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For a class Foo, is there a way to disallow constructing it without giving it a name?

For example:

Foo("hi");

And only allow it if you give it a name, like the following?

Foo my_foo("hi");

The lifetime of the first one is just the statement, and the second one is the enclosing block. In my use case, Foo is measuring the time between constructor and destructor. Since I never refer to the local variable, I often forget to put it in, and accidentally change the lifetime. I'd like to get a compile time error instead.

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8  
This could also come in handy for mutex lock guards. –  lucas clemente Oct 31 '12 at 14:02
1  
Well, you could write your own C++ compiler where it was forbidden, but strictly speaking it wouldn't be C++ then. There are also places where temporaries like that would be useful, like when returning an object from a function for example (like return std::string("Foo");) –  Joachim Pileborg Oct 31 '12 at 14:02
2  
Nope, you can't do this, sorry –  Armen Tsirunyan Oct 31 '12 at 14:03
2  
Depending on your religion this might be a case where macros could come handy (by usnig that type only ever via a macro that always creates a varaible) –  PlasmaHH Oct 31 '12 at 14:04
3  
Seems more like something I'd want my LINT tool to catch than something I'd want to syntactically prevent by a compiler hack. –  Warren P Oct 31 '12 at 19:26

10 Answers 10

up vote 101 down vote accepted

Another macro-based solution:

#define Foo class Foo

The statement Foo("hi"); expands to class Foo("hi");, which is ill-formed; but Foo a("hi") expands to class Foo a("hi"), which is correct.

This has the advantage that it is both source- and binary-compatible with existing (correct) code. (This claim is not entirely correct - please see Johannes Schaub's Comment and ensuing discussion below: "How can you know that it is source compatible with existing code? His friend includes his header and has void f() { int Foo = 0; } which previously compiled fine and now miscompiles! Also, every line that defines a member function of class Foo fails: void class Foo::bar() {}")

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3  
+1, this is awesome! –  avakar Oct 31 '12 at 14:55
7  
@BarnabasSzabolcs, if you define the macro after the class definition, you can still write class Foo { public: ... }. –  dbaupp Oct 31 '12 at 16:40
46  
How can you know that it is source compatible with existing code? His friend includes his header and has void f() { int Foo = 0; } which previously compiled fine and now miscompiles! Also, every line that defines a member function of class Foo fails: void class Foo::bar() {}. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Oct 31 '12 at 22:31
3  
-1 for reason explained by Johannes –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Oct 31 '12 at 22:37
20  
How can this get so many votes? Just look at the comment by @JohannesSchaub-litb and you will understand that this is a really bad solution. Because all of the definitions of member functions are invalid after this.. -1 from my side –  Aamir Nov 1 '12 at 5:16

How about a little hack

class Foo
{
    public:
        Foo (const char*) {}
};

void Foo (float);


int main ()
{
    Foo ("hello"); // error
    class Foo a("hi"); // OK
    return 1;
}
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1  
Great Hack! One note: Foo a("hi"); (without class) would be an error, too. –  bitmask Oct 31 '12 at 14:23
11  
+1 for being evil ;) –  Matthieu M. Oct 31 '12 at 14:24
    
I'm not sure I understand. Foo("hello") tries to call void Foo(float) and it results in a linker error ? But why is the float version called instead of the Foo ctor ? –  undu Oct 31 '12 at 15:01
2  
undu, hm what compiler are you using? gcc 3.4 complains that there is no conversion to float. It tries to call a function Foo because it takes a precedence over a class. –  user1773602 Oct 31 '12 at 15:07
1  
@didierc no, Foo::Foo("hi") is disallowed in C++. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Oct 31 '12 at 22:42

Make the constructor private but give the class a create method.

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7  
+1 This method is the only non-hack I've seen. –  andre Oct 31 '12 at 14:59
7  
-1: How does this solve the OP's problem at all? You can still write Foo::create(); over Foo const & x = Foo::create(); –  Thomas Eding Oct 31 '12 at 21:23
    
@ThomasEding I guess you are right, it doesn't fix OP's core problem, but just forces him think and not make the mistake he is making. –  user814628 Oct 31 '12 at 22:06
1  
@ThomasEding you cannot protect yourself against angry users that want to break the system. Even with @ecatmur's hack you can say std::common_type<Foo>::type() and you get a temporary. Or even typedef Foo bar; bar(). –  Johannes Schaub - litb Nov 2 '12 at 21:38
    
@JohannesSchaub-litb: But the big difference is whether or not it was by mistake or not. There's almost no way typing std::common_type<Foo>::type() is by mistake. Leaving out the Foo const & x = ... by accident is totally believable. –  Thomas Eding Nov 2 '12 at 21:43

This one doesn't result in a compiler error, but a runtime error. Instead of measuring a wrong time, you get an exception which may be acceptable too.

