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This is an excerpt from the book on C by Kernighan and Ritchie. It shows how to implement a version of malloc. Although well commented, I am having great difficulty in understanding it. Can somebody please explain it?

typedef long Align; /* for alignment to long boundary */
union header { /* block header */
struct {
union header *ptr; /* next block if on free list */
unsigned size; /* size of this block */
} s;
Align x; /* force alignment of blocks */
};
typedef union header Header;

static Header base; /* empty list to get started */
static Header *freep = NULL; /* start of free list */
/* malloc: general-purpose storage allocator */
void *malloc(unsigned nbytes)
{
   Header *p, *prevp;
   Header *morecore(unsigned);
   unsigned nunits;
   nunits = (nbytes+sizeof(Header)-1)/sizeof(header) + 1;
   if ((prevp = freep) == NULL) { /* no free list yet */
      base.s.ptr = freeptr = prevptr = &base;
      base.s.size = 0;
   }
   for (p = prevp->s.ptr; ; prevp = p, p = p->s.ptr) {
      if (p->s.size >= nunits) { /* big enough */
        if (p->s.size == nunits) /* exactly */
           prevp->s.ptr = p->s.ptr;
        else { /* allocate tail end */
           p->s.size -= nunits;
           p += p->s.size;
           p->s.size = nunits
             }
        freep = prevp;
        return (void *)(p+1);
      }
      if (p == freep) /* wrapped around free list */
         if ((p = morecore(nunits)) == NULL)
             return NULL; /* none left */
      }
}

The morecore function allocates memory using the Unix system call sbrk. (Please don't close the question, I have an interview nearby, and I need to know this! I have searched Google upside down!)

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migrated from codereview.stackexchange.com Oct 31 '12 at 13:52

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I've got my K&R 2nd edition in front of me - a pretty early printing I would imagine - and it doesn't contain some of the problems the accepted answer refers to. Can I ask which edition you used and whether you typed the code in by hand? –  user1681572 Nov 27 '13 at 10:54
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1 Answer

up vote 30 down vote accepted

Ok, what we have here is a chunk of really poorly written code. What I will do in this post could best be described as software archaeology.

Step 1: fix the formatting.

The indention and compact format doesn't do anyone any good. Various spaces and empty rows need to be inserted. The comments could be written in more readable ways. I'll start by fixing that.

At the same time I'm changing the brace style from K&R style - please note that the K&R brace style is acceptable, this is merely a personal preference of mine. Another personal preference is to write the * for pointers next to the type pointed at. I'll not argue about (subjective) style matters here.

Also, the type definition of Header is completely unreadable, it needs a drastic fix.

And I spotted something completely obscure: they seem to have declared a function prototype inside the function. Header* morecore(unsigned);. This is very old and very poor style, and I'm not sure if C even allows it any longer. Lets just remove that line, whatever that function does, it will have to be defined elsewhere.

typedef long Align;                      /* for alignment to long boundary */

typedef union header                     /* block header */
{
  struct
  {
    union header *ptr;                   /* next block if on free list */
    unsigned size;                       /* size of this block */
  } s;

  Align x;                               /* force alignment of blocks */

} Header;


static Header base;                      /* empty list to get started */
static Header* freep = NULL;             /* start of free list */


/* malloc: general-purpose storage allocator */
void* malloc (unsigned nbytes)
{
  Header*   p;
  Header*   prevp;
  unsigned  nunits;

  nunits = (nbytes + sizeof(Header) - 1) / sizeof(header) + 1;

  if ((prevp = freep) == NULL)           /* no free list yet */
  {
    base.s.ptr = freeptr = prevptr = &base;
    base.s.size = 0;
  }

  for (p = prevp->s.ptr; ; prevp = p, p = p->s.ptr)
  {
    if (p->s.size >= nunits)             /* big enough */
    {
      if (p->s.size == nunits)           /* exactly */
        prevp->s.ptr = p->s.ptr;
      else                               /* allocate tail end */
      {
        p->s.size -= nunits;
        p += p->s.size;
        p->s.size = nunits
      }

      freep = prevp;
      return (void *)(p+1);
    }

    if (p == freep)                      /* wrapped around free list */
      if ((p = morecore(nunits)) == NULL)
        return NULL;                     /* none left */
  }
}

Ok now we might actually be able to read the code.

Step 2: weed out widely-recognized bad practice.

This code is filled with things that are nowadays regarded as bad practice. They need to be removed, since they jeopardize the safety, readability and maintenance of the code. If you want a reference to an authority preaching the same practices as me, check out the widely-recognized coding standard MISRA-C.

I have spotted and removed the following bad practices:

1) Just typing unsigned in the code could lead to be confusion: was this a typo by the programmer or was the intention to write unsigned int? We should replace all unsigned with unsigned int. But as we do that, we find that it is used in this context to give the size of various binary data. The correct type to use for such matters is the C standard type size_t. This is essentially just an unsigned int as well, but it is guaranteed to be "large enough" for the particular platform. The sizeof operator returns a result of type size_t and if we look at the C standard's definition of the real malloc, it is void *malloc(size_t size);. So size_t is the most correct type to use.

