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I am currently writing a small program which takes in text from a simple file, and writes it to another file. The input file is sort of like a "madlibs" kind of deal, with token which I need to place, like "", and "".

Text:

> One of the most <adjective> characters in fiction is named "Tarzan of the <plural-noun>." Tarzan was raised by a/an <noun> and lives in the <adjective> jungle in the heart of darkest <place>.

Code:

import java.io.*;
import java.util.*;

public class Story {

public static void main(String[] args) throws FileNotFoundException {

    Scanner sc = new Scanner(System.in);
    System.out.print("Input file name? ");
    String infileName = sc.next();
    Scanner input = new Scanner(new File(infileName));

    System.out.print("Output file name? ");
    String outfileName = sc.next();
    PrintStream out = new PrintStream(new File(outfileName));

    while (input.hasNext()){

        String current = input.next();
        System.out.println(current);
        int openIndex = current.indexOf("<");
        int closeIndex = current.indexOf(">");
        current = current.substring(openIndex + 1, closeIndex - openIndex);
        System.out.println(current);

        if (current.equals("adjective")){
            System.out.print("Please enter an adjective: ");
            current = sc.next();
            out.print(current);
            out.print(" ");
        } else if (current.equals("plural-noun")){
            System.out.print("Please enter a plural noun: ");
            current = sc.next();
            out.print(current);
            out.print(" ");
        } else if (current.equals("noun")){
            System.out.print("Please enter a noun: ");
            current = sc.next();
            out.print(current);
            out.print(" ");
        } else if (current.equals("place")){
            System.out.print("Please enter a place: ");
            current = sc.next(); 
            out.print(current);
            out.print(" ");
        } else {
            out.print(current);
            out.print(" ");
        }
    }
}
}

This is the problem I seem to be having: Only the words that the user enters, are being printed into the "out1.txt" or whatever, and there are a number of spaces between each word.

Any help is appreciated, thanks guys and girls!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem comes with normal word, i.e. which are not "<variables>":

int openIndex = current.indexOf( "<" );    // returns -1
int closeIndex = current.indexOf( ">" );   // returns -1 too
current = current.substring( openIndex + 1, closeIndex - openIndex );
// at this place for a normal word current is empty

you have to add some "if"

String current = input.next();
int openIndex = current.indexOf( "<" );
if( openIndex > -1 )
{
    int closeIndex = current.indexOf( ">" );
    current = current.substring( openIndex + 1, closeIndex - openIndex );
}
System.out.println( current );

Another problem comes with the token [."] (inside the[]), your code take only the characters inside <> and ." are lost.

String current      = input.next();
String cstStrBefore = "";
String cstStrAfter  = "";
int openIndex = current.indexOf( "<" );
boolean var = ( openIndex > -1 );
if( var )
{
   int closeIndex = current.indexOf( ">" );
   cstStrBefore = current.substring( 0, openIndex );
   cstStrAfter  = current.substring( closeIndex + 1 );
   current      = current.substring( openIndex + 1, closeIndex - openIndex );
}

Here is the whole Java 7 code I use:

import java.io.File;
import java.io.FileNotFoundException;
import java.io.PrintStream;
import java.util.Scanner;

public class Story {
   public static void main( String[] args ) throws FileNotFoundException {
      Scanner     sc    = new Scanner( System.in );
      Scanner     input = new Scanner( new File( "Story.txt" ));
      PrintStream out   = new PrintStream( "Story-out.txt" );
      while( input.hasNext()) {
         String current      = input.next();
         String cstStrBefore = "";
         String cstStrAfter  = "";
         int openIndex = current.indexOf( "<" );
         boolean var = ( openIndex > -1 );
         if( var ) {
            int closeIndex = current.indexOf( ">" );
            cstStrBefore = current.substring( 0, openIndex );
            cstStrAfter  = current.substring( closeIndex + 1 );
            current      =
               current.substring( openIndex + 1, closeIndex - openIndex );
         }
         System.out.println( current );
         switch( current ) {
         case "adjective"  : System.out.print( "Please enter an adjective: " ); break;
         case "plural-noun": System.out.print( "Please enter a plural noun: " ); break;
         case "noun"       : System.out.print( "Please enter a noun: " ); break;
         case "place"      : System.out.print( "Please enter a place: " ); break;
         }
         if( var ) {
            current = sc.next();
         }
         out.print( cstStrBefore + current + cstStrAfter + ' ' );
      }
      sc.close();
      input.close();
      out.close();
   }
}

I suggest you to use Netbeans or Eclipse to develop.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, this is what I was thinking, which I tested by doing a System.out.println(current); after the code you posted. So something like: if the < character is in the token, then do those following steps? –  Keyfer Mathewson Oct 31 '12 at 17:09
    
I've run your program, modified as I suggest, it works well. –  Aubin Oct 31 '12 at 17:11
    
Is the only way to check to see if the < is in the string, is to do a for loop? or is there a specific function I can use like: if (current.contains("<")) –  Keyfer Mathewson Oct 31 '12 at 17:16
    
i'm not sure I understand your if loop :S –  Keyfer Mathewson Oct 31 '12 at 17:19
    
Now what seems to happen is for the ." after the plural-noun vanishes. –  Keyfer Mathewson Oct 31 '12 at 17:53

Its also good practice to close any open streams after they have been used . (Although the JVM probably takes care of this)

out.close(); input.close();sc.close();

Outside your while{}

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