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What version control systems have you used with MS Excel (2003/2007)? What would you recommend and Why? What limitations have you found with your top rated version control system?

To put this in perspective, here are a couple of use cases:

  1. version control for VBA modules
  2. more than one person is working on a Excel spreadsheet and they may be making changes to the same worksheet, which they want to merge and integrate. This worksheet may have formulae, data, charts etc
  3. the users are not too technical and the fewer version control systems used the better
  4. Space constraint is a consideration. Ideally only incremental changes are saved rather than the entire Excel spreadsheet.
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15  
Google Apps/Docs does not have the full functionality of MS Excel, which you need to do more advanced work like modelling. –  TheObserver Jan 18 '10 at 1:33
19  
@Richie Cotton. If that was a practical option (i.e. using matlab/python) then ALL financial companies would have changed over by now. Asking people that analyse finanical models but are not programmers to be programmers is on the whole fraught with danger and realitively impractical. –  Anonymous Type Jun 7 '11 at 1:51
1  
stackoverflow.com/q/608872/107537 see similar question here. But it doesn't address the worksheets themselves. Only the VBA code. –  Vijay Mar 12 '13 at 11:42
3  
Those blaming Excel modelling for the credit crunch are most likely the fraudsters intentionally selling junk as AAA. You don't need a spreadsheet to tell you an investment is crap. Being a finance guy, I can tell you full dependency on any model is a sure-fire way to a losing your ass. Furthermore, any models are only as good as the people who built them. If you hire Morts to do the work of Einsteins, you're gonna have a bad time. –  Eric J Jul 15 '13 at 20:51

17 Answers 17

up vote 41 down vote accepted

I've just setup a spreadsheet that uses Bazaar, with manual checkin/out via TortiseBZR. Given that the topic helped me with the save portion, I wanted to post my solution here.

The solution for me was to create a spreadsheet that exports all modules on save, and removes and re-imports the modules on open. Yes, this could be potentially dangerous for converting existing spreadsheets.

This allows me to edit the macros in the modules via Emacs (yes, emacs) or natively in Excel, and commit my BZR repository after major changes. Because all the modules are text files, the standard diff-style commands in BZR work for my sources except the Excel file itself.

I've setup a directory for my BZR repository, X:\Data\MySheet. In the repo are MySheet.xls and one .vba file for each of my modules (ie: Module1Macros). In my spreadsheet I've added one module that is exempt from the export/import cycle called "VersionControl". Each module to be exported and re-imported must end in "Macros".

Contents of the "VersionControl" module:

Sub SaveCodeModules()

'This code Exports all VBA modules
Dim i%, sName$

With ThisWorkbook.VBProject
    For i% = 1 To .VBComponents.Count
        If .VBComponents(i%).CodeModule.CountOfLines > 0 Then
            sName$ = .VBComponents(i%).CodeModule.Name
            .VBComponents(i%).Export "X:\Tools\MyExcelMacros\" & sName$ & ".vba"
        End If
    Next i
End With

End Sub

Sub ImportCodeModules()

With ThisWorkbook.VBProject
    For i% = 1 To .VBComponents.Count

        ModuleName = .VBComponents(i%).CodeModule.Name

        If ModuleName <> "VersionControl" Then
            If Right(ModuleName, 6) = "Macros" Then
                .VBComponents.Remove .VBComponents(ModuleName)
                .VBComponents.Import "X:\Data\MySheet\" & ModuleName & ".vba"
           End If
        End If
    Next i
End With

End Sub

Next, we have to setup event hooks for open / save to run these macros. In the code viewer, right click on "ThisWorkbook" and select "View Code". You may have to pull down the select box at the top of the code window to change from "(General)" view to "Workbook" view.

Contents of "Workbook" view:

Private Sub Workbook_Open()

ImportCodeModules

End Sub

Private Sub Workbook_BeforeSave(ByVal SaveAsUI As Boolean, Cancel As Boolean)

SaveCodeModules

End Sub

I'll be settling into this workflow over the next few weeks, and I'll post if I have any problems.

Thanks for sharing the VBComponent code!

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1  
When you're re-importing, you can also check the module type. ThisWorkbook.VBProject.VBComponents.Item(i).Type is 1 for a standard module, 2 for a class module, 3 for a userform, and 100 for a document module (either the workbook or a sheet). –  Jon Crowell Aug 10 '12 at 18:29
2  
There's a bug in the import code. Since you're deleted and importing modules, it changes the order of the modules so you're missing a few each time. You need to change the For loop to go backwards through the array. e.g. For i = .VBComponents.Count To 1 Step -1 –  Tmdean Nov 30 '12 at 22:13
    
I can see it may change the order of the macros, why would it lose one? –  Demosthenex Dec 1 '12 at 3:47
    
