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Would it be possible to wrap repetitive code like this:

IList<Bla1> Bla1s = (from a in Containers
       where a.Right.GetType().Name.Equals("Bla1")
select
(
  (Bla1) a.Right
)).Distinct().ToList<Bla1>();

into a generic construct (method?). There are many Blas (Bla1, Bla2 ...). I guess Bla would represent T but I have not much experience with generics for such situations. Thanks.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

If you want to test for the type and not just type name, then you can do:

IList<T> items = Containers.Select(c => c.Right).OfType<T>().Distinct().ToList();

Thus, your generic method could look like this:

IList<T> GenericMethod<T>()
{
    return Containers.Select(c => c.Right).OfType<T>().Distinct().ToList();
}

As hvd mentioned in the comments, the code above would also return any Right element that is of a type derived from T. If your intention is to filter for type T only, use this instead:

IList<T> GenericMethod<T>(IEnumerable<Container> containers)
{
    return containers.Select(c => c.Right)
        .Where(x => x.GetType() == typeof(T)).Cast<T>()
        .Distinct().ToList();
}
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Note: this means that a class derived from T will also be included. If that's not desirable, it's possible to use something like .Where(c => c.GetType() == typeof(T)).Cast<T>(). –  hvd Oct 31 '12 at 13:56
    
@hvd I have the feeling the OP wants to make an is T test, but you're right, that's not equivalent to the code in the question. I've edited my answer. –  w0lf Oct 31 '12 at 14:02
    
The last GenericMethod works fine. please add Containers to the signature though. Thanks! –  csetzkorn Oct 31 '12 at 14:09
    
@csetzkorn done –  w0lf Oct 31 '12 at 14:31

If the string you use is always exactly equal to the class name, then yes.

IList<T> Bla1s = (from a in Containers
       where a.Right.GetType().Name.Equals(typeof(T).Name)
select
(
  (T) a.Right
)).Distinct().ToList<T>();

Or drop the string entirely:

IList<T> Bla1s = (from a in Containers
       where a.Right.GetType().Equals(typeof(T))
select
(
  (T) a.Right
)).Distinct().ToList<T>();
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I tried something similar the challenge currently lies with making this a static method ... I get some namespace error although I have imported System.Collections.Generic. –  csetzkorn Oct 31 '12 at 14:03
    
@csetzkorn making it static is another issue entirely. I would imagine Containers is a non-static member of some class, and hence a static function couldn't get there. You'll have to add more code or post a different question to get a more specific answer on that. –  Jon B Oct 31 '12 at 14:04

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