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I'm trying to write a sorting algorithm of sorts in C++, and then write it up in pseudo code after which, now writing it in pseudo is not too bad, however getting it down in my head is turning into a struggle, so the question I pose to you guys:

I'm looking to create an algorithm that takes an unsorted array,along with two integers(Lets say B AND C) and outputs TRUE, if A contains an element which is both greater than B and less than C, otherwise it returns FALSE.

For J <-- 1 to Length[A]
       Count <-- j+1
              while Count =< Length[A]

This is my start for pseudo code, seeing as that seemed like the logical thing to start with, then implement it in c++, However I found myself going round in circles creating loops, and not making much progress. Hope everything I've said makes sense and someone can put it all together to create some form of solution. thanks.

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Would std::sort work for you? –  andre Oct 31 '12 at 18:06
2  
I don't see what this has to do with sorting. First you say you want to sort an array, but then you say that you simply want to find out if there's elements greater than B and less than C. –  Nikos C. Oct 31 '12 at 18:07
    
Im sorry it was not clear, the code above is not suppose to be c++, its a kind of pseudo code, hence the '<--', I need to compare to intergers to elements within an array, TRUE if the array contains an element which is both greater than B and less than C, FALSE otherwise, –  Unknown Oct 31 '12 at 18:08
    
Again, needs to be written in this style of pseudo code –  Unknown Oct 31 '12 at 18:09
    
Probably not what you want, but here's an example pseudo-code to do what you requested: ideone.com/YBIyQf –  Mr. Llama Oct 31 '12 at 18:11

4 Answers 4

From what I recall from Steve McConnell's Code Complete, your pseudocode should ideally look a lot more like English than it does. You're jumping too quickly to implementation in my humble opinion.

What about this:

for each element in array
    check to see if element is between B and C
    if element is between B and C
        return TRUE
    else
        continue loop
next

return FALSE

That's what I gather from your statement:

I'm looking to create an algorithm that takes an unsorted array,along with two integers(Lets say B AND C) and outputs TRUE, if A contains an element which is both greater than B and less than C, otherwise it returns FALSE.

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That's somewhat similar yes, Unfortunately we've been taught this odd style of pseudo code, thus I can't seem to find any information to help me out on it, other than resources handed out, which is far from enough really –  Unknown Oct 31 '12 at 18:13
    
Oh OK. I'm not familiar with that methodology for pseudocode. In practice, though, I'd argue that if you're having issues with understanding the pseudocode, it's not really doing its job. It should help you clarify your logic, not hide it further. –  John Oct 31 '12 at 18:20

I'd start with a function to check the condition you care about: given a number, does it fall within a specified range:

boolean function in_range(A, B, C) {
    return (A > B) and (A < C);
}

From there, it becomes a simple matter of scanning through the array and calling the function, passing each element of the array as A (and the B and C that were supplied as B and C). If the function returns true at any point, you can stop scanning and the outer function returns true as well (for what it's worth, C++11 provides std::any_of for this kind of situation).

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Thanks, both of these posts help me write the code in c++, I suppose from there I can write it in the pseudo code style we've been shown without too much trouble. thanks for the advice –  Unknown Oct 31 '12 at 18:16

You are just searching for an x inside the array that matches the criteria x > B && x < C. A linear search would do - if you are going do the search only once. If search has to be done multiple times (anything more than log (size of array)) then it makes sense to sort first and then do a binary search.

bool InRangeSearch(low, high)
{
  index = upper_bound(array, low);
  if(index==-1)
    return false;

  index2 = lower_bound(array, high);
  if(index2==-1)
    return true;

  return ((index2-1)>index);
}
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Pseudocode:

Quicksort(A as array, low as int, high as int)
    if (low < high)
        pivot_location = Partition(A,low,high)
    Quicksort(A,low, pivot_location - 1)
    Quicksort(A, pivot_location + 1, high)

Partition(A as array, low as int, high as int)
     pivot = A[low]
     leftwall = low

     for i = low + 1 to high
         if (A[i] < pivot) then
             leftwall = leftwall + 1
             swap(A[i], A[leftwall])

     swap(A[low],A[leftwall])

    return (leftwall)

Program Code:

#include <stdio.h>

void quickSort( int[], int, int);
int partition( int[], int, int);


int  main() 
{
    int a[] = { 7, 12, 1, -2, 0, 15, 4, 11, 9};

    int i;
    printf("\n\nUnsorted array is:  ");
    for(i = 0; i < 9; ++i)      printf(" %d ", a[i]);

    quickSort( a, 0, 8);

    printf("\n\nSorted array is:  ");
    for(i = 0; i < 9; ++i)      printf(" %d ", a[i]);

    printf("\n\n " );
    return 0;

}



void quickSort( int a[], int l, int r)
{
   int j;

   if( l < r ) 
   {

        j = partition( a, l, r);
       quickSort( a, l, j-1);
       quickSort( a, j+1, r);
   }

}



int partition( int a[], int l, int r) {
   int pivot, i, j, t;
   pivot = a[l];
   i = l; j = r+1;

   while( 1)
   {
    do ++i; while( a[i] <= pivot && i <= r );
    do --j; while( a[j] > pivot );
    if( i >= j ) break;
    t = a[i]; a[i] = a[j]; a[j] = t;
   }
   t = a[l]; a[l] = a[j]; a[j] = t;
   return j;
}
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