Any constructor you want to guard needs a default argument on which set(guard) is called.

struct Guard {
  Guard()
    :guardflagp()
  { }

  ~Guard() {
    assert(guardflagp && "Forgot to call guard?");
    *guardflagp = 0;
  }

  void *set(Guard const *&guardflag) {
    if(guardflagp) {
      *guardflagp = 0;
    }

    guardflagp = &guardflag;
    *guardflagp = this;
  }

private:
  Guard const **guardflagp;
};

class Foo {
public:
  Foo(const char *arg1, Guard &&g = Guard()) 
    :guard()
  { g.set(guard); }

  ~Foo() {
    assert(!guard && "A Foo object cannot be temporary!");
  }

private:
  mutable Guard const *guard;
}; 

The characteristics are:

Foo f() {
  // OK (no temporary)
  Foo f1("hello");

  // may throw (may introduce a temporary on behalf of the compiler)
  Foo f2 = "hello";

  // may throw (introduces a temporary that may be optimized away
  Foo f3 = Foo("hello");

  // OK (no temporary)
  Foo f4{"hello"};

  // OK (no temporary)
  Foo f = { "hello" };

  // always throws
  Foo("hello");

  // OK (normal copy)
  return f;

  // may throw (may introduce a temporary on behalf of the compiler)
  return "hello";

  // OK (initialized temporary lives longer than its initializers)
  return { "hello" };
}

int main() {
  // OK (it's f that created the temporary in its body)
  f();

  // OK (normal copy)
  Foo g1(f());

  // OK (normal copy)
  Foo g2 = f();
}

The case of f2, f3 and the return of "hello" may not be wanted. To prevent throwing, you can allow the source of a copy to be a temporary, by resetting the guard to now guard us instead of the source of the copy. Now you also see why we used the pointers above - it allows us to be flexible.

class Foo {
public:
  Foo(const char *arg1, Guard &&g = Guard()) 
    :guard()
  { g.set(guard); }

  Foo(Foo &&other)
    :guard(other.guard)
  {
    if(guard) {
      guard->set(guard);
    }
  }

  Foo(const Foo& other)
    :guard(other.guard)
  {
    if(guard) {
      guard->set(guard);
    }
  }

  ~Foo() {
    assert(!guard && "A Foo object cannot be temporary!");
  }

private:
  mutable Guard const *guard;
}; 

The characteristics for f2, f3 and for return "hello" are now always // OK.

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1  
Foo f = "hello"; // may throw This is enough to scare me into never using this code. –  Thomas Eding Nov 1 '12 at 18:21
4  
@thomas, i recommend to mark the constructor explicit and then such code no more compiles. the goal was to fotbid the temporary, and it does. if you are scared, you can make it not throw by setting the source of a copy in the copy or move constructor to be a nontemporary. then only the final object of several copies may throw if it still ends up as a temporary. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Nov 1 '12 at 22:02
2  
My god. I'm not novice in C++ and C++11, but I can't understand how does this work. Could you please add a couple of explanations?.. –  Mikhail Nov 2 '12 at 21:52
5  
@Mikhail the order of destruction of temporary objects that are destroyed at the same points is the reverse order of their construction. The default argument that the caller passes is a temporary. If the Foo object is a temporary too, and its lifetime ends in the same expression as the default argument, then the Foo object's dtor will be invoked before the default argument's dtor, because the former was created after the latter. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Nov 2 '12 at 22:15
1  
@JohannesSchaub-litb Very nice trick. I really thought it is impossible to distinguish Foo(...); and Foo foo(...); from inside the Foo. –  Mikhail Nov 2 '12 at 22:21

A few years ago I wrote a patch for the GNU C++ compiler which adds a new warning option for that situation. This is tracked in a Bugzilla item.