2) It is a bad idea to use the same name for our own malloc function as the one residing in stdlib.h. Should we need to include stdlib.h, things will get messy. As a rule of thumb, never use identifier names of C standard library functions in your own code. I'll change the name to kr_malloc.

3) The code is abusing the fact that all static variables are guaranteed to be initialized to zero. This is well-defined by the C standard, but a rather subtle rule. Lets initialize all statics explicitly, to show that we haven't forgotten to init them by accident.

4) Assignment inside conditions is dangerous and hard to read. This should be avoided if possible, since it can also lead to bugs, such as the classic = vs == bug.

5) Multiple assignments on the same row is hard to read, and also possibly dangerous, because of the order of evaluation.

6) Multiple declarations on the same row is hard to read, and dangerous, since it could lead to bugs when mixing data and pointer declarations. Always declare each variable on a row of its own.

7) Always uses braces after every statement. Not doing so will lead to bugs bugs bugs.

8) Never type cast from a specific pointer type to void*. It is unnecessary in C, and could hide away bugs that the compiler would otherwise have detected.

9) Avoid using multiple return statements inside a function. Sometimes they lead to clearer code, but in most cases they lead to spaghetti. As the code stands, we can't change that without rewriting the loop though, so I will fix this later.

10) Keep for loops simple. They should contain one init statement, one loop condition and one iteration, nothing else. This for loop, with the comma operator and everything, is very obscure. Again, we spot a need to rewrite this loop into something sane. I'll do this next, but for now we have:

typedef long Align;                      /* for alignment to long boundary */

typedef union header                     /* block header */
{
  struct
  {
    union header *ptr;                   /* next block if on free list */
    size_t size;                         /* size of this block */
  } s;

  Align x;                               /* force alignment of blocks */

} Header;


static Header base = {0};                /* empty list to get started */
static Header* freep = NULL;             /* start of free list */


/* malloc: general-purpose storage allocator */
void* kr_malloc (size_t nbytes)
{
  Header*  p;
  Header*  prevp;
  size_t   nunits;

  nunits = (nbytes + sizeof(Header) - 1) / sizeof(header) + 1;

  prevp = freep;
  if (prevp == NULL)                     /* no free list yet */
  {
    base.s.ptr  = &base;
    freeptr     = &base;
    prevptr     = &base;
    base.s.size = 0;
  }

  for (p = prevp->s.ptr; ; prevp = p, p = p->s.ptr)
  {
    if (p->s.size >= nunits)             /* big enough */
    {
      if (p->s.size == nunits)           /* exactly */
      {
        prevp->s.ptr = p->s.ptr;
      }
      else                               /* allocate tail end */
      {
        p->s.size -= nunits;
        p += p->s.size;
        p->s.size = nunits
      }

      freep = prevp;
      return p+1;
    }

    if (p == freep)                      /* wrapped around free list */
    {
      p = morecore(nunits);
      if (p == NULL)
      {
        return NULL;                     /* none left */
      }
    }
  } /* for */
}

Step 3: rewrite the obscure loop.

For the reasons mentioned earlier. We can see that this loop goes on forever, it terminates by returning from the function, either when the allocation is done, or when there is no memory left. So lets create that as a loop condition, and lift out the return to the end of the function where it should be. And lets get rid of that ugly comma operator.

I'll introduce two new variables: one result variable to hold the resulting pointer, and another to keep track of whether the loop should continue or not. I'll blow K&R's minds by using the bool type, which is part of the C language since 1999.

(I hope I haven't altered the algorithm with this change, I believe I haven't)

#include <stdbool.h>

typedef long Align;                      /* for alignment to long boundary */

typedef union header                     /* block header */
{
  struct
  {
    union header *ptr;                   /* next block if on free list */
    size_t size;                         /* size of this block */
  } s;

  Align x;                               /* force alignment of blocks */

} Header;


static Header base = {0};                /* empty list to get started */
static Header* freep = NULL;             /* start of free list */


/* malloc: general-purpose storage allocator */
void* kr_malloc (size_t nbytes)
{
  Header*  p;
  Header*  prevp;
  size_t   nunits;
  void*    result;
  bool     is_allocating;

  nunits = (nbytes + sizeof(Header) - 1) / sizeof(header) + 1;

  prevp = freep;
  if (prevp == NULL)                     /* no free list yet */
  {
    base.s.ptr  = &base;
    freeptr     = &base;
    prevptr     = &base;
    base.s.size = 0;
  }

  is_allocating = true;
  for (p = prevp->s.ptr; is_allocating; p = p->s.ptr)
  {
    if (p->s.size >= nunits)             /* big enough */
    {
      if (p->s.size == nunits)           /* exactly */
      {
        prevp->s.ptr = p->s.ptr;
      }
      else                               /* allocate tail end */
      {
        p->s.size -= nunits;
        p += p->s.size;
        p->s.size = nunits
      }

      freep = prevp;
      result = p+1;
      is_allocating = false;             /* we are done */
    }

    if (p == freep)                      /* wrapped around free list */
    {
      p = morecore(nunits);
      if (p == NULL)
      {
        result = NULL;                   /* none left */
        is_allocating = false;
      }
    }
    prevp = p;
  } /* for */

  return result;
}

Step 4: make this crap compile.

