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I am trying to make custom heterogeneous lists and maps. Although there are examples around using Manifest, with Scala 2.10 they are deprecated and I should use TypeTags (or Classtags). In the case of maps it seems I can preserve the binding of an Any to a Type using (say) a tuple String->(TypeTag[ _ <: Any ], Any ).

My problem is how to get from the recovered TypeTag and an undefined T, to be able to return an instance of TypeTag.tpe - at the point in the code where I have //** How do I use saved typeTag to define T here?**

As written, there are no compiler errors in method get, but T is set to Nothing and returns Some(Nothing). I would like my commented-out line to work: case Some( x ) => // println( "Get 2*'pi'=" + x*2 ) where there is a complier message, "value * is not a member of Nothing". I realise I could write more compactly, but as done, I can mouse-over in my IDE and follow step by step. There is a related question - Scala 2.10: What is a TypeTag and how do I use it? but it does not seem to go the 'last mile' - retagging an Any.

How to do this?

Here is the code I have so far:

import scala.reflect._
import scala.reflect.runtime.universe._
import collection.mutable.Map

object Test extends HMap {

  def main( args: Array[ String ] ) {

    var hmap = new HMap
    hmap( "anInt" ) = 1
    hmap( "pi" ) = 3.1416f
    hmap( "c" ) = "hello"
    // Test
    val result = hmap.get( "pi" )
    result match {
      case Some( x ) =>
        println( "Get 'pi'=" + x*2 )
      case _ =>
    }
  }
}

class HMap {
  private var coreMap = 
    Map.empty[ String, ( TypeTag[ _ <: Any ], Any ) ]

  // Save the type tag with the value
  def update[ T: TypeTag ]( key: String, value: T ) = 
    coreMap.put( key, ( typeTag[ T ], value ) )

  override def toString = coreMap.toString

  def get[ T: TypeTag ]( key: String ): Option[ T ] = {
    val option = coreMap.get( key )
    val result = option match {
      case None => None
      case Some( x ) => {
        val typeTag = x._1; val value = x._2
        println( "Matched Type = " + 
            typeTag.tpe + "   Value=" + value )
        // **** How do I use saved typeTag to define T here? ****
        val v = value.asInstanceOf[ T ]
        val s = Some( v )
        println( "Returning " + s )
        s
      }
    }
    result
  }
}

share|improve this question
    
I would like to mention that we reverted our decision to deprecate Manifest. In RC1 only ClassManifest is deprecated, but Manifest is not. –  Eugene Burmako Oct 31 '12 at 19:44
    
Also could you please link to the "examples around using manifests"? I'm not sure it's possible to implement get with the provided signature that would work like you want even with manifests. –  Eugene Burmako Oct 31 '12 at 19:48
    
@Eugene Burmako: will manifests be deprecated in a later release or not at all? –  Arjan Oct 31 '12 at 19:50
    
Here is an example using a typed key: codeslashslashcomment.com/2012/03/11/… as suggested below by @Arjan. –  Magpie Oct 31 '12 at 23:21
    
I don't like having to specify the type again as that is part of the info I am trying to look up. What if I use two maps both using the same key, one having the TypeTag and the other having values ( or a rearrangement of the same idea), then when I did the second get, I would already have the typeTag without the original caller having had to specify it again. So the question becomes how to get the typeTag into the T of the get? get[aTypeTag.tpe]("pi"). Or, alternatively, create some instance of aTypeTag and use it as a second argument and infer the type for the second get from that?? –  Magpie Nov 1 '12 at 0:04

2 Answers 2

Here is my own answer:

I don't need TypeTags and I don't really need a keyed type or a tuple. Just simple generics seems to do. I don't need a match & case classes enumerating the possible values for Any. Just a simple map of name-value pairs. I then access it using

hmap.get Float .... println( "Get 'pi'=" + x * 2 )

It seems reasonable and very readable to just invoke: hmap.get Float . The types are not checked at compile time and so I will get runtime errors if I ask for the wrong type. If I do decide to filter the types there is a place to do it. I should check for castability and let Option return None if it can't be done and not Exception as it does now.

To me the above is neater & reads nicer than casting later since all the error handling can be in the get rather than using :

hmap.get("pi").asInstanceOf[Float].

Thanks for your help!

Here is the simpler code now:

 import collection.mutable.Map

object Test extends HMap {

  def main( args: Array[ String ] ) {

    var hmap = new HMap
    hmap( "anInt" ) = 1
    hmap( "pi" ) = 3.1416f
    hmap( "c" ) = "hello"
    // Test
    val result = hmap.get[ Float]( "pi" )
    result match {
      case Some( x ) =>
        println( "Get 'pi'=" + x * 2 )
      case _ => println("Not found")
    }
  }
}

class HMap {
  private var coreMap =
    Map.empty[ String, Any ]

  // Save the key with the value
  def update[ T ]( key: String, value: T ) =
    coreMap.put( key, value )

  def get[ T ]( key: String ): Option[ T ] = {
    val option = coreMap.get( key )
    option match {
      case None      => None
      case Some( x ) => Some( x.asInstanceOf[ T ] )
    }
  }
}

share|improve this answer
    
how does that differ from my 1. solution? –  Arjan Nov 1 '12 at 9:03
    
@Arjan My apologies - I was focused on your solution 2. –  Magpie Nov 1 '12 at 14:51
    
Arjan & @Eugene Burmako: I continued with my example to eliminate the possibility of exception if a wrong type is specified, say get[Int]"Pi" when it it should have been get[Float]"Pi". I need a check that the object x that I get from the map is a T. I use def get[T:TypeTag](key:String), so now I get compiler warnings. If I say case Some(x:T), I get "abstract type pattern T is unchecked since it is eliminated by erasure". If I try x.instanceOf[T], I get "abstract type T is unchecked since it is eliminated by erasure". How do I check that x is a T? –  Magpie Nov 1 '12 at 15:19
    
look at my updated answer –  Arjan Nov 1 '12 at 16:45

T is defined when you call the method get, you cant change it inside a function to another type. Compiler need information to get type information for T or you have to provide it explicitly:

def get[T](key: String) = m.get(key).map(_.asInstanceOf[T])
get[Int]("anInt")

If a key is typed, then T can be inferred:

class Key[T](name: String)
def get[T](key: Key[T]) = ...
get(Key[Int]("anInt"))

To check the type is correct when getting from map you can do what you did originally, save a type and a value:

val m = Map.empty[String, (Type, Any)]

def put[T: TypeTag](key: String, value: T) = m.put(key, (typeOf[T], value))

def get[T: TypeTag](key: String) = m.get(key) match {
    case Some((t, v)) if t =:= typeOf[T] => Some(v.asInstanceOf[T])
    case _ => None
}
share|improve this answer

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