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Is there a smart way grab Values from a 2d Array in Pairs and additionally to that the last number in the row?

My Data (saved in a file) look something similar to this:

  0  89  27 100  42  75 8  
  0 100   7  92   5  68 6  
  0  67  49  83 100 100 2  
 35  76  57 100 100  92 5  
 18  68  50  54 100  19 3  

After loading this Data into Matlab I need to group up the Data into Tuples by always taking the Pairs. In this Example it would be:

[0,89],[27,100],[42,75],[0,100],...[100,19]

After the pairing the Data (or meanwhile), I need to add the last Number in the row to the Pairs. The Previous mentioned Data would be altered followingly:

[0,89,8],[27,100,8],[42,75,8],[0,100,6],...[100,19,3]

How would be a smart way to solve this? I personally dislike the extensive use of Loops and think there is a nicer Solution.

share|improve this question
    
The point is, how do you want your tuples stored? –  Acorbe Oct 31 '12 at 16:49
    
Is it important how? In the end, the Triple is needed anyways :-) –  kadir Oct 31 '12 at 19:03

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Edit: This should do the trick.

M=[0  89  27 100  42  75 8  
  0 100   7  92   5  68 6  
  0  67  49  83 100 100 2  
 35  76  57 100 100  92 5  
 18  68  50  54 100  19 3]

X = M(:,1:end-1)
Y = M(:,end)
idxOdd = mod(1:size(X,2),2)==1
Xeven=X(:,~idxOdd)
Xodd=X(:,idxOdd)

Yrep = repmat(Y,1,sum(idxOdd))

[Xodd(:) Xeven(:) Yrep(:)]
share|improve this answer
    
You may want to add a sort –  Dennis Jaheruddin Oct 31 '12 at 17:04
    
I like your approach, its easy to understand, still small enough :-) –  kadir Oct 31 '12 at 21:23

I think it's amazing no-one has come up with this one:

M = [   
  0  89  27 100  42  75 8  
  0 100   7  92   5  68 6  
  0  67  49  83 100 100 2  
 35  76  57 100 100  92 5  
 18  68  50  54 100  19 3  ];


C = arrayfun(...
    @(ii) [M(:,ii:ii+1) M(:,end)], ...
    1:2:size(M,2)-1, 'UniformOuput', false);

You'll end up with this cell array:

>> C{1}

ans =

     0    89     8
     0   100     6
     0    67     2
    35    76     5
    18    68     3

>> C{2}

ans =

    27   100     8
     7    92     6
    49    83     2
    57   100     5
    50    54     3

>> C{3}

ans =

    42    75     8
     5    68     6
   100   100     2
   100    92     5
   100    19     3

Now you can refer to individual tuples like so:

C{1}(2,:)   %  [  0   100   6]
C{3}(4,:)   %  [100    92   5]
share|improve this answer
    
It took a little time to get your solution but its very smart :-) –  kadir Oct 31 '12 at 21:26

This can be done using logical indexing. Building off of Dennis's answer:

z = M(:,end); %# extract the last column
M = M(:,1:end-1); %# chop off the last column from the rest of your data
xidx = logical(mod(1:size(M,2),2)); %# get a logical index of the odd numbered rows
x = M(:,xidx); %# grab the x values
y = M(:,~xidx); %# grab the y values
z = repmat(z,1,numel(x)/numel(z)); % replicate z to match numel of x and y
x = reshape(x',numel(x),1);    %# reshape the arrays to form the right dimensions
y = reshape(y',numel(y),1);
z = reshape(z',numel(z),1);
output = [x,y,z]; %# format output
share|improve this answer

For grouping the data in matrix A, you can use cell2mat and output an array of cell tuples C, then append last column elements in corresponding lines in this array:

% separate the data pairs
C = mat2cell(A(:,1:end-1), ones(1,size(A,1)), 2*ones(1,3));

% single for-loop to append line_lat_element in cells of same row
for i = 1:size(A,1)
    D(i,:) = cellfun(@(x) [x A(i,end)], {C{i,:}}, 'UniformOutput', false);
end

As output, each D{i,j} entry of the cell array will contain the triplet [data1 data2 last_element_of_line].

share|improve this answer

I would like to defend the humble for loop in this case:

M = [  0  89  27 100  42  75 8  ;
         0 100   7  92   5  68 6  ;
         0  67  49  83 100 100 2  ;
        35  76  57 100 100  92 5  ;
        18  68  50  54 100  19 3 ];

out = zeros((size(M,2)-1)/2*size(M,1),3);
ind = 1;
for row = 1:size(M,1)
    for col = 1:2:(size(M,2)-1)
        out(ind,:) = [M(row,col:col+1) M(row,end)];
        ind = ind+1;
    end
end
out

I claim that this is easier to write, understand and maintain than the non-loop versions (either for a programmer new to the code, or the same programmer returning to the code weeks, months, or years later). The only slightly-tricky part is calculating the proper size for the output matrix out. If performance becomes an issue, then sure, look at a non-loop version. But recent versions of MATLAB run for loops much faster than in the past, so why optimize prematurely?

You could eliminate the need to keep a running index by a clever calculation based on row and col, but why bother? The above code is simple and easy for a programmer to understand

share|improve this answer
    
I'll have to disagree with you on this one from a performance standpoint. For large matrices, vectorized vs loops makes a huge difference. Try replicating the test matrix to 100,000x its current size. Using R2012a on a Core-i5 @ 3.1GHz, my solution takes <1/10s to execute. Yours takes 5.5 seconds. –  Doresoom Oct 31 '12 at 18:22
    
I agree 100% that your solution is much faster for large arrays! My point is that your version is also much harder to understand (a subjective opinion, granted!), so why optimize unless you know that you need the extra performance? The OP didn't say that they had a performance problem to solve, they said that they "dislike extensive use of loops", and I just wanted to push back against that. –  Dan Becker Oct 31 '12 at 21:18
    
I will also say that for small arrays I actually found my solution to be faster than yours by 30-40%. Of course the time in both cases was so fast that it would only make a difference if you were doing this calculation many times on many different matrices. But it goes to point out that whether a loop should be replaced with something else will depend on the details of the program and work load under consideration. –  Dan Becker Oct 31 '12 at 21:19
    
Good points all around. I'm just used to working with large matrices on a regular basis, so I rarely look at any factors other than performance. –  Doresoom Nov 1 '12 at 13:58

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