Say you have modules a, b, and c: first pass of the loop deletes a and recreates it, now the order of modules is b, c, a. Second pass of the loop deletes c and recreates it, now the order is b, a, c. Third pass of the loop deletes c again and recreates it and the loop is finished. It missed b. –  Tmdean Dec 7 '12 at 6:09
1  
This script above is far from perfect. The importCodeModules() sub is buggy and produces duplicate modules. Moreover, you'll need to edit every single workbook to add the open and before_save events. This is unacceptable. After searching the web for a long long time I've finally found something that actually works, (which refers to here). It has code import, export, code formatting and more. The exporting happens automatically on save and no need to edit any existing workbooks. –  easyplanner.cu.cc Oct 12 at 0:38

After searching for ages and trying out many different tools, I've found my answer to the vba version control problem here: http://stackoverflow.com/a/25984759/2780179

It's a simple excel addin for which the code can be found here

There are no duplicate modules after importing. It exports your code automatically, as soon as you save your workbook, without modifying any existing workbooks. It comes together with a vba code formatter.

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Working upon @Demosthenex work, @Tmdean and @Jon Crowell invaluable comments! (+1 them)

I save module files in git\ dir beside workbook location. Change that to Your liking.

This will NOT track changes to Workbook code. So its up to You to synchronize them.

Sub SaveCodeModules()

'This code Exports all VBA modules
Dim i As Integer, name As String

With ThisWorkbook.VBProject
    For i = .VBComponents.count To 1 Step -1
        If .VBComponents(i).Type <> vbext_ct_Document Then
            If .VBComponents(i).CodeModule.CountOfLines > 0 Then
                name = .VBComponents(i).CodeModule.name
                .VBComponents(i).Export Application.ThisWorkbook.Path & "\git\" & name & ".vba"
            End If
        End If
    Next i
End With

End Sub

Sub ImportCodeModules()
Dim i As Integer
Dim ModuleName As String

With ThisWorkbook.VBProject
    For i = .VBComponents.count To 1 Step -1

        ModuleName = .VBComponents(i).CodeModule.name

        If ModuleName <> "VersionControl" Then
            If .VBComponents(i).Type <> vbext_ct_Document Then
                .VBComponents.Remove .VBComponents(ModuleName)
                .VBComponents.Import Application.ThisWorkbook.Path & "\git\" & ModuleName & ".vba"
            End If
        End If
    Next i
End With

End Sub

And then in Workbook module:

Private Sub Workbook_Open()

ImportCodeModules

End Sub

Private Sub Workbook_BeforeSave(ByVal SaveAsUI As Boolean, Cancel As Boolean)

SaveCodeModules

End Sub
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I have been looking into this too. It apears that the latest Team Foundation Server 2010 may have an Excel Add-In.

Here is a clue:

http://team-foundation-server.blogspot.com/2009/07/tf84037-there-was-problem-initializing.html

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TFS makes heavy use of Excel in it work item reporting, this is not related to getting Excel files into source control unfortunately. –  Brad R Apr 14 '11 at 4:19

One thing you could do is to have the following snippet in your Workbook:

Sub SaveCodeModules()

'This code Exports all VBA modules
Dim i%, sName$

    With ThisWorkbook.VBProject
        For i% = 1 To .VBComponents.Count
            If .VBComponents(i%).CodeModule.CountOfLines > 0 Then
                sName$ = .VBComponents(i%).CodeModule.Name
                .VBComponents(i%).Export "C:\Code\" & sName$ & ".vba"
            End If
        Next i
    End With
End Sub

I found this snippet on the Internet.

Afterwards, you could use Subversion to maintain version control. For example by using the command line interface of Subversion with the 'shell' command within VBA. That would do it. I'm even thinking of doing this myself :)

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I think this is an excellent approach. Source control of Excel code can only happen with decomposition. This would infer a build approach also. Code Cleaner can do this for instance (freeware I believe) appspro.com/Utilities/CodeCleaner.htm but equally your code is equivalent. –  polyglot Oct 3 '09 at 12:44
    
I tried to modify this to work using Microsoft® Excel® for Mac 2011 Version 14.4.1. The line that calls the Export method quietly does nothing (regardless of the well-formed OS X directories I used). –  505 May 21 at 3:12

You might have tried using Microsoft's Excel XML in zip container (.xlsx and .xslm) for version control and found the vba was stored in vbaProject.bin (which is useless for version control).

The solution is simple.

  1. Open the excel file with LibreOffice Calc
  2. In LibreOffice Calc
    1. File
    2. Save as
    3. Save as type: ODF Spreadsheet (.ods)
  3. Close LibreOffice Calc
  4. rename the new file's file extension from .ods to .zip
  5. create a folder for the spreadsheet in a GIT maintained area
  6. extract the zip into it's GIT folder
  7. commit to GIT

When you repeat this with the next version of the spreadsheet you'll have to make sure you make the folder's files exactly match those in the zip container (and don't leave any deleted files behind).

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2  
This approach is fraught with risk though. If you subsequently use a feature in Excel which is either not implemented in Libre or which doesn't "map" to Libre and back correctly, this approach will break. This will work, I'm sure, for simple spreadsheets, but extreme care must be taken. PW –  Phil Whittington Mar 21 '13 at 14:44

I wrote a revision controlled spreadsheet using VBA. It is geared more for engineering reports where you have multiple people working on a Bill Of Material or Schedule and then at some point in time you want to create a snapshot revision that shows adds, del and updates from the previous rev.

