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I need this for writting a design document.

EDIT: Language is C++ and ruby/php/python

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4  
Copy & Paste from Visual Studio works. –  Josef Pfleger Aug 22 '09 at 17:33
    
Which version of Microsoft Word? –  Nick Presta Aug 22 '09 at 17:37

4 Answers 4

up vote 12 down vote accepted

The SciTE editor understands all those languages and will syntax colour them nicely. It has a "Copy as RTF" command that will then let you paste the syntax coloured code into Word.

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It works! thank you! :D –  nothing-special-here Nov 29 at 19:41

Notepad++ provides a NppExport Plugin with which you can copy the syntax highlighted code in RTF format

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Yep, that's true, but unfurtunately on my PC it just crashes (Win7 Pro x64 + Notepad++ v6.4.5). –  nothing-special-here Nov 29 at 19:42

Check out http://www.planetb.ca/2008/11/syntax-highlight-code-in-word-documents/

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1  
Thank you very much!! Amazingly simple method, and works very well for my workflow. –  Victor Farazdagi Oct 6 '12 at 2:36
    
Doesn't works. Some timeout etc etc meh... –  nothing-special-here Nov 29 at 19:41

You can paste formatted code inside word.

So you can copy the souce code from a source where the format is copied when doing a copy, and paste it into word.

Most of the time you can export it to html from you're editor, open it in IE and paste into word.

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I was resistant to test this (The SciTE editor worked...), but yeah, it works! The advantage over accepted solution is that the syntax coloring is better IMHO than SciTe. +1 | FLOW: open HTML in IE -> check source -> select text and copy -> paste to word -> ??? -> profit :D –  nothing-special-here Nov 29 at 19:46

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