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A int is composed of 4 bytes. How could I replace one of those 4 bytes with a new byte. In other words I am looking for a method:

int ReplaceByte(int index, int value, byte replaceByte)
{
     // implementation
}

for example if I have the value FFFFFFFF (-1) and I will like to replace the byte 0 with 0A (10) then I will call the method as:

ReplaceByte(0,-1,10)

and I will like that method to return me FFFFFF0A

Do I have to convert the int to a byte array then replace the byte I want then convert back to an int? I am looking for an efficient way of doing this. We are creating a debugger like program that connects to a target (board) and we update these values very frequently.

Edit (results)

Thanks to your answers I compared the methods:

here are the results:

enter image description here

Note my implementation was the slowest!

Here is the code:

    static void Main ( string[ ] args )
    {
        byte[ ] randomBytes = new byte[ 1024 * 1024 * 512 ]; 

        Random r = new Random( );
        r.NextBytes( randomBytes );

        Int64 sum;
        var now = DateTime.Now;

        Console.WriteLine( "Test 1" );
        sum = 0;
        now = DateTime.Now;
        foreach ( var bt in randomBytes )
        {
            sum += ReplaceByte1( 1 , -1 , bt );
        }

        Console.WriteLine( "Test 1 finished in {0} seconds \t hash = {1} \n" , ( DateTime.Now - now ).TotalSeconds, sum );

        Console.WriteLine( "Test 2" );
        sum = 0;
        now = DateTime.Now;
        foreach ( var bt in randomBytes )
        {
            sum += ReplaceByte2( 1 , -1 , bt );
        }

        Console.WriteLine( "Test 2 finished in {0} seconds \t hash = {1} \n" , ( DateTime.Now - now ).TotalSeconds,  sum );


        Console.WriteLine( "Test 3" );
        sum = 0;
        now = DateTime.Now;
        foreach ( var bt in randomBytes )
        {
            sum += ReplaceByte3( 1 , -1 , bt );
        }

        Console.WriteLine( "Test 3 finished in {0} seconds \t hash = {1} \n" , ( DateTime.Now - now ).TotalSeconds , sum );

        Console.Read( );            
    }

    // test 1
    static int ReplaceByte1 ( int index , int value , byte replaceByte )
    {
        return ( value & ~( 0xFF << ( index * 8 ) ) ) | ( replaceByte << ( index * 8 ) );
    }

    // test 2
    static int ReplaceByte2 ( int index , int value , byte replaceByte )
    {
        // how many bits you should shift replaceByte to bring it "in position"
        var shiftBits = 8 * index;

        // bitwise AND this with value to clear the bits that should become replaceByte
        var mask = ~( 0xff << shiftBits );

        // clear those bits and then set them to whatever replaceByte is
        return value & mask | ( replaceByte << shiftBits );
    }

    // test 3
    static int ReplaceByte3 ( int index , int value , byte replaceByte )
    {
        var bytes = BitConverter.GetBytes( value );
        bytes[ index ] = replaceByte;

        return BitConverter.ToInt32( bytes , 0 );
    }
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Odd, I didn't expect that much difference in performance between my and Jon's code. Could you try using the Stopwatch class and using the methods at least once before entering the timed loop, and instead of using a huge array loop multiple times over the same array? –  harold Oct 31 '12 at 16:06
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2 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

No, no bytes arrays. This actually very simple.

Not tested:

int ReplaceByte(int index, int value, byte replaceByte)
{
    return (value & ~(0xFF << (index * 8))) | (replaceByte << (index * 8));
}

First it clears the space where at the specified index, and then it puts the new value in that space.

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You can simply use some bitwise arithmetic:

// how many bits you should shift replaceByte to bring it "in position"
var shiftBits = 8 * index;

// bitwise AND this with value to clear the bits that should become replaceByte
var mask = ~(0xff << shiftBits);

// clear those bits and then set them to whatever replaceByte is
return value & mask | (replaceByte << shiftBits);
share|improve this answer
1  
Ok, but why var instead of int? It's not even saving any letters. –  harold Oct 31 '12 at 15:25
2  
@harold: Just habit. I almost never declare concrete types by name nowadays. –  Jon Oct 31 '12 at 15:26
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