Note: it is a macro enabled workbook that you need to sign in to download from my site (you can use OpenID)

All the code is unlocked.

Rev Controlled Spreadsheet

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There is also a program called Beyond Compare that has a quite nice Excel file compare. I found a screenshot in chinese that briefly shows this: link

There is a 30 day trial on their page

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You should try DiffEngineX. It can be called programmatically and also from the command line taking command line arguments. It not only compares the Excel spreadsheets cells, but also the Visual Basic macros embedded in the workbooks. Also compares Excel defined names and comments, which a lot of freeware tools miss out. It can be downloaded from

http://www.florencesoft.com/excel-differences-download.html

I'm sure your version control system has an option or box so you can automatically call DiffEngineX with your original and modified Excel workbooks.

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9  
You should mention in your answer that you're affiliated with this commercial product. –  ho1 Jan 4 '12 at 14:38

TortoiseSVN is an astonishingly good Windows client for the Subversion version control system. One feature which I just discovered that it has is that when you click to get a diff between versions of an Excel file, it will open both versions in Excel and highlight (in red) the cells that were changed. This is done through the magic of a vbs script, described here.

You may find this useful even if NOT using TortoiseSVN.

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1  
So amazing to know TortoiseSVN can compare as an built-in feature ^^ –  Nam G VU Jul 5 '12 at 5:44
2  
Is this the same thing with Word file? –  Nam G VU Jul 5 '12 at 5:48
2  
I've just tested - this also available to Word file. Cool ^^ –  Nam G VU Jul 5 '12 at 5:53
    
amazing it is working great –  Ranjit Kumar Nov 20 '12 at 6:33

in response to mattlant's reply - sharepoint will work well as a version control only if the version control feature is turned on in the document library. in addition be aware that any code that calls other files by relative paths wont work. and finally any links to external files will break when a file is saved in sharepoint.

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I'm not aware of a tool that does this well but I've seen a variety of homegrown solutions. The common thread of these is to minimise the binary data under version control and maximise textual data to leverage the power of conventional scc systems. To do this:

  • Treat the workbook like any other application. Seperate logic, config and data.
  • Separate code from the workbook.
  • Build the UI programmatically.
  • Write a build script to reconstruct the workbook.
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Why go through all of this nonsense when all you need is a source control that handles binary objects? SVN can do this. –  Jim Beam Feb 14 at 0:03
    
Because you can't merge binary objects –  igelineau May 14 at 13:47

If you are looking at an office setting with regular office non technical users than Sharepoint is a viable alternative. You can setup document folders with version control enabled and checkins and checkouts. Makes it freindlier for regular office users.

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It should work with most VCS (depending on other criteria you might choose SVN, CVS, Darcs, TFS, etc), however it will actually the complete file (because it is a binary format), meaning that the "what changed" question is not so easy to answer.

You can still rely on log messages if people complete them, but you might also try the new XML based formats from Office 2007 to gain some more visibility (although it would still be hard to weed through the tons of XML, plus AFAIK the XML file is zipped on the disk, so you would need a pre-commit hook to unzip it for text diff to work correctly).

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It depends on what level of integration you want, I've used Subversion/TortoiseSVN which seems fine for simple usage. I have also added in keywords but there seems to be a risk of file corruption. There's an option in Subversion to make the keyword substitutions fixed length and as far as I understand it will work if the fixed length is even but not odd. In any case you don't get any useful sort of diff functionality, I think there are commercial products that will do 'diff'. I did find something that did diff based on converting stuff to plain text and comparing that, but it wasn't very nice.

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It depends whether you are talking about data, or the code contained within a spreadsheet. While I have a strong dislike of Microsoft's Visual Sourcesafe and normally would not recommended it, it does integrate easily with both Access and Excel, and provides source control of modules.

[In fact the integration with Access, includes queries, reports and modules as individual objects that can be versioned]

The MSDN link is here.

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3  
One of the better kept secrets - I didn't know VSS could do that. +1 –  ConcernedOfTunbridgeWells Sep 25 '08 at 8:00
    
Yeah, it is. I've used it successfuly from within Access. Worked great. –  Mitch Wheat Sep 25 '08 at 8:06
    
I didn't know that neither. But anyway, VSS is one pile of s..t and I would stay away from it. –  GUI Junkie Sep 25 '08 at 8:18
    
I got all excited and spent an hour scouring the net for this, but it seems that MS stopped supporting it in Excel 2003. You might be in luck if it's Access VBA you're working with, but I didn't look. –  harvest316 May 31 '11 at 2:27
1  
you might be able to use the Office developer edition add-in?: brandon.fuller.name/archives/2003/11/07/10.26.30 –  Mitch Wheat May 31 '11 at 5:24

Use any of the standard version control tools like SVN or CVS. Limitations would depend on whats the objective. Apart from a small increase in size of the repository, i did'nt face any issues

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