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What is wrong with this SQL Server query division calculation?

I am dividing two values in SQL like

SELECT SUM(totalCalls), 
    SUM(EnteredBTN), 
    SUM(EnteredBTN) * 100 / SUM(totalCalls),
    SUM(EnteredACC), 
    SUM(EnteredACC) / SUM(totalCalls), 
    SUM(SentToTrans),
    SUM(SentToTrans) * 100 / SUM(totalCalls),
    SUM(Complete_Information), 
    SUM(Complete_Information) * 100 / SUM(SentToTrans) 

Now when I do SUM(EnteredACC)/SUM(totalCalls) i.e 7/48, it should give me .14 but it gives 0 instead.

When I do SUM(EnteredACC)*100/SUM(totalCalls) it should give 14.58 (or 15 when rounded off) but it gives 14 as the result. Can anyone help please?

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marked as duplicate by Pondlife, Jonathan Leffler, LittleBobbyTables, bmargulies, bstpierre Nov 2 '12 at 20:02

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

4  
You're dividing an integer by an integer. This results in an integer. If you want a decimal result, try *100.0 or *1.0. If you want to specify number of decimal places, use an explicit cast like Lamak's and Void Ray's answers - but please specify an explicit precision + scale. –  Aaron Bertrand Oct 31 '12 at 17:22

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The answer is simple, most likely the data type of the columns EnteredACC and totalCalls is INT (or SMALLINT, BIGINT,etc), therefore it your result is an INT. So, 14.58 becomes 14 and 0.14 becomes 0. You need to do a cast (implicit or explicit) to your datatype:

SUM(CAST(EnteredACC AS DECIMAL(16,4))/SUM(totalCalls)
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Thanks i had everything set to decimal type except for this particular temporary table . I missed it somehow thanks for the help . –  ffayyaz Oct 31 '12 at 18:51

You need floating point division, not integer division.

SELECT SUM(totalCalls), 
    SUM(EnteredBTN), 
    SUM(EnteredBTN)*100/CAST(SUM(totalCalls) as FLOAT),
    SUM(EnteredACC), 
    SUM(EnteredACC)/SUM(totalCalls), 
    SUM(SentToTrans),
    SUM(SentToTrans) * 100 / SUM(totalCalls),
    SUM(Complete_Information), 
    SUM(Complete_Information) * 100 / CAST(SUM(SentToTrans) as FLOAT)
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3  
I disagree that FLOAT is the right answer here. –  Aaron Bertrand Oct 31 '12 at 17:24
    
Out of curiosity, why is decimal more appropriate? –  PRNDL Development Studios Oct 31 '12 at 17:25
    
Because the OP only seems to want two decimal places. Why would FLOAT be better, aside from the fact that you will end up with much bigger numbers to look at such as 14.58000000000000000001? –  Aaron Bertrand Oct 31 '12 at 17:40
    
Ahh gotcha. So it is not a matter of performance, but a matter of style? I only have about a year of SQL experience, so I didn't know. Thanks. –  PRNDL Development Studios Oct 31 '12 at 19:59
    
Well, and accuracy, too. You should only use FLOAT, IMHO, if you specifically want its approximation properties. In most business applications (I would never say all), FLOAT is not warranted. I've been using SQL Server since 6.5 and I have yet to deal directly with any customer system where FLOAT was the better choice. I'm sure they exist, but when we're talking about dividing integers and expressing percentages, FLOAT is not the right choice. Again, IMHO. –  Aaron Bertrand Oct 31 '12 at 20:02

Try: select cast(cast(7 as decimal(18,2))/cast(48 as decimal(18,2)) as decimal(18,2))

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4  
If you're going to explicitly cast as decimal, you should include precision and scale. Do you know what the defaults are? Does the OP? Will future readers? –  Aaron Bertrand Oct 31 '12 at 17:23
1  
I was just trying to point out that the issue is with the data type. Precision and scale are not in question here. –  Void Ray Oct 31 '12 at 17:31
    
It is still poor practice to ever - especially when demonstrating code - exclude precision/scale/length. Here are my arguments about VARCHAR but they apply equally to DECIMAL, VARBINARY, DATETIME2, etc.: sqlblog.com/blogs/aaron_bertrand/archive/2009/10/09/… –  Aaron Bertrand Oct 31 '12 at 17:42
    
Aaron, I would have to agree re: Varchar, but for decimal and especially for some demo code, defaults are just fine; IMHO. –  Void Ray Oct 31 '12 at 17:52
    
you're missing my point. And that's okay, hopefully other readers will get it. –  Aaron Bertrand Oct 31 '12 at 17:53

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