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I have a MyUserControl with the following Xaml:

<TextBox Text="{Binding InputValueProperty}" />

In the MyUserControl.xaml.cs I have:

public string InputValue
{
    get { return (string)GetValue(InputValueProperty); }
    set { SetValue(InputValueProperty, value); }
}
public static readonly DependencyProperty InputValueProperty = 
    DependencyProperty.Register("InputValueProperty", typeof(string), 
    typeof(MyUserControl));

In my MainWindow.xaml I create a user control:

<local:MyUserControl InputValue="My Input" />

Later on in my MainWindow.xaml.cs I am trying to access this string. All instances of MyUserControl are contained in a List and I access them with a foreach.

string temp = userControl.InputValue;

This is always null. In my MainWindow.xaml I can see the "My Input" in the text box of the user control but I can't ever seem to get it out of there.

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I think you need to change DependencyProperty.Register("InputValueProperty", typeof(string), typeof(MyUserControl)); to DependencyProperty.Register("InputValue", typeof(string), typeof(MyUserControl)); –  MrEdge Oct 31 '12 at 16:05
    
Yeah. Sorry. That was a typo. That is set Correctly. –  B-Rad Oct 31 '12 at 16:20
    
Where are you iterating over the userControls? in the constructor of MainWindow?...show us that code...and where. You need to wait till the MainWindow is Loaded (maybe after the UserControl is Loaded too). Also, show us how are you populating this "list" with your MyUserControl(s). –  colinsmith Oct 31 '12 at 16:32
    
What is null, the usercontrol or the InputValue property? –  MrEdge Nov 1 '12 at 11:43
    
The InputValue property is null. If you default the property to something it is always that default. It is never changing. –  B-Rad Nov 7 '12 at 18:35
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3 Answers

up vote -1 down vote accepted

You need to implement INotifyPropertyChanged on your class that has the property

    public class YourClassThatHasTheInputValuePropertyInIt: INotifyPropertyChanged
    {
            public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged;
            private void NotifyPropertyChanged(String propertyName)
            {
                if (PropertyChanged != null)
                    PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs(propertyName));
            }

            public string InputValue
            {
                get { return (string)GetValue(InputValueProperty); }
                set { SetValue(InputValueProperty, value);
                      NotifyPropertyChanged("InputValue"); }
     }
    }

This will allow the binding to pick up the property

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This has nothing to do with INotifyPropertyChanged. He is talking about binding involving only dependency properties and constant values. –  MrDosu Oct 31 '12 at 16:15
    
I tried this just in case. It didn't work. –  B-Rad Oct 31 '12 at 16:27
    
INotifyPropertyChanged is merely an alternative to DependencyObject (which is his approach). It is not a requirement. –  Bill Tarbell Oct 31 '12 at 19:33
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DependencyProperty.Register("InputValueProperty", ...

That should be:

DependencyProperty.Register("InputValue", ...

XAML depends on the registered name of the property, not the name of the property accessor.

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if unsure how to implement the dependency property the visual studio snippet (type propdp then press tab twice) is always safe and fast. –  MrDosu Oct 31 '12 at 16:17
    
Yeah. I had this set correctly. I typed it wrong when inputting the questions. –  B-Rad Oct 31 '12 at 16:27
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It looks like the problem is in your binding. Here's a working example that's modeled off your code with a relative source binding:

Here's the user control:

  public partial class MyUserControl : UserControl
  {
    public MyUserControl()
    {
      InitializeComponent();
    }

    public string InputValue
    {
      get { return (string)GetValue(InputValueProperty); }
      set { SetValue(InputValueProperty, value); }
    }
    public static readonly DependencyProperty InputValueProperty =
        DependencyProperty.Register("InputValueProperty", typeof(string),
        typeof(MyUserControl));
  }
<UserControl x:Class="WpfApplication4.MyUserControl"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml" xmlns:local="clr-namespace:WpfApplication4" Height="30" Width="300">
    <Grid>
       <TextBox Text="{Binding Path=InputValue, RelativeSource={RelativeSource Mode=FindAncestor, AncestorType={x:Type local:MyUserControl}}}" />
    </Grid>
</UserControl>

And here's the window:

  public partial class Window1 : Window
  {
    public Window1()
    {
      InitializeComponent();
    }

    private void Button_Click(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
      string text1 = ctrl1.InputValue;
      string text2 = ctrl2.InputValue;
      string text3 = ctrl3.InputValue;
//breakpoint here
    }
  }

<Window x:Class="WpfApplication4.Window1"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml" xmlns:local="clr-namespace:WpfApplication4" Title="Window1" Height="300" Width="300">
    <Grid>
    <StackPanel>
      <local:MyUserControl x:Name="ctrl1" InputValue="My Input" />
      <local:MyUserControl x:Name="ctrl2" InputValue="2" />
      <local:MyUserControl x:Name="ctrl3" InputValue="3" />
      <Button Click="Button_Click" Height="25" Content="debug"/>
      </StackPanel>
    </Grid>
</Window>

If i throw a breakpoint in the click event i can see the bound values of each of the controls. (if you copy and paste from this be sure to change WpfApplication4 to whatever your project is called.

share|improve this answer
    
"Default Text" shows up. –  B-Rad Nov 7 '12 at 18:36
    
Thanks for the reply. I took a closer look and think i know what's wrong. I'll edit my answer. Please look it over and accept if it works out for you. –  Bill Tarbell Nov 7 '12 at 22:45
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