Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Recently I asked the question: Replace byte in a int

and that shows how to replace a byte on an integer. I need to do the same thing with Int64 too. Apparently I am to bad at this lol. I do not know why replacing int to Int64 does not make it work. In other words I modified the solutions on the last question to:

static Int64 ReplaceByte1( int index , Int64 value , byte replaceByte )
{
    return ( value & ~( 0xFF << ( index * 8 ) ) ) | ( replaceByte << ( index * 8 ) );
}

static Int64 ReplaceByte2( int index , Int64 value , byte replaceByte )
{
    // how many bits you should shift replaceByte to bring it "in position"
    var shiftBits = 8 * index;

    // bitwise AND this with value to clear the bits that should become replaceByte
    Int64 mask = ~( 0xff << shiftBits );

    // clear those bits and then set them to whatever replaceByte is
    return value & mask | ( replaceByte << shiftBits );
}

that does not work when using large values. For example calling the method as:

        // returns 12345678848  where it should return 3755744309
        var test1 = ReplaceByte1( 4 , 12345678901 , 0 );

        // returns 12345678848  where it should return 3755744309
        var test2 = ReplaceByte2( 4 , 12345678901 , 0 );

how can I make it work with Int64 too? what am I doing wrong? The only method that works is the last one the slowest one.

Edit

I already made the replacements and I still get different results. Why? take a look:

    // method that words
    static Int64 SlowReplace ( int index , Int64 value , byte replaceByte )
    {
        var bytes = BitConverter.GetBytes( value );
        bytes[ index ] = replaceByte;

        return BitConverter.ToInt64( bytes , 0 );
    }

    static Int64 ReplaceByte1 ( int index , Int64 value , byte replaceByte )
    {
        return ( value & ~( (long)0xFF << ( index * 8 ) ) ) | ( replaceByte << ( index * 8 ) );
    }

    static Int64 ReplaceByte2 ( int index , Int64 value , byte replaceByte )
    {
        // how many bits you should shift replaceByte to bring it "in position"
        var shiftBits = 8 * index;

        // bitwise AND this with value to clear the bits that should become replaceByte
        Int64 mask = ~( ( Int64 )0xff << shiftBits );

        // clear those bits and then set them to whatever replaceByte is
        return value & mask | ( replaceByte << shiftBits );
    }        

    static void Main ( string[ ] args )
    {
        var a = SlowReplace( 4 , 12345678901 , 255 ); //  1098972404789 corect
        var b = ReplaceByte1( 4 , 12345678901 , 255 ); // 3755744511 incorrect
        var c = ReplaceByte2( 4 , 12345678901 , 255 ); // 3755744511 incorrect            

        Console.Read( );            
    }
share|improve this question
    
Convert to byte array. Modify index. Convert array to long. System.BitConverter will help –  Cole Johnson Oct 31 '12 at 16:31
    
Yeah I know I have that solution on the link stackoverflow.com/questions/13161285/replace-byte-in-a-int But note how slow it is compared to the other approaches on the results. –  Tono Nam Oct 31 '12 at 16:32

3 Answers 3

The problem now relies in the replaceByte << shiftBits expression. Refer to the << Operator documentation.

The documentation states that if the first operand is a 32-bit quantity (which in this case it is, because an implicit cast is performed on the byte variable), the shift count is given by the low-order five bits of the second operand. In this case, because shiftBits equals 32 = 2^5, which in binary representation is 100000, the low-order five bits are 00000.

Aside from an explicit cast ((long)0xFF) you can also suffix constants with an l or an L to mark them as long / Int64 (or ul / UL for ulong / UInt64), but 0xFFL can be considered less aesthetic/readable by some. For the replaceByte << shiftBits situation an explicit cast is required.

share|improve this answer

You need to cast the constant 0xff to long:

Int64 mask = ~( (Int64)0xff << shiftBits );

If you don't do this and index is greater than 3 then mask will have the wrong value because the literal 0xff is an int and there is also this rule:

If the first operand is an int or uint (32-bit quantity), the shift count is given by the low-order five bits of the second operand. That is, the actual shift count is 0 to 31 bits.

Since in this case the shift count is a power of two and greater than 31 its low-order five bits will all be zero, which will result in no shift at all (as if shiftBits == 0). So mask will have the wrong value and it will clear the wrong bits out of value, producing a wrong result.

share|improve this answer

Replace 0xFF << ( index * 8 ) with (long)0xFF << ( index * 8 )

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.