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I worked on a UnitOfWork / Repository / MVC application. Now that this is working all great, I want to decouple the UnitOfWork from the controllers. One way of doing it is to inject the dependency with Ninject (or other) in the controller's contructor. However, this means the UnitOfWork will be instanciated at the same time as the controller.

The way I want to use my UnitOfWork is with Using blocks like so:

using(var unitOfWork = new IUnitOfWork)
{
    return unitOfWork.GetRepository<IEmployeesRepository>().GetAllEmployees();
}

Obviously you cant instance a interface, you have instance an implementation which is injected with a dependency injector, but how can I inject it in a using clause?

I saw Property injection and Method injection but I am unsure of how I could use those to acheive my goal.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use a factory which you register in the container:

public class UserController : Controller
{
    IUnitOfWorkFactory _factory;

    public UserController(IUnitOfWorkFactory factory)
    {
        _factory = factory;
    }

    public ActionResult DoSomething()
    {
        using(var unitOfWork = _factory.Create())
        {
            return unitOfWork.GetRepository<IEmployeesRepository>().GetAllEmployees();
        }
    }
}

imho it's better to abstract away the UoW handling: http://blog.gauffin.org/2012/06/how-to-handle-transactions-in-asp-net-mvc3/

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1  
+1 This is a good approach. @Pluc If you're actually going to use this approach with Ninject, be sure to check out Ninject.Extensions.Factory, which auto-gens an equivalent of the above –  Ruben Bartelink Oct 31 '12 at 23:26
    
You are right, abstracting the UoW handling feels a lot less antipattern. Thanks. @RubenBartelink Thanks for the extension information but I don't feel like it is justified since writing my factory manually is litterally ~5 lines of code. –  Pluc Nov 5 '12 at 18:47
    
@Pluc As always, it depends - on how many cases you have and many other concerns –  Ruben Bartelink Nov 7 '12 at 0:19
    
Yes, of course. And in my case, I decided it wasn't worth an extra plugin. That's why I thanked you but did not use it. :) Hell, I'll even voteup your comment! :) –  Pluc Nov 7 '12 at 12:02

You don't have to instantiate the variable in the using block, you can use an existing variable. So, you can use method injection like this:

public ActionResult Index(IUnitOfWork unit)
{
    using(unit)
    {
         // Do some work....
    }

    // Return an action
}

Just understand that unit will be disposed after leaving the using block, so it should not be used.

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1  
I don't really like the idea to start adding the UnitOfWork as a method parameter everywhere though... I'd like to keep the dependency injection as discrete as possible –  Pluc Oct 31 '12 at 15:10

[..] how can I inject it in a using clause?

There will no longer be a using clause. If the IoC container injects the dependency, it is responsible for it's lifetime.

It's not a good practice that you dispose the dependency (and using does exactly that).


I saw Property injection and Method injection

Always use Constructor Injection when possible. Property/Method Injection have their uses in used in a few special cases.

The good things about Constructor Injection is that a class makes it clear right away what are its dependencies. Also, you can only create an instance once all needed dependencies are provided.

With Property Injection you may forget to set a needed dependency. Use this only in case a dependency is optional, or it has a default implementation, or to break circular dependency graphs.

With method injection you may end up bloating your code with the same method parameter again and again.


[...] what happens if I want to using UnitOfWork twice in the same instance of that controller. Will Ninject inject it again?

Ninject will inject the same instance twice, or will create two different instances, depending on how you instruct it to behave.

IoC containers allow you to specify/configure lifetime styles for the injected components. For Ninject, see how to specify Object Scopes.

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I thought the best practice with dbContext was to instance right before you need it, and dispose it right after. That's why I made my UnitOfWork disposable so that it would (somewhat) work as a wrapper for the context. When you instance it, the dbContext is created, then when you dispose it, it Commits and disposes the dbContext. Should the UnitOfWork manage the lifetime of the DbContext then? Create the dbContext only when requested, and dispose after a Commit? Or should I just let it be and the dbContext will get handled as the controller gets disposed? –  Pluc Oct 31 '12 at 15:22
    
Also, is it bad practice to add this in my BaseController (that all my controllers extends) instead of using the constructor? [Inject] protected IUnitOfWork unitOfWork { get; set; } I can still do my mocking by creating my Controller like this new EmployeeController { unitOfWork = new MockUnitOfWork(); } and it saves me from writing a contructor in each of my controllers. –  Pluc Oct 31 '12 at 15:33
    
@Pluc It's OK to let the UnitOfWork commit the DbContext; just make sure this happens. –  w0lf Oct 31 '12 at 15:39
    
@Pluc the idea of a Base Controller that controls this is not a bad one. I've also seen this in use here (although this usees RavenDB instead of SQL, the principles are the same) –  w0lf Oct 31 '12 at 15:41

You can easily do that by means of Autofac. I'm sure other IoC containers should have same feature.

Here's link to wiki.

Example of code:

public class UserController : Controller
{
    Func<Owned<IUnitOfWork>> unitOfWorkFactory;

    public UserController(Func<Owned<IUnitOfWork>> unitOfWorkFactory)
    {
        this.unitOfWorkFactory = unitOfWorkFactory;
    }

    public ActionResult DoSomething()
    {
        using(var unitOfWork = this.unitOfWorkFactory().Value)
        {
            return unitOfWork.GetRepository<IEmployeesRepository>().GetAllEmployees();
        }
    }
}

No additional registration needed, just register implementation of your interface.

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