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I have a large table of events. Per user I want to count the occurence of type A events before the earliest type B event.

I am searching for an elegant query. Hive is used so I can't do subqueries

Timestamp Type User 
...        A    X
...        A    X
...        B    X
...        A    X
...        A    X

...        A    Y
...        A    Y
...        A    Y
...        B    Y
...        A    Y

Wanted Result:

User Count_Type_A 
X    2
Y    3

I could not get the "cut-off" timestamp by doing:

Select User, min(Timestamp) 
Where Type=B 
Group BY User;

But then how can I use that information inside the next query where I want to do something like:

SELECT User, count(Timestamp) 
WHERE Type=A AND Timestamp<min(User.Timestamp_Type_B) 
GROUP BY User;

My only idea so far are to determine the cut-off timestamps first and then do a join with all type A events and then select from the resulting table, but that feels wrong and would look ugly.

I'm also considering the possibility that this is the wrong type of problem/analysis for Hive and that I should consider hand-written map-reduce or pig instead.

Please help me by pointing in the right direction.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

First Update:

In response to Cilvic's first comment to this answer, I've adjusted my query to the following based on workarounds suggested in the comments found at https://issues.apache.org/jira/browse/HIVE-556:

SELECT [User], COUNT([Timestamp]) AS [Before_First_B_Count]
FROM [Dataset] main
CROSS JOIN (SELECT [User], min([Timestamp]) [First_B_TS] FROM [Dataset]
    WHERE [Type] = 'B'
    GROUP BY [User]) sub 
WHERE main.[Type] = 'A'
AND (sub.[User] = main.[User]) 
AND (main.[Timestamp] < sub.[First_B_TS])
GROUP BY main.[User]

Original:

Give this a shot:

SELECT [User], COUNT([Timestamp]) AS [Before_First_B_Count]
FROM [Dataset] main
JOIN (SELECT [User], min([Timestamp]) [First_B_TS] FROM [Dataset]
    WHERE [Type] = 'B'
    GROUP BY [User]) sub 
        ON (sub.[User] = main.[User]) AND (main.[Timestamp] < sub.[First_B_TS])
WHERE main.[Type] = 'A'
GROUP BY main.[User]

I did my best to follow hive syntax. Let me know if you have any questions. I would like to know why you wish/need to avoid a subquery.

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I found that hive (unfortunately does not support the < join condition: "Only equality joins, outer joins, and left semi joins are supported in Hive. Hive does not support join conditions that are not equality conditions as it is very difficult to express such conditions as a map/reduce job." cwiki.apache.org/Hive/languagemanual-joins.html –  Cilvic Nov 4 '12 at 8:23
    
My apologies. I made another attempt. Please let me know whether it works. In short, I moved the ON statement to the WHERE clause and made the (INNER) JOIN a CROSS JOIN. –  coge.soft Nov 5 '12 at 22:47

In general, I +1 coge.soft's solution. Here it is again for your reference:

SELECT [User], COUNT([Timestamp]) AS [Before_First_B_Count]
FROM [Dataset] main
JOIN (SELECT [User], min([Timestamp]) [First_B_TS] FROM [Dataset]
    WHERE [Type] = 'B'
    GROUP BY [User]) sub 
        ON (sub.[User] = main.[User]) AND (main.[Timestamp] < sub.[First_B_TS])
WHERE main.[Type] = 'A'
GROUP BY main.[User]

However, a couple things to note:

  1. What happens when there are no B events? Assuming you would want to count all the A events per user in that case an inner join as specified in the solution wouldn't work since there would be no entry for that user in the sub table. You would need to change to a left outer join for that.

  2. The solution also does 2 passes over the data - one to populate the sub table, other to join the sub table with the main table. Depending on your notion of performance and efficiency, there is an alternative where you could do this by a single pass of data. You can distribute the data by user using Hive's distribute by functionality and write a custom reducer that would do your count calculation in your favorite language using Hive's transform functionality.

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That distribute by sounds really interesting! thanks a lot! –  Cilvic Nov 1 '12 at 15:50
    
@Cilvic , is the 2nd point above why you were trying to avoid a subquery (as per the title of your question)? –  coge.soft Nov 1 '12 at 16:06
    
@coge.soft not sure I get your point. I think your proposed solution works. But at the same time it's kind of hard to understand/read. I was hoping to find something more elegant/easier to read. I will need to understand distribute by better first. –  Cilvic Nov 2 '12 at 18:20

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