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I've been using Emacs for a couple of weeks now. "As of right now (23 June 2008), a checkout of GNU Emacs has 1,112,341 lines of Lisp as well as 346,822 lines of C." I know Emacs does a lot of things and is a vast project. How much of the emacs code is just text editing? What is in mainly in those 1.5 million LOC?? By comparison jEdit jumped up to 150k LOC after a stable release, growing to almost 500k. I'm sort of playing around with the idea of programming my own text editor from scratch, more as a fun project.

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closed as off topic by ataylor, user4815162342, kapa, Kay, Thomas Matthews Oct 31 '12 at 20:59

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Did you look through to see what is there? I guess that includes a lot of packages, which implement things like web browsers, newsreaders, and email packages. –  Marcin Oct 31 '12 at 19:21
    
On Emacs size. –  Boris Stitnicky Oct 31 '12 at 19:34

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My answer is not a perfect or technical one, but it represents one point of view. Emacs has a secret: It is an operating system. Emacs is an avatar of MIT Lisp machine, a superior system with an uber keybord. Lisp machine got cancelled just as most computer projects got cancelled as the banksters who have state permission to print money as they want decided, that it was their time to make their footprint on the microcomputer technology. Many superior architectures and operating systems became extinct in favor of Wintel. Market had to accept it, because where money is printed without work, there is no market. Just a few academics including Stallman knew not to accept inferior technology. Actually, Stallman and Symbolics who was making Lisp machines had had their share of infighting, and Emacs is not a direct offspring of Lisp machines, but today, it remains the only reasonable Lisp-based operating system. (Assuming that you understand that Lisp is the most powerful language so far.) The first two things you should do when you start with Emacs is to make yourself familiar with the terminology of Space cadet modifier keys and redefine your CapsLock (assuming you use standard 104 key PC keyboard) to act as Control key, otherwise it will be too uncomfortable for you to press the ubiquitous Emacs Ctrl combos. After you redefine it, and make Win key into Meta key, by miracle, you will be transported to the past world of Apollo landings and Lisp machines, and Emacs will become comfortable to use. And as Yukihiro Matsumoto said, once you really taste Emacs, you don't want anything else.

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-1 Please explain how emacs is an operating system? It is not even multi-threaded. –  Marcin Oct 31 '12 at 19:20
    
+1 for the Matz link. but yeah, if I can reconfigure emacs, I can fork the code and write my own? Which is kind of the same thing. –  RParadox Oct 31 '12 at 19:27
    
@Marcin: +1 For admitting yourself. Here we are getting on the border of theology. I will argue that OS can be built not only without this and that, but also without computers, eg. using paper notes and files. Many organizations in pre-computer era worked that way. But Wikipedia would say 'no, OS without computers is impossible'. So I have no way to explain what you ask unless we agree on what is an OS. Nevertheless, some say that it is even diminishing Emacs to call it only an OS. –  Boris Stitnicky Oct 31 '12 at 19:31
    
@RParadox: If you look at his slides, Matz kinda did that. When he first encountered Emacs, he wasn't allowed to run it, he could only browse its code :)))) –  Boris Stitnicky Oct 31 '12 at 19:39

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