Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

My question is quite simple.

When i write long sql senteces into a variable i use the following form:

sql = """ select a, b, c, d ,e,
          from tables where a=a and b=b and c=c and so on..
      """

but, its correct to use this "technique" on variables for if statements?

example 1:

if message[0] == """ this is a huge message, and it will
probably break to a second line, ( i told you )
""":
    print "   alfa "
else:
    print "  omega "

example 2:

html=i.invoke_server('localhost')

doc = LH.fromstring(html)
LE.strip_tags(doc,'b')
regex ="""
//td[text()='activeThreadCount']
/following-sibling::*/text()
"""

On example two, i believe it could achieve what PEP8 says using

regex ="""
//td[text()='activeThreadCount']
/following-sibling::*/text()
"""

instead

regex ="//td[text()='activeThreadCount']/following-sibling::*/text()"

But it is correct? split regular expressions, xpath xpressions or other things in this way?

This question is most because of following the steps of PEP8 regarding to use at max 79 chars on a line.

if this is not the correct way to do it, what could be done to follow PEP8 indications?

share|improve this question

closed as not constructive by Wooble, SilentGhost, RichardTheKiwi, Andy Hayden, bmargulies Oct 31 '12 at 22:02

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
It's "valid" syntax. –  user166390 Oct 31 '12 at 18:44
4  
It's probably a bad design if you have to compare a string to 3 lines of text inline, but... sure? –  Wooble Oct 31 '12 at 18:44
    
I cannot vote for reopening the question. Here is the definition of closed as not constructive "As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or specific expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion." I cannot see any of the reasons. The closing voters should think also about people who want to learn what the voters already know. The closing discourages akers. Looks like censorship. –  pepr Nov 1 '12 at 9:07
    
Exact. thanks for pointing that. –  Thales Nov 2 '12 at 15:33

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The triple quoted syntax is great for embedding multi-line text, where the newlines are desired:

message = """\
This is a multi-line message.

 + Source lines match string lines 1:1.
 + No '\\n' noise.
"""

Unfortunately, if you put it in the middle of indented code, the leading spaces on each line become part of the string. textwrap.dedent() saves the day:

def f():
   """Indented docstrings look good.

   If you'll peek at f.__doc__, you'll see leading whitespace here.
   But we don't care because pydoc, doctest and other docstring-parsing
   tools are smart enough to strip it.
   """
   if X:
       print """\
Here I'm writing flush-left to avoid leading whitespace.
But this breaks the visual flow in a horrible way!
"""
   print "where am I now? how did I get here?"
   print textwrap.dedent("""\
       This is much better!  I can have the cake and eat it.
       Unlike docstrings, don't start the first line after quotes.
       """)

But in all your examples the newlines are not desired.
In some cases like SQL, you don't care. For long regexps, check out the re.VERBOSE option, allowing non-significant whitespace, and even comments. Don't know about xpath.

In cases where you care about the precise string, don't use triple quotes. Use concatenation:

xpath = ("//td[text()='activeThreadCount']"
         "/following-sibling::*"
         "/text()")

Finally, don't follow the 80-columns guideline blindly. Be consistent with surrounding code and people, but remember that in some cases a long line may actually be best. For example a long URL which you expect people reading the source to click or copy-paste is much more convenient.

share|improve this answer
    
THank you for your explanation. –  Thales Nov 2 '12 at 15:35

You can escape new lines. Try:

"This is a really long string \
that is going to break lines"

This would print out as "This is a really long string that is going to break lines"

share|improve this answer
6  
This is definitely not preferred by PEP 8 -- In this case, you should use parenthesis and automatic string-concatenation ("this" "that") yields "thisthat" –  mgilson Oct 31 '12 at 18:47
    
@mgilson Thanks for pointing that. –  Thales Oct 31 '12 at 18:48
    
afaik you dont even need the parenthesis ... (unless the strings are on separate lines...) –  Joran Beasley Oct 31 '12 at 18:55
    
@JoranBeasley: right but here the purpose is splitting a long string across lines. –  Beni Cherniavsky-Paskin Oct 31 '12 at 19:01

""" Its a good way, but sometimes I think this is better:

customMsg = "****************\n"
customMsg +="* SOME STRING  *\n"
customMsg +="****************\n"

print customMsg

****************
* SOME STRING  *
****************

Notice the usage of '\n':

It would be the same as:

customMsg ="****************\n* SOME STRING  *\n****************\n"
print customMsg

****************
* SOME STRING  *
****************

But first one Is clearly

""" Example:

customMsg ="""****************
* SOME STRING  *
****************
"""
share|improve this answer
    
The string += is not that nice in Python as the example creates 3 string objects, and immediately throws away the earlier two (via garbage collection). This way, the second example may have the same effect but it is not the same. –  pepr Oct 31 '12 at 19:48
    
Its just for code clarity not for speed. Sorry for not mention it. –  Daniel Sanchez Oct 31 '12 at 19:50

I think this a variant of: if your function gets to long, split it up into pieces. If you are creating sqlstrings, Why not write something like:

def sqlmap(*arg):
    sql = "select * from TABLE where "
    for a,b in arg[0].items():
        op,val = b
        sql += " ".join([a,op,val])

    print '>> ',sql

conditions = {'A':['=','B']}
sqlmap(conditions) 
#output >>  select * from TABLE where A = B
share|improve this answer

Explicitly for re module, usage of the multiline string is recommended for very complex regular expressions when re.VERBOSE (or re.X) is used. See the http://docs.python.org/2/library/re.html#re.X (citation):

This flag allows you to write regular expressions that look nicer. Whitespace within the pattern is ignored, except when in a character class or preceded by an unescaped backslash, and, when a line contains a '#' neither in a character class or preceded by an unescaped backslash, all characters from the leftmost such '#' through the end of the line are ignored.

That means that the two following regular expression objects that match a decimal number are functionally equal:

a = re.compile(r"""\d +  # the integral part
                   \.    # the decimal point
                   \d *  # some fractional digits""", re.X)
b = re.compile(r"\d+\.\d*")

Notice the r"raw string" usage when working with regular expression patterns.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.