, then that test becomes less useful (or maybe I am being overly cautious as once within another view's el I have rendered my sub-template anyway.

Another option I can see is to use a field to track the rendered status, e.g.

Backbone.View.extend({
  //
  templateRendered:false,
  // ...
  render: function() {
    if (!this.templateRendered) {
      // render the contents from the template
      this.templateRendered = true;
    } else {
      // update the content visibility based on the model
    }
  },
  // ...
});

but that feels hacky to me.

So my question is:

What is the best way to track the fact that I have rendered the template fully and therefore only need to tweak the rendered template rather than re-render it (and re-insert all the sub-views)?

share|improve this question
    
I am toying with this.el.parentNode != null && this.el.children.length() > 0 as a good test for the node being correctly rendered and inserted where it is supposed to be –  Stephen Connolly Oct 31 '12 at 13:45
    
You can use "lazy-loading" to replace the render function the second time it runs so that you don't run the check each time. –  Jack Oct 31 '12 at 13:50
    
Are you asking this question perhaps? –  mu is too short Oct 31 '12 at 15:53
    
Not quite because there is also that the element is populated with content... And then I need to take into account if somebody calls this.setElement() passing a non-empty element to wrap... Though I could be making this too complex for myself ;-) –  Stephen Connolly Oct 31 '12 at 20:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think the idiomatic backbone approach is to only call a full render() on your view when you want a full render, and use model change event bindings to call sub-render functions that render smaller portions of the view.

var AddressView = Backbone.View.extend({
    initialize: function (options) {
        Backbone.view.prototype.initialize.call(this, options);
        _.bindAll(this)
        options.model.on('change:name', this.renderName);
        options.model.on('change:street', this.renderStreet);
        options.model.on('change:zipCode', this.renderZipCode);
    },
    renderName: function (model) {
        this.$el.find("#name").text(model.get("name"));
    },
    renderZipCode: function (model) {
        this.$el.find("#zipcode").text(model.get("zipCode"));
    },
    renderStreet: function (model) {
        this.$el.find("#stree").text(model.get("street"));
    },
    render: function () {
        //Populate this.el with initial template, subviews, etc
        //assume this.template is a template function that can render the main HTML
        this.$el.html(this.template(model));
        this.renderName(this.model);
        this.renderZipCode(this.model);
        this.renderStreet(this.model);
        return this;
    }
});

Code as above is undoubtedly tedious. I would reconsider knockback.js or rivets.js, personally, but I believe the pattern above is the canonical vanilla backbone.js approach.

share|improve this answer
    
The issue I have with this technique is that it forces me to think when I want a render() call... Given that all this specific view does is show/hide the subviews the post initial render path will be quick. I am loath to pull in rivets for this as some of the sub-views are using rivets and two sets of bindings can cause issues... oh well... I'll see if I can come up with something better... if not I'll accept this answer ;-) –  Stephen Connolly Oct 31 '12 at 15:40
    
@StephenConnolly You can also just bind to the change event by itself and use your *post initial render` path there, for example you can create a refresh() method and just bind all changes to that method. –  Jack Oct 31 '12 at 15:54
    
So one thing to think about is good encapsulation. The view's job is to take the model data and render it into HTML inside this.el. Period. The view should not care about whether or not that el is attached to the DOM (ideally). Backbone is designed around views being dumb, models serving as pub/sub event busses, and everything being triggered off events firing off the models. I'm not saying this is the ultimate architecture, but it is how backbone is designed to work and when in doubt, try to stick to the basic principles BB embodies. –  Peter Lyons Oct 31 '12 at 19:11

I would avoid rendering a view until its element is about to be inserted. In any case, you can find out by checking the parent of the view's element, i.e.

 this.$el.parent()

should be empty if the this.$el is not part of your document.

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