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I am curious why PL/SQL does not let me declare a var as datetime and what my alternatives are. I am using Oracle 11.

VARIABLE some_date date;

And I get the following error message indicating legal types for a var, date not being included:

 Usage: VAR[IABLE] [ <variable> [ NUMBER | CHAR | CHAR
(n [CHAR|BYTE]) |
VARCHAR2 (n [CHAR|BYTE]) | NCHAR | NCHAR (n) |
NVARCHAR2 (n) | CLOB | NCLOB | REFCURSOR |
BINARY_FLOAT | BINARY_DOUBLE ] ]

I can probably work around this issue by simulating the date as a string or long representation but I'm really curious why this is the case.

Thanks

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2  
VARIABLE is an SQLPlus command‌​, not a PL/SQL one. You can use it as a bind variable in plain SQL as well as in PL/SQL, within SQLPlus (or SQL Developer). It isn't directly anything to do with PL/SQL though. –  Alex Poole Oct 31 '12 at 17:00

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

In PL/SQL, The KeyWord VARIABLE is out of your context. It used to create bind variables Bind variables are created in the environment and not in the declarative section of a PL/SQL block. Variables declared in a PL/SQL block are available only when you execute the block. After the block is executed, the memory used by the variable is freed. However, bind variables are accessible even after the block is executed. Therefore, when created, bind variables can be used and manipulated by multiple subprograms. They can be used in SQL statements and PL/SQL blocks just like any other variable. These variables can be passed as run-time values into or out of PL/SQL subprograms.

eg for VARIABLE:

VARIABLE b_result DATW
BEGIN
  SELECT JOIN_DATE INTO :b_result
  FROM employees WHERE employee_id = 144;
END;
/
PRINT b_result

I feel for you, the blow will serve the purpose

DECLARE
  some_date DATE;
BEGIN
  -- other code
END;
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I guess you mean SQL*Plus instead of PL/SQL, right? You can use a VARCHAR2 and convert in your PL/SQL code between the two using to_char() and to_date().

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1  
no, i meant PL/SQL –  amphibient Oct 31 '12 at 16:51
    
yeah but why don't they allow date?? and they allow other data types that you can use in tables. basically, why are the allowed var data types only a subset of those available in tables? –  amphibient Oct 31 '12 at 16:52

Don't declare the variable with the variable keyword. All that you need is the variable name and the type in the declare block and PL/SQL will take care of the rest.

$DECLARE
$  some_date DATE;
$BEGIN
$  -- other code
$END;
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