Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

When the city input field is blurred I get somnething via an ajax request and set that as the value of a hidden field in the same form that the city field resides in.

$('input#city').on('blur', function() {
    $.ajax({
        url: 'get/something?param=val',
        success: function(response) {
            $('input:hidden[name="something"]').val(response);
        }
    });
});

If the user submits the form immediately after blurring off the city field sometimes due to latency the hidden field is not populated because the SQL on the other end is taking too long.

The form that both these fields are in is also submitted via ajax:

$('form#find-users').on('submit', function() {
    if(NO_AJAX_CURRENTLY_RUNNING_ON_PAGE) {
        // do stuff
    }
});

How to detect if no ajax is running on the page? This will ensure that the city ajax was completed and the hidden field populated before the form is processed.

EDIT

Actually it won't, it will only prevent the form from being submitted. But if I can detect that then I can use a setInterval and keep trying to run that code until it runs because ajax is complete. Ideally there will be something in jQuery that waits until other ajax is complete and then submits.

share|improve this question
add comment

5 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Use jQuery's Ajax Events. As long as all of your Ajax calls are generated using jQuery, you have a way of knowing if any Ajax calls are outstanding.

$(document).ready(function() {
    var ajaxBusy = false;

    $(document).ajaxStart( function() { 
        ajaxBusy = true; 
    }).ajaxStop( function() {
        ajaxBusy = false;
    });
});

Edit:

So that answers your direct question about "How do I know if there is any Ajax call running."

Alternatively, you could disable the form's submit buttons when run your blur handler, and then re-enable it when you're done.

$('input#city').on('blur', function() {
    var submit = $(this).closest('form').find(':submit:enabled');
    submit.prop('disabled', true);
    $.ajax('get/something?param=val').done(function(response) {
        $('input:hidden[name="something"]').val(response);
    }).always(function() {
        submit.prop('disabled', false);
    });
});

Edit 2:

So now we're at the point where we would like to delay the form submission until all current Ajax calls have completed. We let people click on the submit button, but if there are pending Ajax calls we don't do anything right away.

We can use a Deferred object to help us with this.

$(document).ready(function() {
    var ajaxDefer = $.Deferred().resolve();

    $(document).ajaxStart( function() { 
        ajaxDefer = $.Deferred(); 
    }).ajaxStop( function() {
        ajaxDefer.resolve();
    });

    $('form#find-users').on('submit', function() {
        ajaxDefer.always(function() {
            // Code here will always be executed as soon as there are no 
            // Ajax calls running.
            // this points to the deferred object (ajaxDefer), so use the closure
            // to carry over any variables you need.
        });
    });
});
  1. When we're just starting out, we set up our ajaxDefer object in a resolved state. That means any functions attached using .always() will execute immediately.

  2. When the first Ajax call starts, we replace the old ajaxDefer object with a new one that has not been resolved. Any new functions attached using ajaxDefer.always() will be deferred until later.

  3. When the last Ajax call completes, we call ajaxDefer.resolve(), which causes any unexecuted deferred functions to execute. Now we're back to our initial state, where any newly-attached functions will execute immediately.

  4. When somebody tries to submit the form, create an anonymous function that does the work and attach it to ajaxDefer. It will get executed when appropriate, depending on if there are any outstanding Ajax requests or not. Be mindful of your closures.

share|improve this answer
    
TIL ajaxStart/ajaxStop. Thanks for the advice! –  Jaime Torres Oct 31 '12 at 19:49
    
The second option is better in two ways. (1) You shouldn't allow people to click on buttons that don't do anything yet and (2) you don't have to set up any timers or retry intervals to submit the form after all other ajax functions have completed. If you really insist on going the first route, your life will be made easier if you use a deferred object for ajaxBusy. I can provide a code example for that if you like. –  slashingweapon Oct 31 '12 at 19:59
    
@slashingweapon yea normally I would just disable the submit button but in this situation the first option is the right one. The ajax call gets the latitude and longitude of the city from a database and sets it as the value of 2 hidden fields. Since the fields are hidden if I disable the submit button the user wouldn't know why that was done. He would see the rest of the form being filled in properly and not understand and think the site is broken. –  TK123 Oct 31 '12 at 20:30
    
@slashingweapon but yea I would appreciate an example by what you meant as using a deferred object for ajax busy because now I am using a setInterval and clearing it on successful form processing. –  TK123 Oct 31 '12 at 20:34
    
@slashingweapon Nice thanks for the update, will use defer instead. –  TK123 Oct 31 '12 at 20:57
add comment

you can put a variable in the global namespace, perhaps named ajaxLock and toggle it on when AJAX starts and off when the response comes. Then check it before allowing submit.

something like

var ajaxLock = 1;
$('input#city').on('blur', function() {
$.ajax({
    url: 'get/something?param=val',
    success: function(response) {
        $('input:hidden[name="something"]').val(response);
        ajaxLock = 0;
    }
    });
});
share|improve this answer
    
What if it fails? You should use complete instead of success to switch the flag. –  Jaime Torres Oct 31 '12 at 19:36
    
true, I was using code from his example. I dont know that he would like to allow submit on failure. It probably should toggle off tho on complete. ... for me, I would just put it on a generic callback. –  NappingRabbit Oct 31 '12 at 19:38
add comment

Use a lock variable like you suggested:

$('input#city').on('blur', function() {
    window.AJAX_CURRENTLY_RUNNING_ON_PAGE = true;
    $.ajax({
        url: 'get/something?param=val',
        success: function(response) {
            $('input:hidden[name="something"]').val(response);
        },
        complete: function() { window.AJAX_CURRENTLY_RUNNING_ON_PAGE = false; }
    });
});

$('form#find-users').on('submit', function() {
    if(window.AJAX_CURRENTLY_RUNNING_ON_PAGE) {
        return;
    }
    //dostuff
});
share|improve this answer
add comment

What i could have done on this circumstances is to use plugin like block ui or disable the form submit button,the reason is you need to be interactive in your design,you may well able to lock the form submission,but its better to give a message or have a modal gray out

share|improve this answer
add comment

Use this to check if AJAX calls are currently in-progress using JQuery:

if ($.active == 0) {
  ...
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.