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I have a task in front of me where I have an XML document, and I need to transform it into another XML document in a systematic way - changing tag Foo to tag Bar, changing all Qux tags with name="frob" attributes into Frob tags, and so on. I don't know anything about how to use XSLT, but I said to myself - hey, if I have to perpetrate a series of transformations on tree-based data, that sounds like something Lisp is good at!

So I have a chunk of XML - for example:

<Object>
    <field name="id">100520</field>
    <field name="type_id">77</field>
    <field name="has_extras"></field>
    <field name="author_id">7</field>
    <field name="summary">To Sir Duke, with love</field>
</Object>

I slurp that up with xml-parse tag and get:

(Object nil "\n        "
     (field
     ((name . "id"))
     "100520")
    "\n        "
    (field
     ((name . "type_id"))
     "77")
    "\n        "
    (field
     ((name . "has_extras")))
    "\n        "
    (field
     ((name . "author_id"))
     "7")
    "\n        "
    (field
     ((name . "summary"))
     "To Sir Duke, with love")
    "\n    ")

I'm having trouble figuring out how to deal with that tree to get it into the shape that I want. My current attempts are brittle - heavy on assoc and the cxr functions. CL's destructuring-bind appears to be what I want, but I can't figure out how to apply it. I'm trying to transform the above structure into this:

(Object
  (id "100520")
  (type_id "77")
  (has_extras "")
  (author_id "7")
  (summary "To Sir Duke, with love"))
  • Is destructuring-bind actually the tool I need?
  • If so, how should I be applying it to get from one shape of my data to another?
  • If not, what is the right tool for this?
share|improve this question
    
If XSLT is an option, I would seriously recommend it for this task. You can achieve what you're describing with a very concise transform and then go have a beer. To address your question more directly, I don't think that destructuring-bind, or emacs lisp, is the tool that you need. –  harpo Oct 31 '12 at 20:10
    
Fiddlesticks. I was afraid of that. I'm not so much worried about learning XSLT, as about doing so on a deadline. My thought was "well I have my Lisp tools to hand, let's see what I can do with those." –  Brighid McDonnell Oct 31 '12 at 20:14
    
To follow-up, I have nothing against emacs lisp. I just don't think it's the right tool for XML transforms. For this reason, I just wrote some code to export internal representations of org documents into XML so that I could perform transforms on them (whose target output was XHTML). That was my preference, but in your case you need a two-way translation in addition to the actual transform you're doing, so you're liable to get lost in the translation, so to speak. –  harpo Oct 31 '12 at 20:14
    
If you want to re-cast this as an XSLT question (with sample input and output) I (or any of the real XSLT gurus here) would be happy to help with that. It's not scary, and, unlike lisp, is actually a functional language. –  harpo Oct 31 '12 at 20:15
    
I may do that: however, seeing what a solution would look like in Lisp is still something I want. –  Brighid McDonnell Oct 31 '12 at 22:01

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It's true that destructuring-bind isn't quite up to this job, but in Emacs 24 you can do it very concisely using the pcase pattern-matching macro, like so:

(require 'cl)                ;; for `mapcan'
(require 'pcase)

(defun xslt-in-elisp (xml)
  (pcase xml
    (`(Object . ,rest)
     `(Object . ,(mapcan #'xslt-in-elisp rest)))

    (`(field ((name . ,name)))
     `((,(intern name) "")))

    (`(field ((name . ,name)) ,value)
     `((,(intern name) ,value)))

    (_ nil)))

(xslt-in-elisp
 '(Object nil "\n        "
          (field ((name . "id")) "100520")
          "\n        "
          (field
           ((name . "type_id"))
           "77")
          "\n        "
          (field
           ((name . "has_extras")))
          "\n        "
          (field
           ((name . "author_id"))
           "7")
          "\n        "
          (field
           ((name . "summary"))
           "To Sir Duke, with love")
          "\n    "))

which evaluates to:

(Object
 (id "100520")
 (type_id "77")
 (has_extras "")
 (author_id "7")
 (summary "To Sir Duke, with love"))

How it works: pcase takes a value to pattern match and a series of clauses (PATTERN VALUE) to try in order. You can look up the details with M-x describe-function pcase, but basically patterns look like what you want them to match, using the backquote syntax to specify which parts are pattern-matching variables to bind and which parts match as literal symbols. So, the first rule

`(Object . ,rest)

matches any list with Object as the first symbol, and binds the variable rest to any remaining elements. The rule

`(field ((name . ,name))` 

matches the S-exp for a field tag with a name but no content (like has_extras in the example). And so on. The last rule, _, returns nil for anything that doesn't match these rules. The right hand side of each rule can be any Lisp expression. For this sort of transformation it's most useful to use backquote and unquote, which has the bonus that templates look just like the rules they match.

The only slightly tricky part is how to accumulate the transformed values of the child nodes of (Object ...). If we used mapcar to iterate over them, we'd end up with unwanted nils where there was originally strings of whitespace and other garbage. The solution is to have the rules for the field tags return a one-element list, and use mapcan from the cl package to concatenate these one-element lists together. Garbage elements like nil and the whitespace strings just match the _ rule, so they are transformed into the empty list and disappear from the result.

I wrote the transformer as a recursive function, but for robustness you could just as easily split it up into a top-level transformer that only matches the (Object ...) sexps, and a separate transformer which only matches the (field ... ) sexps.

share|improve this answer
    
I didn't know that pcase existed! I'm excited to try out your recommendations, thank you. –  Brighid McDonnell Nov 1 '12 at 0:52
    
Hope it was helpful! pcase is quite new, I think. I haven't used it that much myself, but it seems very useful for this kind of thing. I don't know if there's a quick way to use Elisp to generate XML from the transformed s-exps, though .. ? –  Jon O. Nov 4 '12 at 12:47
    
I was planning to do the s-exprs-to-XML part with basic string manipulation, but I might try out xml-to-string.el if I feel frisky. As for pcase: yes, it's just emacs 24, and it shows in that the documentation is terse in a very man-page-esque way. I should blogulate about it - and learn about it. –  Brighid McDonnell Nov 4 '12 at 19:15

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