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I have a numpy array such as:

array = [0.2, 0.3, 0.4]

(this vector is actually size 300k dense, I'm just illustrating with simple examples)

and a sparse symmetric matrix created using Scipy such as follows:

M = [[0, 1, 2]  
     [1, 0, 1]  
     [2, 1, 0]]

(represented as dense just to illustrate; in my real problem it's a (300k x 300k) sparse matrix)

Is it possible to multiply all rows by the elements in array and then make the same operation regarding the columns?

This would result first in :

M = [[0 * 0.2, 1 * 0.2, 2 * 0.2]
     [1 * 0.3, 0 * 0.3, 1 * 0.3]
     [2 * 0.4, 1 * 0.4, 0 * 0.4]]

(rows are being multiplied by the elements in array)

M = [[0, 0.2, 0.4]
     [0.3, 0, 0.3]
     [0.8, 0.4, 0]]

And then the columns are multiplied:

M = [[0 * 0.2, 0.2 * 0.3, 0.4 * 0.4]
     [0.3 * 0.2, 0 * 0.3, 0.3 * 0.4]
     [0.8 * 0.2, 0.4 * 0.3, 0 * 0.4]]

Resulting finally in:

M = [[0, 0.06, 0.16]
     [0.06, 0, 0.12]
     [0.16, 0.12, 0]]

I've tried applying the solution I found in this thread, but it didn't work; I multiplied the data of the M by the elements in array as it was suggested, then transposed the matrix and applied the same operation but the result wasn't correct, still coudn't understand why!

Just to point this out, the matrix I'll be running this operations are somewhat big, it has 20 million non-zero elements so efficiency is very important!

I appreciate your help!

Edit:

Bitwise solution worked very well. Here it took 1.72 s to compute this operation but that's ok to our work. Tnx!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

In general you want to avoid loops and use matrix operations for speed and efficiency. In this case the solution is simple linear algebra, or more specifically matrix multiplication.

To multiply the columns of M by the array A, multiply M*diag(A). To multiply the rows of M by A, multiply diag(A)*M. To do both: diag(A)*M*diag(A), which can be accomplished by:

numpy.dot(numpy.dot(a, m), a)

diag(A) here is a matrix that is all zeros except having A on its diagonal. You can have methods to create this matrix easily (e.g. numpy.diag() and scipy.sparse.diags()).

I expect this to run very fast.

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Wonderful Bitwise!!! This worked freaking well!!! I'm kinda feeling stupid for not thinking on this before lol, but anyways, thanks a lot, this will help me a lot! –  Will Nov 1 '12 at 12:08
1  
Just to make sure, in the solution when it says "a" one should read "diag(a)", or make a = diag(a), or make a = sparse.diags(a, 0) and it works correctly –  Will Nov 1 '12 at 12:20

The following should work:

[[x*array[i]*array[j] for j, x in enumerate(row)] for i, row in enumerate(M)]

Example:

>>> array = [0.2, 0.3, 0.4]
>>> M = [[0, 1, 2], [1, 0, 1], [2, 1, 0]]
>>> [[x*array[i]*array[j] for j, x in enumerate(row)] for i, row in enumerate(M)]
[[0.0, 0.059999999999999998, 0.16000000000000003], [0.059999999999999998, 0.0, 0.12], [0.16000000000000003, 0.12, 0.0]]

Values are slightly off due to limitations on floating point arithmetic. Use the decimal module if the rounding error is unacceptable.

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Tnx for the answer. I tried it but after a few minutes it was still processing and I had to stop it. Is there a faster solution? Tnx! –  Will Oct 31 '12 at 17:45
    
Are you using Python lists or numpy arrays? You won't get much faster than this for Python lists, it makes only one pass over each element in your nested list. –  Andrew Clark Oct 31 '12 at 17:49
    
I'm using sparse matrix from scipy and the array is a numpy vector. I represented as lists in the question just to illustrate better. –  Will Oct 31 '12 at 18:02
    
You should edit your question with that info, since it sounds like a numpy solution is your best bet at getting the speed you need. –  Andrew Clark Oct 31 '12 at 18:11
    
Just did it! Tnx for the help! –  Will Oct 31 '12 at 18:16

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