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I've been building a small access rules module for a project where every particular rule is reflected by a generic Rule<TEntity> object. The rule takes a delegate to execute a certain logic.

There is a RulesContext class that provides methods to check access to a certain entity "foo" like this:

rulesContext.CanIRead<Foo>(myFoo);

My intention was to store all rules build during a setup process into one collection. But every approach I tried lead to a dead end.

I thought of something like:

IDictionary<Type, Rule<object>> _rules = new Dictionary<Type, Rule<object>>();

and:

var fooRule = new Rule<Foo>(foo => foo.FullfillsACertainFooCriterion())
_rules.Add(typeof(Foo), fooRule);

The CanIRead implementation would make sure to use the dictionary properly:

public bool CanIRead<TEntity>(TEntity entity)
{
    var rule = _rules[typeof(entity)];
    return rule.CanIRead(entity);
}

But the compiler does not like this: Rule<Foo> cannot be assigned to a parameter of type Rule<object>. Which kind of makes sense since it would break the contract (which says that I can use the dictionary's methods with any object as parameter which does not hold true for the fooRule which only accepts Foo typed objects. - Liskov principle)

However I cannot think of a way to solve this. How could I store Rule objects with different types in one collection?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Instead of using IDictionary<Type, object> which could hold anything (e.g. DateTime) as a value in the dictionary, you could make the values strictly Rule objects

Here

namespace RuleConsole
{
   class Program
   {
      static void Main(string[] args)
      {
         var context = new RulesContext();

         var objA = new A();
         var objB = new B();

         context.AddRule<A>(new Rule<A>(objA));
         context.AddRule<B>(new Rule<B>(objB));

         Console.WriteLine(context.CanIRead<A>(objA));
         Console.WriteLine(context.CanIRead<B>(objB));

         Console.ReadKey();
      }
   }

   public interface IRule { }
   public interface IRule<T> : IRule { }

   public class Rule<T> : IRule<T> 
   {
      T _entity;
      public Rule(T entity)
      {
         _entity = entity;
      }
   }

   public class A { }
   public class B { }

   public class RulesContext
   {
      Dictionary<Type, IRule> _ruleDict= new Dictionary<Type, IRule>();

      public void AddRule<TEntity>(Rule<TEntity> rule)
      {
         _ruleDict.Add(typeof(TEntity), rule);
      }

      public bool CanIRead<TEntity>(TEntity entity)
      {
         var rule = (IRule<TEntity>)_ruleDict[typeof(TEntity)];

         //CanIRead implementation here

         return rule != null;
      }
   }
}
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Thank you. I think the core message of your code is that IRule<T> derives from IRule. I'll have a closer look at it. –  chiccodoro Nov 9 '12 at 12:30
    
Tested it. Very nice and clean way to achieve exactly what I wanted. In my original question I mentioned IDictionary<Type, Rule<object>>. Only in my own answer I changed it to be IDictionary<Type, object> so I presume your first statement refers to my own answer. It may be worthwhile for future readers if you make that a bit clearer or complete your answer such that mine does not need to be read first. –  chiccodoro Nov 13 '12 at 10:53

Can you do this:

[TestFixture]
public class ContraVariance
{
    [Test]
    public void TestNameTest()
    {
        var rules = new List<IRule<object>>(); //object is used just for demo here, probably some interface of yours is better
        rules.Add(new Rule<A>());
        rules.Add(new Rule<B>());
    }
}
public class A { }
public class B { }

public class Rule<TEntity> : IRule<TEntity>
{

}

public interface IRule<out T>
{
}

If not I think you have to have a non-generic IRule or RuleBase (class) The out keyword int the interface means that T is out only (Covariant) you can read about it here. I guess that out will be a problem in your case, i suspect that the rules have methods with TEntity passed as arguments.

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wow, you're just about to teach me a new concept :-) It compiles. Will have to read up upon contravariance –  chiccodoro Oct 31 '12 at 14:23
    
Pro tip : never try to remember which is which of Covariance/Contravariance. Only Jon Skeet and Chuck Norris can answer that question and CN has it scribbled on his hand. I think something more intuitive like InOnly/OutOnly had been better. –  Johan Larsson Oct 31 '12 at 14:26
    
Yeah, just realized I was excited to quickly. Since the contravariant keyword out means that T is only used as return type, I cannot use it for my case where it is a method parameter. In other terms, the covariant/contravariant features are completely "legal" - they don't allow to break the contract... –  chiccodoro Oct 31 '12 at 14:30
    
BTW - by "breaking the contract" I'm referring to the following rule which I forgot the name of: Whenever you define a subclass of a given base class, the preconditions (in particular parameter types) of the subclass must not be more constrained than the ones of the base class, and the post conditions (in particular the return type) must at least meet the post conditions of the base class. –  chiccodoro Oct 31 '12 at 14:32
    
It can maybe be solved by your IRule<T> exporting delegates or writing extension methods for IRule<T> –  Johan Larsson Oct 31 '12 at 14:33

That's inherently non-type-safe.
What do you want to happen if you write

_rules[typeof(Foor)].CanRead(new Bar());

You need to make a non-generic base class or interface to store in the dictionary.

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Yes, I'm actually aware of that. I'd love to hide the dictionary from the outside and make sure the public methods handle it right, but I'm clear that the compiler is not interested in my plans :-) Still I'm wondering how to solve this properly - a base class as you're suggesting does not solve the problem. object already is a base class, it's the most generic one there is. Or I didn't grab what you were saying. –  chiccodoro Oct 31 '12 at 14:20

Well, this is almost embarassing - but I think you've just helped me unblock my brain :-)

If the problem is that IDictionary<Type, Rule<object>> is too specific, IDictionary<Type, object> does the trick:

var fooRule = new Rule<Foo>(foo => foo.FullfillsACertainFooCriterion())
_rules.Add(typeof(Foo), fooRule);

(same as in the question, but compiles this time)

public bool CanIRead<TEntity>(TEntity entity)
{
    var rule = (Rule<TEntity>)_rules[typeof(entity)];
    return rule.CanIRead(entity);
}

The blocker in my brain was that I was thinking the more generic the type argument within Rule<...> was, the more objects should be allowed in the dictionary, but in this case it is the other way around: The more generic that argument is, the more specific the contract gets.

Take:

IDictionary<Rule<Foo>>

by replacing Rule by its base class object, the dictionary gets more generic. However, by replacing Foo by object, the whole thing actually gets more specialized!

The whole reason for that is that the type argument of Rule is used as an input parameter.

That's an important lesson...

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