Since this is from K&R, it is filled with typos. sizeof(header) should be sizeof(Header). There are missing semi-colons. They use different names freep, prevp versus freeptr, prevptr, but clearly mean the same variable. I believe the latter were actually better names, so lets use those.

#include <stdbool.h>

typedef long Align;                      /* for alignment to long boundary */

typedef union header                     /* block header */
{
  struct
  {
    union header *ptr;                   /* next block if on free list */
    size_t size;                         /* size of this block */
  } s;

  Align x;                               /* force alignment of blocks */

} Header;


static Header base = {0};                /* empty list to get started */
static Header* freeptr = NULL;           /* start of free list */


/* malloc: general-purpose storage allocator */
void* kr_malloc (size_t nbytes)
{
  Header*  p;
  Header*  prevptr;
  size_t   nunits;
  void*    result;
  bool     is_allocating;

  nunits = (nbytes + sizeof(Header) - 1) / sizeof(Header) + 1;

  prevptr = freeptr;
  if (prevptr == NULL)                   /* no free list yet */
  {
    base.s.ptr  = &base;
    freeptr     = &base;
    prevptr     = &base;
    base.s.size = 0;
  }

  is_allocating = true;
  for (p = prevptr->s.ptr; is_allocating; p = p->s.ptr)
  {
    if (p->s.size >= nunits)             /* big enough */
    {
      if (p->s.size == nunits)           /* exactly */
      {
        prevptr->s.ptr = p->s.ptr;
      }
      else                               /* allocate tail end */
      {
        p->s.size -= nunits;
        p += p->s.size;
        p->s.size = nunits;
      }

      freeptr = prevptr;
      result = p+1;
      is_allocating = false;             /* we are done */
    }

    if (p == freeptr)                    /* wrapped around free list */
    {
      p = morecore(nunits);
      if (p == NULL)
      {
        result = NULL;                   /* none left */
        is_allocating = false;
      }
    }
    prevptr = p;
  } /* for */

  return result;
}

And now we have somewhat readable, maintainable code, without numerous dangerous practices, that will even compile! So now we could actually start to ponder about what the code is actually doing.

The struct "Header" is, as you might have guessed, the declaration of a node in a linked list. Each such node contains a pointer to the next one. I don't quite understand the morecore function, nor the "wrap-around", I have never used this function, nor sbrk. But I assume that it allocates a header as specified in this struct, and also some chunk of raw data following that header. If so, that explains why there is no actual data pointer: the data is assumed to follow the header, adjacently in memory. So for each node, we get the header, and we get a chunk of raw data following the header.

The iteration itself is pretty straight-forward, they are going through a single-linked list, one node at a time.

At the end of the loop, they set the pointer to point one past the end of the "chunk", then store that in a static variable, so that the program will remember where it previously allocated memory, next time the function is called.

They are using a trick to make their header end up on an aligned memory address: they store all the overhead info in a union together with a variable large enough to correspond to the platform's alignment requirement. So if the size of "ptr" plus the size of "size" are too small to give the exact alignment, the union guarantees that at least sizeof(Align) bytes are allocated. I believe that this whole trick is obsolete today, since the C standard mandates automatic struct/union padding.

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4  
Most of the bad practices you mentioned aren't, they're language features. I kind of agree with #1; #2 is irrelevant, and the rest is a matter of style. –  netcoder Oct 31 '12 at 13:57
6  
In my 25+ years of coding, this is the first time I've ever heard K&R called "incredibly hyped up" and flawed. –  Rob Oct 31 '12 at 13:59
10  
@Rob Are you also using 25+ years old compilers? 25+ year old OS? On a 25+ year old computer? There is plenty of perfectly valid criticism against the book if you only look around. If you are going to down vote me just because I told you that the sun is the center of the solar system, and not the earth, at least provide some rationale over why you think I'm wrong. I'd just love to hear your logical reasoning over why the original code is oh-so-good. It will even enforce you to make your own opinion about the book, instead of following the convenient bandwagon. –  Lundin Oct 31 '12 at 14:21
3  
If you look around enough you can find criticism of anything but this is hardly the place to do any of the things you are asking. –  Rob Oct 31 '12 at 14:29
2  
@Cupidvogel: Spreading information as factual when it is totally subjective is a good enough reason for me. –  netcoder Oct 31 '12 at 20:07
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