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I have three separate file parsing functions that convert text files to objects and then insert those values back into an sqlite database. They are all basically identical except for the object classes.

The process goes as follows:

  1. Download a file using http
  2. Count the lines in the file for a progress calculation
  3. Delete all of the previous records in the target table
  4. Open the file with a BufferedReader
  5. Read 2000 lines at a time and convert them to objects
  6. Insert 2000 records into sqlite in a transaction
  7. Loop until done

I cannot figure out how to make this code generic to allow any class to be used for creating the objects and then deciding which DAL function to use to persist the data. Java isn't my first language so any guidance would be great.

Here is the code I am using:

public void downloadPendingPoleInspections() {

    int count;
    String filePath;
    Inspections inspections = Inspections.getInstance();

    filePath = Environment.getExternalStorageDirectory() + File.separator + "inspections.txt";

    try {

        downloadFile("http://localhost/api/inspectionservices.aspx?o=retrieve", "pendinginspections.txt", POST_PENDING_INSPECTIONS_PROGRESS_UPDATE);

        int totalInspections = getLineCount(filePath);

        inspections.deleteAllPendingInspections();          

        File file = new File(filePath);
        BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new FileReader(file));
        String line;

        int i = 0;
        int j = 0;

        List<PendingInspection> batch = new ArrayList<PendingInspection>();

        while ((line = br.readLine()) != null) {
            String[] values = line.split(" ");

            PendingInspection pending = new PendingInspection(
                    Integer.parseInt(values[0]), values[1],
                    Double.parseDouble(values[2]),
                    Double.parseDouble(values[3]));

            batch.add(pending);
            i++;
            j++;

            if (i >= 2000) {

                inspections.pendingInspectionsBatchInsert(batch);                   
                batch.clear();
                i = 0;                  
            }
        }

        if (i > 0) {
            inspections.pendingInspectionsBatchInsert(batch);
            batch.clear();
        }

        br.close();
        file.delete();

    } catch (Exception e) {
        Log.e("SyncActivity", e.toString());            
    }       
}

edit: Here are the interface and class declarations

public interface Inspectable {
    public int getId();
    public void setId(int id);

    public String getLabel();
    public void setLabel(String label);

    public double getX();
    public void setX(double x);

    public double getY();
    public void setY(double y);
}

public class RWInspection {
private String id;
private double x;
private double y;
private String inspector;
private String comments;
private String timestamp;


public RWInspection(String id, double x, double y, String inspector, String comments, String timestamp) {
        this.id = id;       
        this.x = x;
        this.y = y;
        this.inspector = inspector;
        this.comments = comments;
        this.timestamp = timestamp;
}

snip.... getter and setter implementations

public class PInspection implements Inspectable{
    private int id;
    private String number;
    private double x;
    private double y;

public PInspection(int id, String poleNumber, double x, double y) {
    this.id = id;
    this.number = number ;
    this.x = x;
    this.y = y;
}
share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'd split this into an abstract base class and some implementations. The base class might look like this:

public abstract class Downloader {
    protected abstract void processLine(String[] line);
    protected abstract void save();
    protected abstract String file();
public void downloadPendingPoleInspections() {

    int count;
    String filePath;

    filePath = Environment.getExternalStorageDirectory() + File.separator + file();

    try {

        downloadFile("http://localhost/api/inspectionservices.aspx?o=retrieve", "pending" + file(), POST_PENDING_INSPECTIONS_PROGRESS_UPDATE);

        int totalInspections = getLineCount(filePath);

        File file = new File(filePath);
        BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new FileReader(file));
        String line;

        int i = 0;
        int j = 0;


        while ((line = br.readLine()) != null) {
            processLine(line.split(" "));
            i++;
            j++;

            if (i >= 2000) {
                save()
                i = 0;                  
            }
        }

        if (i > 0) {
            save()
        }

        br.close();
        file.delete();

    } catch (Exception e) {
        Log.e("SyncActivity", e.toString());            
    }       
}

For each type you want to handle you create a small implentation like this:

public class InspectionDownloader extends DownLoader {
    Inspections inspections = Inspections.getInstance();
    List<PendingInspection> batch = new ArrayList<PendingInspection>();

    public InspectionDownloader() {
        inspections.deleteAllPendingInspections();
    }

    protected void processLine(String[] values) {
        PendingInspection pending = new PendingInspection(
            Integer.parseInt(values[0]), values[1],
            Double.parseDouble(values[2]),
            Double.parseDouble(values[3]));
        batch.add(pending);
    }

    protected void save() {
        inspections.pendingInspectionsBatchInsert(batch);
        batch.clear();
    }
    protected String file() { 
        return "inspections.txt";
    }
}

This way one can concentrate the reuseable logic in a base class and move the special logic over to small and focused specialized classes. This pattern is called templated method. You can see the derived class is very focused on the operations special to the type it's responible for.

share|improve this answer
    
So you would then call this simply as: InspectionDownloader d = new InspectionDownloader(); and the base class downloadPendingPoleInspections method would take care of doing the actual work? – eptiliom Oct 31 '12 at 18:11
    
I am going with this answer, thank you. – eptiliom Oct 31 '12 at 18:53

They are all basically identical except for the object classes.

Sounds like you want to have a common interface for all of these objects that are created as part of the batch process. I recommend something as follows:

public interface Batchable  {  void doBatch();  }

Then do the following:

public class Foo implements Batchable  {}  
public class Bar implements Batchable {}

You can now have each class implement its own function body for doBatch and you have at least partially abstracted away the need to know the class. Now in terms of persisting 2000 records at a time, why not push them all at once in a large transaction. You are risking data integrity losses by not doing this.

share|improve this answer
    
The classes already implement a common interface, but that doesn't really answer the problem since each class has a different number of attributes to parse from the file. The 2000 record batch is done because this is running on an android tablet and I can have over 100k records to import and I need to show progress due to a long potential commit time. – eptiliom Oct 31 '12 at 16:55
    
What is the structure of the data / classes? Please add this to your original post – Woot4Moo Oct 31 '12 at 17:16
    
@eptiliom further doing 2000 at a time doesn't buy you anything. – Woot4Moo Oct 31 '12 at 17:16
    
Maybe it would be better served by another question, but how else would you show progress when committing a large number of records, except by breaking it up into smaller pieces and reporting when those are done? – eptiliom Oct 31 '12 at 18:05
    
@eptiliom Well thing of it this way. You know the size of the array you are processing. You just need a function that polls at "random" intervals and returns the current percentage that has been iterated over. Quick and dirty way is to keep track of the current index and have your function return (double)index/arraySize – Woot4Moo Oct 31 '12 at 18:20

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