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Suppose I have a list of ip that i don't want to copy in a text file. Here's what i do.. For example i don't want to copy 192.168.5.20...

In my temp.txt file i have ip's:

192.168.5.20
192.168.5.10
192.168.5.30
192.168.5.50
192.168.5.12

-

char *data = "192.168.5.20";

char buff[100];
FILE *in, *out;

in = fopen("/tmp/temp.txt", "r");

while(fgets(buff,sizeof(buff),in) !=NULL){


        if(!strstr(buff, data)){

        printf("copying to ip.txt\n");
        out = fopen("/tmp/ip.txt", "a");
        fprintf(out,"%s",buff);
        fclose(out);
        }


}
if(feof(in)){

printf("Closing file descriptor and renaming ip.txt to temp.txt\n");
fclose(in);
rename("/tmp/ip.txt", "/tmp/temp.txt");
}

It work's leaving 192.168.5.20 ip.. but my problem is when temp.txt have only one ip.. e.g 192.168.5.20

Now i want to ignore it so when i open up my temp.txt file it should be blank. but still ip 192.168.5.20 is there when i open up my temp.txt file?.. Why is it doing that?.

Thanks..

share|improve this question
1  
Of course not, there's no /tmp/ip.txt. –  Daniel Fischer Oct 31 '12 at 14:33
    
Sorry about that. just modified it..Yes it does succeed in renaming the ip.txt to temp.txt.. but still when i run it i still get 192.168.5.20 in temp.txt –  demic0de Oct 31 '12 at 14:38
    
To get thing done, you can use grep -v PATTERN file –  kev Oct 31 '12 at 14:47
    
What does grep -v PATTERN file does?.. thanks –  demic0de Oct 31 '12 at 14:48
    
Thanks all i got it working.. Daniel Fischer thanks didn't notice that ip.txt is not being created. –  demic0de Oct 31 '12 at 14:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The file /tmp/ip.txt is only created when there is at least one line in /tmp/temp.txt that doesn't contain the pattern to be ignored.

if(!strstr(buff, data)){
    printf("copying to ip.txt\n");
    out = fopen("/tmp/ip.txt", "a");
    fprintf(out,"%s",buff);
    fclose(out);
}

So if /tmp/temp.txt contains only one line, and that contains the pattern to be ignored, no /tmp/ip.txt is created, and rename fails, setting errno to ENOENT.

Check that with

#include <errno.h>
#include <string.h>

int fail = rename("/home/dafis/Doesntexist", "/home/dafis/doesexist");
if (fail) {
    int en = errno;
    if (en)
        perror(strerror(en));
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot.. I didn't noticed that ip.txt is not being created. –  demic0de Oct 31 '12 at 14:55

If there is only 192.168.5.20 in the file temp.txt, you are not even entering the while loop. That means you are not opening (creating if not existing) ip.txt. So rename fails and temp.txt remains the same. You can try changing your code as following

   if (feof(in))
   {
      if(0 == out)
         out = fopen("ip.txt", "a");
      printf("\nrename returned %d",rename("ip.txt", "temp.txt"));

      printf("Closing file descriptor and renaming ip.txt to temp.txt\n");
      fclose(in);
   }

Do add some NULL checks in the code. Saves precious time.

share|improve this answer
char *unwanted = "192.168.5.20";

char buff[100];
FILE *in, *out;
unsigned cnt;

in = fopen("/tmp/temp.txt", "r");
out = fopen("/tmp/ip.txt", "w");

if (!in || !out) exit(EXIT_FAILURE);

for (cnt=0; fgets(buff,sizeof buff,in) ; ){
        if(strstr(buff, unwanted)) continue;
        fprintf(out,"%s",buff);
        cnt++;
        }

fclose(out);
fclose(in);

 /* note: this will maintain the original file if it **only** consists
 ** of lines with the (unwanted) pattern in it.
 ** IMHO you'd better do the rename unconditionally; an empty file
 ** would be the correct result if all the lines match.
 */
if(cnt){ 
    printf("Closing file descriptor and renaming ip.txt to temp.txt\n");
    rename("/tmp/ip.txt", "/tmp/temp.txt");
    }
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