Unfortunately, GCC Bugzilla is a burial ground where well-considered patch-included feature suggestions go to die. :)

This was motivated by the desire to catch exactly the sort of bugs that are the subject of this question in code which uses local objects as gadgets for locking and unlocking, measuring execution time and so forth.

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As is, with your implementation, you cannot do this, but you can use this rule to your advantage:

Temporary objects cannot be bound to non-const references

You can move the code from the class to an freestanding function which takes a non-const reference parameter. If you do so, You will get a compiler error if an temporary tries to bind to the non-const reference.

Code Sample

class Foo
{
    public:
        Foo(const char* ){}
        friend void InitMethod(Foo& obj);
};

void InitMethod(Foo& obj){}

int main()
{
    Foo myVar("InitMe");
    InitMethod(myVar);    //Works

    InitMethod("InitMe"); //Does not work  
    return 0;
}

Output

prog.cpp: In function ‘int main()’:
prog.cpp:13: error: invalid initialization of non-const reference of type ‘Foo&’ from a temporary of type ‘const char*’
prog.cpp:7: error: in passing argument 1 of ‘void InitMethod(Foo&)’
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1  
@didierc: No they cannot –  Alok Save Oct 31 '12 at 14:28
1  
@didierc: Provided they provide a additional function.It's up to you to not do so.We are trying to tweak a way to achieve something not explicitly allowed by the standard, so ofcourse there will be restrictions. –  Alok Save Oct 31 '12 at 14:39
    
@didierc the parameter x is a named object so it is not clear whether we really want to forbid it. If the constructor you would have used is explicit, may people would instinctively do Foo f = Foo("hello");. I think they would become angry if it failed. My solution initially rejected it (and very similar cases) with an exception/assert-failure and someone complained. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Nov 2 '12 at 21:42
    
@JohannesSchaub-litb Yes, OP wants to forbid discarding the value generated by a constructor by forcing bindings. My example is wrong. –  didierc Nov 3 '12 at 9:58

No, I'm afraid this isn't possible. But you could get the same effect by creating a macro.

#define FOO(x) Foo _foo(x)

With this in place, you can just write FOO(x) instead of Foo my_foo(x).

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5  
I was going to upvote, but then I saw "you could create a macro". –  Griwes Oct 31 '12 at 14:06
1  
Ok, fixed the underscores. @Griwes - Don't be a fundamentalist. It is better to say "use a macro" than "this can't be done". –  amaurea Oct 31 '12 at 14:10
4  
Well, it can't be done. You haven't solved the problem at all, it's still perfectly legal to do Foo();. –  Puppy Oct 31 '12 at 14:11
11  
Now you are being stubborn here. Rename the Foo class something complicated, and call the macro Foo. Problem solved. –  amaurea Oct 31 '12 at 14:13
8  
Something like: class Do_not_use_this_class_directly_Only_use_it_via_the_FOO_macro; –  Benjamin Lindley Oct 31 '12 at 14:21

Simply don't have a default constructor, and do require a reference to an instance in every constructor.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

enum SelfRef { selfRef };

struct S
{
    S( SelfRef, S const & ) {}
};

int main()
{
    S a( selfRef, a );
}
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3  
Nice idea, but as soon as you have one variable: S(selfRef, a);. :/ –  Xeo Oct 31 '12 at 23:16
2  
@Xeo S(SelfRef, S const& s) { assert(&s == this); }, if a runtime error is acceptable. –  user142019 Oct 31 '12 at 23:18

Since the primary goal is to prevent bugs, consider this:

struct Foo
{
  Foo( const char* ) { /* ... */ }
};

enum { Foo };

int main()
{
  struct Foo foo( "hi" ); // OK
  struct Foo( "hi" ); // fail
  Foo foo( "hi" ); // fail
  Foo( "hi" ); // fail
}

That way you can't forget to name the variable and you can't forget to write struct. Verbose, but safe.

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Declare one-parametric constructor as explicit and nobody will ever create an object of that class unintentionally.

For example

class Foo
{
public: 
  explicit Foo(const char*);
};

void fun(const Foo&);

can only be used this way

void g() {
  Foo a("text");
  fun(a);
}

but never this way (through a temporary on the stack)

void g() {
  fun("text");
}

See also: Alexandrescu, C++ Coding Standards, Item 40.

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2  
This does allow fun(Foo("text"));. –  Guilherme Bernal Nov 7 '12 at 23:49

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