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I am implementing hash table in C using linked list chaining method. The program runs, but while searching for an entry, i always get the result "Element is not found" though the element is in hash. This post is a slight edit to my previous post. The program is below:

struct llist{
   char *s;
   struct llist *next;
};

struct llist *a[100];

void hinsert(char *str){
   int strint, hashinp;
   strint = 0;
   hashinp = 0;
   while(*str){
      strint = strint+(*str);
      str=str+1;
   }
   hashinp = (strint%100);
   if(a[hashinp] == NULL){
      struct llist *node;
      node = (struct llist *)malloc(sizeof(struct llist));
      node->s = str;
      node->next = NULL;
      a[hashinp] = node;
   }
   else{
      struct llist *node, *ptr;
      node = (struct llist *)malloc(sizeof(struct llist));
      node->s = str;
      node->next = NULL;
      ptr = a[hashinp];
      while(ptr->next != NULL){
         ptr = ptr->next;
      }
      ptr->next = node;
   }
}  

void hsearch(char *strsrch){
   int strint1, hashinp1;
   strint1 = 0;
   hashinp1 = 0;
   while(*strsrch){
      strint1 = strint1+(*strsrch);
      strsrch = strsrch+1;
   }
   hashinp1 = (strint1%100);
   struct llist *ptr1;
   ptr1 = a[hashinp1];
   while(ptr1 != NULL){
      if(ptr1->s == strsrch){
         cout << "Element Found\n";
         break;
      }else{
         ptr1 = ptr1->next;
      }
   }
   if(ptr1 == NULL){
      cout << "Element Not Found\n";
   }
}  

hinsert() is to insert elements into hash and hsearch is to search an element in the hash. Hash function is written inside hinsert() itself. In the main(), what i am initializing all the elements in a[] to be NULL like this:

for(int i = 0;i < 100; i++){
   a[i] = NULL;
}
share|improve this question
    
1) hsearch is the name of a library function. 2) there is no << operator in C that takes an operand of type "char*" 3) don't cast malloc()s return value, it is void* and can be cast to any pointer type. 4) you are comparing string pointers, try to compare the strings instead. 5) try to use unsigned types for indexing, that will free you of a lot of index underflow problems 6) for() loops will save you 2 lines and a lot of headaches, compared to while() loops. 7) the constant 100 appears twice in your program. The preprocessor and sizeof are your friends. –  wildplasser Oct 31 '12 at 18:28
    
I found the mistake. i should write hash function seperately. if i write it in insert function, str becomes '\0' after the while loop is done. So, when i say node->s = str, '\0' is being inserted into node->s. That is messing up everything. Thanks again !! –  Justin Carrey Oct 31 '12 at 20:34
    
That's only one misstake. There are (at least) four more left. –  wildplasser Oct 31 '12 at 21:04
    
but after i corrected it, my program is behaving as i intended. Can you please tell me what are the other ones(except the bad hash function. it does the job though)? –  Justin Carrey Oct 31 '12 at 21:06
    
instead of string pointers, i have changed the code to compare strings using strcmp() –  Justin Carrey Oct 31 '12 at 21:12
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You're not advancing the pointer in this loop. (this is also a really bad hash function)

while(*str){
        strint = strint+(*str);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Why is this a bad hash function? Is it the way i implemented? I am just curious. I can improve the program if any suggestions are made. –  Justin Carrey Oct 31 '12 at 17:15
    
One reason is that it could result in a negative value. The other is that "abc" and "cba" will hash to the same value. And the third is that the loop never finishes. –  wildplasser Oct 31 '12 at 18:33
    
@JustinCarrey look around on the net for people talking about hashing strings or general hashing. There's been a lot of research and testing and also endless debates. Unless your strings are perfectly random a simple sum will end up with bad distribution of hash values. I've personally stopped looking for the perfect hash function and use trees to store data. It's more elegant, doesn't have exploitable corner cases and in very many cases is faster in macro benchmarks. –  Art Nov 1 '12 at 8:20
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Is your program in an infinite loop? Perhaps with this line?

while(*str){
        strint = strint+(*str);
}

Your pointer to *str will never be invalid in that loop's scope so you should be getting an infinite loop.

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